HANA Oncolyzer

An interesting use case of technology for better health is HANA Oncolyzer at http://epic.hpi.uni-potsdam.de/Home/HanaOncolyzer

“Build on the newest in-memory technology the HANA Oncolyzer is able to analyze even huge amounts of medical data in shortest time”, says Dr. Alexander Zeier, Deputy Chair of EPIC. Research institutes and university hospital support from HANA Oncolyzer by building the basis for a flexible exchange of information about efficiency of medicines and treatments.

In near future, the tumor’s DNA of all cancer patients needs to be analyzed to support specific patient therapies. These analyses result in medical data in amount of multiple terabytes. “These data need to be analyzed regarding mutations and anomalies in real-time”, says Matthias Steinbrecher at SAP’s Innovation Center in Potsdam. As one of the aims the research prototype HANA Oncolyzer was developed at our chair in cooperation with SAP’s Innovation Center in Potsdam. “The ‘heart’ of our development builds the in-memory technology that supports the parallel analysis of million of data within seconds in main memory”, saysMatthieu Schapranow, Ph.D. cand. at the HPI.

and

research activities result in 500.000 or more data points per patient.

and

With the help of a dedicated iPad application medical doctors can access all data mobile at any location anytime.

 

Denial of Service Attacks against Hospitals and Emergency Rooms

One of the most frightening possibilities of cyber warfare is to use remotely deployed , or timed intrusion malware to disturb, distort, deny health care services.

Computer Virus Shuts Down Georgia Hospital

A doctor in an Emergency Room depends on critical information that may save lives if it is electronic and comes on time. However this electronic information can be distorted (which is more severe than deleting it)

The electronic system of a Hospital can also be overwhelmed. If there can be built Stuxnet worms on   nuclear centrifuge systems (like those by Siemens), then the widespread availability of health care systems means these can be reverse engineered for particularly vicious cyber worms.

An example of prime area for targeting is Veterans Administration for veterans of armed forces, but also cyber attacks against electronic health records.

Consider the following data points-

http://threatpost.com/en_us/blogs/dhs-warns-about-threat-mobile-devices-healthcare-051612

May 16, 2012, 9:03AM

DHS’s National Cybersecurity and Communications Integration Center (NCCIC) issued the unclassfied bulletin, “Attack Surface: Healthcare and Public Health Sector” on May 4. In it, DHS warns of a wide range of security risks, including that could expose patient data to malicious attackers, or make hospital networks and first responders subject to disruptive cyber attack

http://publicintelligence.net/nccic-medical-device-cyberattacks/

National Cybersecurity and Communications Integration Center Bulletin

The Healthcare and Public Health (HPH) sector is a multi-trillion dollar industry employing over 13 million personnel, including approximately five million first-responders with at least some emergency medical training, three million registered nurses, and more than 800,000 physicians.

(U) A significant portion of products used in patient care and management including diagnosis and treatment are Medical Devices (MD). These MDs are designed to monitor changes to a patient’s health and may be implanted or external. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulates devices from design to sale and some aspects of the relationship between manufacturers and the MDs after sale. However, the FDA cannot regulate MD use or users, which includes how they are linked to or configured within networks. Typically, modern MDs are not designed to be accessed remotely; instead they are intended to be networked at their point of use. However, the flexibility and scalability of wireless networking makes wireless access a convenient option for organizations deploying MDs within their facilities. This robust sector has led the way with medical based technology options for both patient care and data handling.

(U) The expanded use of wireless technology on the enterprise network of medical facilities and the wireless utilization of MDs opens up both new opportunities and new vulnerabilities to patients and medical facilities. Since wireless MDs are now connected to Medical information technology (IT) networks, IT networks are now remotely accessible through the MD. This may be a desirable development, but the communications security of MDs to protect against theft of medical information and malicious intrusion is now becoming a major concern. In addition, many HPH organizations are leveraging mobile technologies to enhance operations. The storage capacity, fast computing speeds, ease of use, and portability render mobile devices an optimal solution.

(U) This Bulletin highlights how the portability and remote connectivity of MDs introduce additional risk into Medical IT networks and failure to implement a robust security program will impact the organization’s ability to protect patients and their medical information from intentional and unintentional loss or damage.

