Cloud Computing by Windows , Amazon and Google for free

Some ways to test and use cloud computing for free for yourself-

  1. Windows Azure
  2. Amazon Ec2
  3. Google Storage

The folks at Microsoft Azure announced a 90 day free trial Continue reading “Cloud Computing by Windows , Amazon and Google for free”

Interview Mike Boyarski Jaspersoft

Here is an interview with Mike Boyarski , Director Product Marketing at Jaspersoft

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the largest BI community with over 14 million downloads, nearly 230,000 registered members, representing over 175,000 production deployments, 14,000 customers, across 100 countries.

Ajay- Describe your career in science from Biology to marketing great software.
Mike- I studied Biology with the assumption I’d pursue a career in medicine. It took about 2 weeks during an internship at a Los Angeles hospital to determine I should do something else.  I enjoyed learning about life science, but the whole health care environment was not for me.  I was initially introduced to enterprise-level software while at Applied Materials within their Microcontamination group.  I was able to assist with an internal application used to collect contamination data.  I later joined Oracle to work on an Oracle Forms application used to automate the production of software kits (back when documentation and CDs had to be physically shipped to recognize revenue). This gave me hands on experience with Oracle 7, web application servers, and the software development process.
I then transitioned to product management for various products including application servers, software appliances, and Oracle’s first generation SaaS based software infrastructure. In 2006, with the Siebel and PeopleSoft acquisitions underway, I moved on to Ingres to help re-invigorate their solid yet antiquated technology. This introduced me to commercial open source software and the broader Business Intelligence market.  From Ingres I joined Jaspersoft, one of the first and most popular open source Business Intelligence vendors, serving as head of product marketing since mid 2009.
Ajay- Describe some of the new features in Jaspersoft 4.1 that help differentiate it from the rest of the crowd. What are the exciting product features we can expect from Jaspersoft down the next couple of years.
Mike- Jaspersoft 4.1 was an exciting release for our customers because we were able to extend the latest UI advancements in our ad hoc report designer to the data analysis environment. Now customers can use a unified intuitive web-based interface to perform several powerful and interactive analytic functions across any data source, whether its relational, non-relational, or a Big Data source.
 The reality is that most (roughly 70%) of todays BI adoption is in the form of reports and dashboards. These tools are used to drive and measure an organizations business, however, data analysis presents the most strategic opportunity for companies because it can identify new opportunities, efficiencies, and competitive differentiation.  As more data comes online, the difference between those companies that are successful and those that are not will likely be attributed to their ability to harness data analysis techniques to drive and improve business performance. Thus, with Jaspersoft 4.1, and our improved ad hoc reporting and analysis UI we can effectively address a broader set of BI requirements for organizations of all sizes.
Ajay-  What do you think is a good metric to measure influence of an open source software product – is it revenue or is it number of downloads or number of users. How does Jaspersoft do by these counts.
Mike- History has shown that open source software is successful as a “bottoms up” disrupter within IT or the developer market.  Today, many new software projects and startup ventures are birthed on open source software, often initiated with little to no budget. As the organization achieves success with a particular project, the next initiative tends to be larger and more strategic, often displacing what was historically solved with a proprietary solution. These larger deployments strengthen the technology over time.
Thus, the more proven and battle tested an open source solution is, often measured via downloads, deployments, community size, and community activity, usually equates to its long term success. Linux, Tomcat, and MySQL have plenty of statistics to model this lifecycle. This model is no different for open source BI.
The success to date of Jaspersoft is directly tied to its solid proven technology and the vibrancy of the community.  We proudly and openly claim to have the largest BI community with over 14 million downloads, nearly 230,000 registered members, representing over 175,000 production deployments, 14,000 customers, across 100 countries.  Every day, 30,000 developers are using Jaspersoft to build BI applications.  Behind Excel, its hard to imagine a more widely used BI tool in the market.  Jaspersoft could not reach these kind of numbers with crippled or poorly architected software.
Ajay- What are your plans for leveraging cloud computing, mobile and tablet platforms and for making Jaspersoft more easy and global  to use.

#Rstats gets into Enterprise Cloud Software

Defense Agencies of the United States Departme...
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Here is an excellent example of how websites should help rather than hinder new customers take a demo of the software without being overwhelmed by sweet talking marketing guys who dont know the difference between heteroskedasticity, probability, odds and likelihood.

It is made by Zementis (Dr Michael Zeller has been a frequent guest here) and Revolution Analytics is still the best shot in Enterprise software for #Rstats

Now if only Revo could get into the lucrative Department of Energy or Department of Defense business- they could change the world AND earn some more revenue than they have been doing. But seriously.

Check out http://deployr.revolutionanalytics.com/zementis/ and play with it. or better still mash it with some data viz and ROC curves.- or extend it with some APIS 😉

R for Analytics is now live

Okay, through the weekend I created a website for a few of my favourite things.

