Interview Jill Dyche Baseline Consulting

Here is an interview with Jill Dyche, co-Founder Baseline Consulting and one of the best Business Intelligence consultants and analysts. Her writing is read by huge portion of the industry and has influenced many paradigms.She is also Author of e-Data, The CRM Handbook, and Customer Data Integration: Reaching a Single Version of the Truth.

BI tools are not recommended when they’re the first topic in a BI discussion.

Jill Dyche, Baseline Consulting

Ajay- What approximate Return of Investment would you give to various vendors within Business Intelligence?

Jill- You don’t kid around do you, Ajay? In general the answer has everything to do with the problem BI is solving for a company. For instance, we’re working on deploying operational BI at a retailer right now. This new program is giving people in the stores more power to make decisions about promotions and in-store events. The projected ROI is $300,000 per store per year—and the retailer has over 1000 stores. In another example, we’re working with an HMO client on a master data management project that helps it reconcile patient data across hospitals, clinics, pharmacies, and home health care. The ROI could be life-saving. So, as they say in the Visa commercials: Priceless.

Ajay- What is impact of third party cloud storage and processing do you think will be there on Business Intelligence consulting?

Jill- There’s a lot of buzz about cloud storage for BI, most of it is coming from the VC community at this point, not from our clients. The trouble with that is that BI systems really need control over their storage. There are companies out there—check out a product called RainStor—that do BI storage in the cloud very well, and are optimized for it. But most “cloud” environments geared to BI are really just hosted offerings that provide clients with infrastructure and processing resources that they don’t have in-house.  Where the cloud really has benefits is when it provides significant processing power to companies that can’t build it easily themselves.

Ajay- What are the top writing tips would you give to young struggling business bloggers especially in this recession.

Jill- I’d advise bloggers to write like they talk, a standard admonishment by many a professor of Business Writing. So much of today’s business writing—especially in blogs—is stilted, overly-formal, and pedantic. I don’t care if your grammar is accurate; if your writing sounds like the Monroe Doctrine, no one will read it. (Just give me one quote from the Monroe Doctrine. See what I mean?) Don’t use the word “leverage” when you can use the word “use.” Be genuine and conversational. And avoid clichés like the plague.

Ajay-  How would you convince young people especially women to join more science careers. Describe your own career journey.

Jill- As much as we need those role models in science, high-tech, and math careers, I’d tell them to only embrace it if they really love it. My career path to high-tech was unconventional and unintentional. I started as a technical writer specializing in relational databases just as they were getting hot. One thing I know for sure is if you want to learn about something interesting, be willing to roll up your sleeves and work with it. My technical writing about databases, and then data warehouses, led to some pretty interesting client work.

Sure I’ve coded SQL in my career, and optimized some pretty hairy WHERE clauses. But the bigger issue is applying that work to business problems. Actually I’m grateful that I wasn’t a very good programmer. I’d still be waiting for that infinite loop to finish running.

Ajay- What are the areas within an enterprise where implementation of BI leads to the most gains. And when are BI tools not recommended?

Jill- The best opportunities for BI are for supporting business growth. And that typically means BI used by sales and marketing. Who’s the next customer and what will they buy? It’s answers to questions like these that can set a company apart competitively and contribute to both the top and bottom lines.

Not to be too heretical, but to answer your second question: BI tools are not recommended when they’re the first topic in a BI discussion. We’ve had several “Don’t go into the light” conversations with clients lately where they are prematurely looking at BI tools rather than examining their overall BI readiness. Companies need to be honest about their development processes, existing skill sets, and their data and platform infrastructures before they start phoning up data visualization vendors. Unfortunately, many people engage BI software vendors way before they’re ready.

Ajay- You and your partner Evan wrote what was really the first book on Master Data Management. But you’d been in the BI and data warehousing world before that. Why MDM?

Jill- We just kept watching what our clients couldn’t pull off with their data warehouses. We saw the effort they were going through to enforce business rules through ETL, and what they were trying to do to match records across different source systems. We also saw the amount of manual effort that went into things like handling survivor records, which leads to a series of conversations about data ownership.

Our book (Customer Data Integration: Reaching a Single Version of the Truth, Wiley) has as much to do with data management and data governance as it does with CDI and MDM. As Evan recently said in his presentation at the TDWI MDM Insight event, “You can’t master your data until you manage your data.” We really believe that, and our clients are starting to put it into practice too.