(U) According to Health and Human Services (HHS), a major concern to the Healthcare and Public Health (HPH) Sector is exploitation of potential vulnerabilities of medical devices on Medical IT networks (public, private and domestic). These vulnerabilities may result in possible risks to patient safety and theft or loss of medical information due to the inadequate incorporation of IT products, patient management products and medical devices onto Medical IT Networks. Misconfigured networks or poor security practices may increase the risk of compromised medical devices. HHS states there are four factors which further complicate security resilience within a medical organization.

1. (U) There are legacy medical devices deployed prior to enactment of the Medical Device Law in 1976, that are still in use today.

2. (U) Many newer devices have undergone rigorous FDA testing procedures and come equipped with design features which facilitate their safe incorporation onto Medical IT networks. However, these secure design features may not be implemented during the deployment phase due to complexity of the technology or the lack of knowledge about the capabilities. Because the technology is so new, there may not be an authoritative understanding of how to properly secure it, leaving open the possibilities for exploitation through zero-day vulnerabilities or insecure deployment configurations. In addition, new or robust features, such as custom applications, may also mean an increased amount of third party code development which may create vulnerabilities, if not evaluated properly. Prior to enactment of the law, the FDA required minimal testing before placing on the market. It is challenging to localize and mitigate threats within this group of legacy equipment.

3. (U) In an era of budgetary restraints, healthcare facilities frequently prioritize more traditional programs and operational considerations over network security.

4. (U) Because these medical devices may contain sensitive or privacy information, system owners may be reluctant to allow manufactures access for upgrades or updates. Failure to install updates lays a foundation for increasingly ineffective threat mitigation as time passes.

(U) Implantable Medical Devices (IMD): Some medical computing devices are designed to be implanted within the body to collect, store, analyze and then act on large amounts of information. These IMDs have incorporated network communications capabilities to increase their usefulness. Legacy implanted medical devices still in use today were manufactured when security was not yet a priority. Some of these devices have older proprietary operating systems that are not vulnerable to common malware and so are not supported by newer antivirus software. However, many are vulnerable to cyber attacks by a malicious actor who can take advantage of routine software update capabilities to gain access and, thereafter, manipulate the implant.

(U) During an August 2011 Black Hat conference, a security researcher demonstrated how an outside actor can shut off or alter the settings of an insulin pump without the user’s knowledge. The demonstration was given to show the audience that the pump’s cyber vulnerabilities could lead to severe consequences. The researcher that provided the demonstration is a diabetic and personally aware of the implications of this activity. The researcher also found that a malicious actor can eavesdrop on a continuous glucose monitor’s (CGM) transmission by using an oscilloscope, but device settings could not be reprogrammed. The researcher acknowledged that he was not able to completely assume remote control or modify the programming of the CGM, but he was able to disrupt and jam the device.

http://www.healthreformwatch.com/category/electronic-medical-records/

February 7, 2012

Since the data breach notification regulations by HHS went into effect in September 2009, 385 incidents affecting 500 or more individuals have been reported to HHS, according to its website.

http://www.darkdaily.com/cyber-attacks-against-internet-enabled-medical-devices-are-new-threat-to-clinical-pathology-laboratories-215#axzz1yPzItOFc

February 16 2011

One high-profile healthcare system that regularly experiences such attacks is the Veterans Administration (VA). For two years, the VA has been fighting a cyber battle against illegal and unwanted intrusions into their medical devices

 

http://www.mobiledia.com/news/120863.html

 DEC 16, 2011
Malware in a Georgia hospital’s computer system forced it to turn away patients, highlighting the problems and vulnerabilities of computerized systems.

The computer infection started to cause problems at the Gwinnett Medical Center last Wednesday and continued to spread, until the hospital was forced to send all non-emergency admissions to other hospitals.