It’s on at https://rforanalytics.wordpress.com/

Graphical User Interfaces for R

 

Jerry Rubin said: “Don’t trust anyone over thirty

I dont trust anyone not using atleast one R GUI. Here’s a list of the top 10.

 

Code Enhancers for R

Here is a list of top 5 code enhancers,editors in R

R Commercial Software

A list of companies and software making (and) selling R software (and) services. Hint- it is almost 5 (unless I missed someone)

R Graphs Resources

R’s famous graphing capabilities and equally famous learning curve can be made a bit more humane- using some of these resources.

Internet Browsing

Because that’s what I do (all I do as per my cat) , and I am pretty good at it.

Using R from other Software

R can be used successfully from a lot of analytical software including some surprising ones praising the great 3000 packages library.

(to be continued- as I find more stuff I will keep it there, some ideas- database access from R, prominent R consultants, prominent R packages, famous R interviewees 😉 )

ps- The quote from Jerry Rubin seems funny for a while. I turn 34 this year.

Open Source Cartoon

Jim Goodnight, Chief Executive Officer, SAS, U...
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Ok I promised a weekly cartoon on Friday but it’s Saturday.
Last week we spoofed Larry Ellison , Jim Goodnight and Bill Gates– people who created billions of taxes for the economy but would be regarded as evil by some open source guys- though they may have created more jobs for more families than the whole Federal Reserve Bank did in 2008-10. Jobs are necessary for families. Period.

You can review it here https://decisionstats.files.wordpress.com/2010/11/os1.png

In Part 2- we see Open Source is actually older than Stallman (yes people are older than Stallman) – in fact open source has been around for far more time than even

Jim Goodnight’s current age- which can be revealed by using proc goodnight options=all.

Using PostgreSQL and MySQL databases in R 2.12 for Windows

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If you use Windows for your stats computing and your data is in a database (probably true for almost all corporate business analysts) R 2.12 has provided a unique procedural hitch for you NO BINARIES for packages used till now to read from these databases.

The Readme notes of the release say-

Packages related to many database system must be linked to the exact
version of the database system the user has installed, hence it does
not make sense to provide binaries for packages
	RMySQL, ROracle, ROracleUI, RPostgreSQL
although it is possible to install such packages from sources by
	install.packages('packagename', type='source')
after reading the manual 'R Installation and Administration'.

So how to connect to Databases if the Windows Binary is not available-

So how to connect to PostgreSQL and MySQL databases.

For Postgres databases-

You can update your PostgreSQL databases here-

http://www.postgresql.org/download/windows

Fortunately the RpgSQL package is still available for PostgreSQL

  • Using the RpgSQL package

library(RpgSQL)

#creating a connection
con <- dbConnect(pgSQL(), user = "postgres", password = "XXXX",dbname="postgres")

#writing a table from a R Dataset
dbWriteTable(con, "BOD", BOD)

# table names are lower cased unless double quoted. Here we write a Select SQL query
dbGetQuery(con, 'select * from "BOD"')

#disconnecting the connection
dbDisconnect(con)

You can also use RODBC package for connecting to your PostgreSQL database but you need to configure your ODBC connections in

Windows Start Panel-

Settings-Control Panel-

Administrative Tools-Data Sources (ODBC)

You should probably see something like this screenshot.

Coming back to R and noting the name of my PostgreSQL DSN from above screenshot-( If not there just click on add-scroll to appropriate database -here PostgreSQL and click on Finish- add in the default values for your database or your own created database values-see screenshot for help with other configuring- and remember to click Test below to check if username and password are working, port is correct etc.

so once the DSN is probably setup in the ODBC (frightening terminology is part of databases)- you can go to R to connect using RODBC package


#loading RODBC

library(RODBC)

#creating a Database connection
# for username,password,database name and DSN name

chan=odbcConnect("PostgreSQL35W","postgres;Password=X;Database=postgres")

#to list all table names

sqlTables(chan)

TABLE_QUALIFIER TABLE_OWNER TABLE_NAME TABLE_TYPE REMARKS
1       postgres      public        bod      TABLE      
 2        postgres      public  database1      TABLE      
 3        postgres      public         tt      TABLE

Now for MySQL databases it is exactly the same code except we download and install the ODBC driver from http://www.mysql.com/downloads/connector/odbc/

and then we run the same configuring DSN as we did for postgreSQL.

After that we use RODBC in pretty much the same way except changing for the default username and password for MySQL and changing the DSN name for the previous step.

channel <- odbcConnect("mysql","jasperdb;Password=XXX;Database=Test")
test2=sqlQuery(channel,"select * from jiuser")
test2
 id  username tenantId   fullname emailAddress  password externallyDefined enabled previousPasswordChangeTime1  1   jasperadmin        1 Jasper Administrator           NA 349AFAADD5C5A2BD477309618DC              NA    01                       
2  2       joe1ser        1             Joe User           NA                 4DD8128D07A               NA    01
odbcClose(channel)
While using RODBC for all databases is a welcome step, perhaps the change release notes for Window Users of R may need to be more substantiative than one given for R 2.12.2