Ajay- Why did you and Evan choose to focus on customer master data (CDI) rather than a more general book on MDM?

Jill- There were two reasons. The first one was because other master data domains like product and location have their own unique sets of definitions and rules. Even though these domains also need MDM, they’re different and the details around implementing them and choosing vendor products to enable them are different. The second reason was that the vast majority of our clients started their MDM programs with customer data. One of Baseline’s longest legacies is enabling the proverbial “360-degree view” of customers. It’s what we knew.

Ajay- What’s surprised you most about your CDI/MDM clients?

Jill- The extent to which they use CDI and MDM as the context for bringing IT and the business closer together. You’d think BI would be ideal for that, and it is. But it’s interesting how MDM lets companies strip back a lot of the tool discussions and just focus on the raw conversations about definitions and rules for business data. Business people get why data is so important, and IT can help guide them in conversations about streamlining data quality and management. Companies like Dell have used MDM for nothing less than business alignment.

Ajay- Any plan to visit India and China for giving lectures?

Jill- I just turned down a trip to China this fall because I had a schedule conflict, which I’m really bummed about. Far as India is concerned, nothing yet but if you’re looking for houseguests let me know.(Ajay- sure I have a big brand new house just ready- and if I visit USA may I be a house guest too?)

About Jill Dyche-

Jill blogs at http://www.jilldyche.com/. where she takes the perpetual challenge of business-IT alignment head on in her trenchant, irreverent style.

Jill Dyché is a partner and co-founder of Baseline Consulting. Her role at Baseline is a combination of best-practice expert, industry gadfly, key client advisor, and all-around thought leader. She is responsible for key client strategies and market analysis in the areas of data governance, business intelligence, master data management, and customer relationship management. Jill counsels boards of directors on the strategic importance of their information investments.

Author

Jill is the author of three books on the business value of IT. Jill’s first book, e-Data (Addison Wesley, 2000) has been published in eight languages. She is a contributor to Impossible Data Warehouse Situations: Solutions from the Experts (Addison Wesley, 2002), and her book, The CRM Handbook (Addison Wesley, 2002), is the bestseller on the topic.

Jill’s work has been featured in major publications such as Computerworld, Information Week, CIO Magazine, the Wall Street Journal, the Chicago Tribune and Newsweek.com. Jill’s latest book, Customer Data Integration (John Wiley and Sons, 2006) was co-authored with Baseline partner Evan Levy, and shows the business breakthroughs achieved with integrated customer data.

Industry Expert

Jill is a featured speaker at industry conferences, university programs, and vendor events. She serves as a judge for several IT best practice awards. She is a member of the Society of Information Management and Women in Technology, a faculty member of TDWI, and serves as a co-chair for the MDM Insight conference. Jill is a columnist for DM Review, and a blogger for BeyeNETWORK and Baseline Consulting.

Interview Alison Bolen SAS.com

My biggest editing soapbox right now is to encourage brevity. We’re so used to writing white papers, brochures and magazine articles that the concept of throwing down 200 words on a topic from your day is a very foreign exercise. –

 

Alison Bolen  Editor-in-Chief sascom

Here is an interview with Alison Bolen the editor-in-chief of SAScom , online magazaine of the SAS Institute. Alison talks of the challenges in maintaining several of the topmost expertise blogs on SAS ,Business Analytics and Business Intelligence.

Ajay- Describe your career in the technology writing and publishing area. What advice would you give to young Web publishers and content producers just entering the job market in this recession? Describe your journey within SAS.

Alison- I started at SAS in 1999 as a summer student working as a contributing editor for SAS Communications magazine. Before the end of the year, I came on full time and soon transitioned to writing and editing for the Web. At that time, we were just developing the strategy for the customer support site and e-newsletters. As the first editor for the SAS Tech Report, I led marketing efforts that brought in 15,000 opt-in subscribers within six months. A year later, I switched to writing and editing customer success stories, which I enjoyed doing until I took on the role of Editor-in-Chief for sascom® magazine in 2006. We started our blogging program in 2007, and I’ve been actively involved in coaching SAS bloggers for the past two years.

Outside of SAS, I’ve written for Southwest Hydrology Magazine, the Arizona Daily Star and other regional papers. My bachelor’s degree is in magazine journalism and my master’s degree is in technical and business communications.

If you’re just beginning your career as a writer, start a blog and stick with it. There’s no better way to get daily writing practice, learn the basics of search engine optimization and start to understand what works online.