More doctors and nurses than ever are using mobile devices in healthcare, and hospitals are making patient records computerized for easier, convenient access over piles of paperwork.

http://www.doctorsofusc.com/uscdocs/locations/lac-usc-medical-center

As one of the busiest public hospitals in the western United States, LAC+USC Medical Center records nearly 39,000 inpatient discharges, 150,000 emergency department visits, and 1 million ambulatory care visits each year.

http://www.healthreformwatch.com/category/electronic-medical-records/

If one jumbo jet crashed in the US each day for a week, we’d expect the FAA to shut down the industry until the problem was figured out. But in our health care system, roughly 250 people die each day due to preventable error

http://www.pcworld.com/article/142926/are_healthcare_organizations_under_cyberattack.html

Feb 28, 2008

“There is definitely an uptick in attacks,” says Dr. John Halamka, CIO at both Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Harvard Medical School in the Boston area. “Privacy is the foundation of everything we do. We don’t want to be the TJX of healthcare.” TJX is the Framingham, Mass-based retailer which last year disclosed a massive data breach involving customer records.

Dr. Halamka, who this week announced a project in electronic health records as an online service to the 300 doctors in the Beth Israel Deaconess Physicians Organization,

Interview Mike Boyarski Jaspersoft

Here is an interview with Mike Boyarski , Director Product Marketing at Jaspersoft

.

 

the largest BI community with over 14 million downloads, nearly 230,000 registered members, representing over 175,000 production deployments, 14,000 customers, across 100 countries.

Ajay- Describe your career in science from Biology to marketing great software.
Mike- I studied Biology with the assumption I’d pursue a career in medicine. It took about 2 weeks during an internship at a Los Angeles hospital to determine I should do something else.  I enjoyed learning about life science, but the whole health care environment was not for me.  I was initially introduced to enterprise-level software while at Applied Materials within their Microcontamination group.  I was able to assist with an internal application used to collect contamination data.  I later joined Oracle to work on an Oracle Forms application used to automate the production of software kits (back when documentation and CDs had to be physically shipped to recognize revenue). This gave me hands on experience with Oracle 7, web application servers, and the software development process.
I then transitioned to product management for various products including application servers, software appliances, and Oracle’s first generation SaaS based software infrastructure. In 2006, with the Siebel and PeopleSoft acquisitions underway, I moved on to Ingres to help re-invigorate their solid yet antiquated technology. This introduced me to commercial open source software and the broader Business Intelligence market.  From Ingres I joined Jaspersoft, one of the first and most popular open source Business Intelligence vendors, serving as head of product marketing since mid 2009.
Ajay- Describe some of the new features in Jaspersoft 4.1 that help differentiate it from the rest of the crowd. What are the exciting product features we can expect from Jaspersoft down the next couple of years.
Mike- Jaspersoft 4.1 was an exciting release for our customers because we were able to extend the latest UI advancements in our ad hoc report designer to the data analysis environment. Now customers can use a unified intuitive web-based interface to perform several powerful and interactive analytic functions across any data source, whether its relational, non-relational, or a Big Data source.
 The reality is that most (roughly 70%) of todays BI adoption is in the form of reports and dashboards. These tools are used to drive and measure an organizations business, however, data analysis presents the most strategic opportunity for companies because it can identify new opportunities, efficiencies, and competitive differentiation.  As more data comes online, the difference between those companies that are successful and those that are not will likely be attributed to their ability to harness data analysis techniques to drive and improve business performance. Thus, with Jaspersoft 4.1, and our improved ad hoc reporting and analysis UI we can effectively address a broader set of BI requirements for organizations of all sizes.
Ajay-  What do you think is a good metric to measure influence of an open source software product – is it revenue or is it number of downloads or number of users. How does Jaspersoft do by these counts.
Mike- History has shown that open source software is successful as a “bottoms up” disrupter within IT or the developer market.  Today, many new software projects and startup ventures are birthed on open source software, often initiated with little to no budget. As the organization achieves success with a particular project, the next initiative tends to be larger and more strategic, often displacing what was historically solved with a proprietary solution. These larger deployments strengthen the technology over time.
Thus, the more proven and battle tested an open source solution is, often measured via downloads, deployments, community size, and community activity, usually equates to its long term success. Linux, Tomcat, and MySQL have plenty of statistics to model this lifecycle. This model is no different for open source BI.
The success to date of Jaspersoft is directly tied to its solid proven technology and the vibrancy of the community.  We proudly and openly claim to have the largest BI community with over 14 million downloads, nearly 230,000 registered members, representing over 175,000 production deployments, 14,000 customers, across 100 countries.  Every day, 30,000 developers are using Jaspersoft to build BI applications.  Behind Excel, its hard to imagine a more widely used BI tool in the market.  Jaspersoft could not reach these kind of numbers with crippled or poorly architected software.
Ajay- What are your plans for leveraging cloud computing, mobile and tablet platforms and for making Jaspersoft more easy and global  to use.

Heritage prize= 3mill now open

I am still angry with THE netflix for 1 mill I lost out. No sweat! this time the money is 3 times as much, it is legit, and yes baby you can change the world, make it a better place and get rich.! see details below-http://www.heritagehealthprize.com/c/hhp/Data

HERITAGE HEALTH PRIZE DATA FILES

You must accept this competition’s rules before you’ll be able to download data files.

IMPORTANT NOTE: The information provided below is intended only to provide general guidance to participants in the Heritage Health Prize Competition and is subject to the Competition Official Rules. Any capitalized term not defined below is defined in the Competition Official Rules. Please consult the Competition Official Rules for complete details.

Heritage Provider Network is providing Competition Entrants with deidentified member data collected during a forty-eight month period that is allocated among three data sets (the “Data Sets”). Competition Entrants will use the Data Sets to develop and test their algorithms for accurately predicting the number of days that the members will spend in a hospital (inpatient or emergency room visit) during the 12-month period following the Data Set cut-off date.

HHP_release2.zip contains the latest files, so you can ignore HHP_release1.zip. SampleEntry.CSV shows you how an entry should look.

Data Sets will be released to Entrants after registration on the Website according to the following schedule:

April 4, 2011 Claims Table – Y1 and DaysInHospital Table – Y2

May 4, 2011

All other Data Sets except Labs Table and Rx Table

From https://www.kaggle.com/

The $3 million Heritage Health Prize opens to entries

It’s been one month since the launch of the Heritage Health Prize. The prize has attracted some great publicity, receiving coverage from the Wall Street JournalThe EconomistSlate andForbes.

By now, people have had a good chance to poke around the first portion of the data. Now the fun starts! HPN have released two more years’-worth of data, set the accuracy threshold and are opening up the competition to entries. The data are available from the Heritage Health Prize page. Good luck to all participants!

The Deloitte/FIDE Chess Ratings Competition results

The Deloitte/FIDE Chess Ratings Competition attracted one of the strongest fields ever seen in a Kaggle Competition. The competition attracted 189 teams, ranging from chess ratings  experts to Netflix Prize winners. As Jeff Sonas wrote on the Kaggle blog last week, the  competition has far exceeded his expectations. A big congratulations the provisional winner, Tim Salimans, an econometrician at Erasmus University in Rotterdam. We look forward to reading about the approaches used by top performers on the Kaggle blog. We also look forward to the results of the FIDE prize, which could see the introduction of a new chess ratings system.

ICDAR 2011 Competition Results

The ICDAR 2011 competition also finished recently. The competiiton required participants to develop an algorithm that correctly matched handwriting samples. The winners were Lewis Griffin and Andrew Newell from the University College London who achieved Kaggle’s first ever perfect score by managing to match every sample correctly! Andrew and Lewis have posted a description of their winning method on the Kaggle blog.

Revolution R Enterprise

Since R is the most popular language used by Kaggle members, the Revolution Analytics team is making Revolution R Enterprise (the pre-eminent commercial version of R) available free of charge to Kaggle members. Revolution R Enterprise has several advantages over standard R, including the ability to seemlessly handle larger datasets. To get your free copy, visit http://info.revolutionanalytics.com/Kaggle.html.
Kaggle-in-Class

As many of you know, Kaggle offers a free platform, Kaggle-in-Class, for instructors who want to host competitions for their students. For those interested in hearing more about the use of Kaggle-in-Class as a teaching tool, Susan Holmes and Nelson Ray from Stanford University share their experience in a webinar organized by the Consortium for the Advancement of Undergraduate Statistics Education.

Heritage Health Prize- Data Mining Contest for 3mill USD

An animation of the quicksort algorithm sortin...
Image via Wikipedia

If Netflix was about 1 mill USD to better online video choices, here is a chance to earn serious money, write great code, and save lives!