Ajay www.SAS.com/Blogs has many, many blogs by experts, RSS feeds and even covers the annual SAS conference with video content. In terms of social media adaptation, what prompts you to stay ahead of the competition in ensuring marketing and technical communications for brand awareness?

What do you think are the basics of setting up a social media presence for a company, regardless of size?

Alison- Social media excites me because you can cut through the clutter and be real. Our new business forecasting blog by Michael Gilliland is a good example. Teaching people how to forecast better is his top priority, not selling software. Our overarching goal for the blogging program is similar: to share and develop expertise.

We’re big advocates of aligning your social media presence with existing marketing goals. We have a few grass-roots teams interested in social media, and we have a director-level Marketing 2.0 Council that our Social Media Manager Dave Thomas leads to determine broad guidelines and strategies. But the overarching concept is to look at the goals of your individual marketing campaigns first, and then determine which social media channels might help you reach those goals.

Most of all, take off your marketing hat when you enter the blog, network or forum. Social media consists of individuals, for the most part, and not companies, so be sure to offer value as a colleague and build relationships.

Ajay- I noticed that SAS.com/ Blogs are almost ad free – even of SAS products – apart from a simple banner of the company. Was this a deliberate decision, and if so, why?

Alison- Yes, most of the SAS blogs were intentionally created to help establish the individual blogger’s expertise – not to promote SAS products or services. One positive side effect is that SAS – by extension – builds credibility as well. But we really do see the blogs as a place to discuss concepts and ideas more than products and tools.

Ajay- What distinguishes good writers on blogs from bad writers on blogs? How about some tips for technical blog writing and especially editing (since many writers need editors more than they realize)?

Alison- The best blog writers know how to simplify and explain even the most mundane, everyday processes. This is true of personal and technical blog writing. If you can look at your life or your work and see what piece of it others would find interesting or want to know more about – and then know how to describe that sliver of yourself clearly – you have what it takes to be a good blogger. Chris Hemedinger does this well on The SAS Dummy blog.

My biggest editing soapbox right now is to encourage brevity. We’re so used to writing white papers, brochures and magazine articles at SAS that the concept of throwing down 200 words on a random topic from your day is a very foreign exercise. You have to learn how to edit your day – not just your writing – to find those topics and distill those thoughts into quick snippets that keep readers interested. And don’t forget it’s okay to have fun!

Ajay- I balance one blog, small consulting assignments and being a stay-at-home dad for an 18-month old. How easy is it for you to balance being editor of sascom, given the huge content your sites create, and three kids? Does working for SAS and its employee-friendly reputation help you do so?

Alison- I couldn’t balance work and kids without a whole lot of help from friends and family, that’s for sure. And the employee-friendly benefits help too. The biggest benefit is the cultural mindset, though, not any individual policy. My boss and my boss’ boss are both working mothers, and they’re balancing the same types of schedules. There’s an understanding about finding a healthy work-life balance that permeates SAS from top to bottom.

Ajay- As a social media consultant it is a weekly struggle for me to convince companies to discontinue registration for normal content (but keep it for special events), use a lot more video tutorials and share content freely across the Web. Above all, convincing busy senior managers to start writing a blog or an article is an exercise in diplomacy itself. How do you convince senior managers to devote time to content creation?

Alison- In a lot of areas, the content is already being created for analyst presentations, press interviews and consulting briefs. It’s really a matter of understanding how to take those existing materials and re-present them in a more personal voice. Not everyone can – or should – do it. You have to decide if you have the voice for it and whether or not it will bring you value beyond what you’re getting through your existing channels.

Ajay- Any plans to visit India and have a SAS India blogathon?

Alison- Alas, not this year.

Maybe I will visit Cary,NC then 🙂


Bio:
Alison Bolen is the Editor of sascom magazine and the sascom voices blog, where SAS experts publish their thoughts on popular and emerging business and technology trends worldwide. Since starting at SAS in 1999, Alison has edited print publications, Web sites, e-newsletters, customer success stories and blogs.

Alison holds a bachelor’s degree in magazine journalism from Ohio University and a master’s degree in technical writing from North Carolina State University.

1) Describe your career in the technology writing and publishing area. What advice would you give to young Web publishers and content producers just entering the job market in this recession? Describe your journey within SAS.