From http://www.heritagehealthprize.com/

Heritage Health Prize
Launching April 4

Laptop

More than 71 Million individuals in the United States are admitted to
hospitals each year, according to the latest survey from the American
Hospital Association. Studies have concluded that in 2006 well over
$30 billion was spent on unnecessary hospital admissions. Each of
these unnecessary admissions took away one hospital bed from someone
else who needed it more.

Prize Goal & Participation

The goal of the prize is to develop a predictive algorithm that can identify patients who will be admitted to the hospital within the next year, using historical claims data.

Official registration will open in 2011, after the launch of the prize. At that time, pre-registered teams will be notified to officially register for the competition. Teams must consent to be bound by final competition rules.

Registered teams will develop and test their algorithms. The winning algorithm will be able to predict patients at risk for an unplanned hospital admission with a high rate of accuracy. The first team to reach the accuracy threshold will have their algorithms confirmed by a judging panel. If confirmed, a winner will be declared.

The competition is expected to run for approximately two years. Registration will be open throughout the competition.

Data Sets

Registered teams will be granted access to two separate datasets of de-identified patient claims data for developing and testing algorithms: a training dataset and a quiz/test dataset. The datasets will be comprised of de-identified patient data. The datasets will include:

  • Outpatient encounter data
  • Hospitalization encounter data
  • Medication dispensing claims data, including medications
  • Outpatient laboratory data, including test outcome values

The data for each de-identified patient will be organized into two sections: “Historical Data” and “Admission Data.” Historical Data will represent three years of past claims data. This section of the dataset will be used to predict if that patient is going to be admitted during the Admission Data period. Admission Data represents previous claims data and will contain whether or not a hospital admission occurred for that patient; it will be a binary flag.

DataThe training dataset includes several thousand anonymized patients and will be made available, securely and in full, to any registered team for the purpose of developing effective screening algorithms.

The quiz/test dataset is a smaller set of anonymized patients. Teams will only receive the Historical Data section of these datasets and the two datasets will be mixed together so that teams will not be aware of which de-identified patients are in which set. Teams will make predictions based on these data sets and submit their predictions to HPN through the official Heritage Health Prize web site. HPN will use the Quiz Dataset for the initial assessment of the Team’s algorithms. HPN will evaluate and report back scores to the teams through the prize website’s leader board.

Scores from the final Test Dataset will not be made available to teams until the accuracy thresholds are passed. The test dataset will be used in the final judging and results will be kept hidden. These scores are used to preserve the integrity of scoring and to help validate the predictive algorithms.

Teams can begin developing and testing their algorithms as soon as they are registered and ready. Teams will log onto the official Heritage Health Prize website and submit their predictions online. Comparisons will be run automatically and team accuracy scores will be posted on the leader board. This score will be only on a portion of the predictions submitted (the Quiz Dataset), the additional results will be kept back (the Test Dataset).

Form

Once a team successfully scores above the accuracy thresholds on the online testing (quiz dataset), final judging will occur. There will be three parts to this judging. First, the judges will confirm that the potential winning team’s algorithm accurately predicts patient admissions in the Test Dataset (again, above the thresholds for accuracy).

Next, the judging panel will confirm that the algorithm does not identify patients and use external data sources to derive its predictions. Lastly, the panel will confirm that the team’s algorithm is authentic and derives its predictive power from the datasets, not from hand-coding results to improve scores. If the algorithm meets these three criteria, it will be declared the winner.

Failure to meet any one of these three parts will disqualify the team and the contest will continue. The judges reserve the right to award second and third place prizes if deemed applicable.

 

From my bed- POEM

United States Army Center for Health Promotion...
Image via Wikipedia

Tucked in a hospital neatly sanitized

Stowed away from society in a medical compromise

Between the forces of destiny, decay and medical molecular action

Awaiting the prognosis as I am soundly exorcized

Grand delusions realistic illusions and promise of hope

Lift my mood when every other chemical has tried and failed

Prayer helps, so do online afar friendly people,

Hang on buddy, get back on track after being derailed

We need you more than your needers did

We love you more than any of your lovers will

Your dreadful prose, mundane wit, hilarious code

Have made you a daily part of our life though online still

Blog on, dog gone, be inspired, be still

Calmly heal, than slowly mend

We will wait with patience

Till your hospice stint will painless end.