I started at SAS in 1999 as a summer student working as a contributing editor for SAS Communications magazine. Before the end of the year, I came on full time and soon transitioned to writing and editing for the Web. At that time, we were just developing the strategy for the customer support site and e-newsletters. As the first editor for the SAS Tech Report, I led marketing efforts that brought in 15,000 opt-in subscribers within six months. A year later, I switched to writing and editing customer success stories, which I enjoyed doing until I took on the role of Editor-in-Chief for sascom® magazine in 2006. We started our blogging program in 2007, and I’ve been actively involved in coaching SAS bloggers for the past two years.

Outside of SAS, I’ve written for Southwest Hydrology Magazine, the Arizona Daily Star and other regional papers. My bachelor’s degree is in magazine journalism and my master’s degree is in technical and business communications.

If you’re just beginning your career as a writer, start a blog and stick with it. There’s no better way to get daily writing practice, learn the basics of search engine optimization and start to understand what works online.
2) SAS.com/Blogs has many, many blogs by experts, RSS feeds and even covers the annual SAS conference with video content. In terms of social media adaptation, what prompts you to stay ahead of the competition in ensuring marketing and technical communications for brand awareness?

What do you think are the basics of setting up a social media presence for a company, regardless of size?

Social media excites me because you can cut through the clutter and be real. Our new business forecasting blog by Michael Gilliland is a good example. Teaching people how to forecast better is his top priority, not selling software. Our overarching goal for the blogging program is similar: to share and develop expertise.

We’re big advocates of aligning your social media presence with existing marketing goals. We have a few grass-roots teams interested in social media, and we have a director-level Marketing 2.0 Council that our Social Media Manager Dave Thomas leads to determine broad guidelines and strategies. But the overarching concept is to look at the goals of your individual marketing campaigns first, and then determine which social media channels might help you reach those goals.

Most of all, take off your marketing hat when you enter the blog, network or forum. Social media consists of individuals, for the most part, and not companies, so be sure to offer value as a colleague and build relationships.


3) I noticed that SAS.com/ Blogs are almost ad free – even of SAS products – apart from a simple banner of the company. Was this a deliberate decision, and if so, why?

Yes, most of the SAS blogs were intentionally created to help establish the individual blogger’s expertise – not to promote SAS products or services. One positive side effect is that SAS – by extension – builds credibility as well. But we really do see the blogs as a place to discuss concepts and ideas more than products and tools.
4) What distinguishes good writers on blogs from bad writers on blogs? How about some tips for technical blog writing and especially editing (since many writers need editors more than they realize)?

The best blog writers know how to simplify and explain even the most mundane, everyday processes. This is true of personal and technical blog writing. If you can look at your life or your work and see what piece of it others would find interesting or want to know more about – and then know how to describe that sliver of yourself clearly – you have what it takes to be a good blogger. Chris Hemedinger does this well on The SAS Dummy blog.

My biggest editing soapbox right now is to encourage brevity. We’re so used to writing white papers, brochures and magazine articles at SAS that the concept of throwing down 200 words on a random topic from your day is a very foreign exercise. You have to learn how to edit your day – not just your writing – to find those topics and distill those thoughts into quick snippets that keep readers interested. And don’t forget it’s okay to have fun!
5) I balance one blog, small consulting assignments and being a stay-at-home dad for an 18-month old. How easy is it for you to balance being editor of sascom, given the huge content your sites create, and three kids? Does working for SAS and its employee-friendly reputation help you do so?

I couldn’t balance work and kids without a whole lot of help from friends and family, that’s for sure. And the employee-friendly benefits help too. The biggest benefit is the cultural mindset, though, not any individual policy. My boss and my boss’ boss are both working mothers, and they’re balancing the same types of schedules. There’s an understanding about finding a healthy work-life balance that permeates SAS from top to bottom.

6) As a social media consultant it is a weekly struggle for me to convince companies to discontinue registration for normal content (but keep it for special events), use a lot more video tutorials and share content freely across the Web. Above all, convincing busy senior managers to start writing a blog or an article is an exercise in diplomacy itself. How do you convince senior managers to devote time to content creation?

In a lot of areas, the content is already being created for analyst presentations, press interviews and consulting briefs. It’s really a matter of understanding how to take those existing materials and re-present them in a more personal voice. Not everyone can – or should – do it. You have to decide if you have the voice for it and whether or not it will bring you value beyond what you’re getting through your existing channels.

7) Any plans to visit India and have a SAS India blogathon?

Alas, not this year.

The Great Driving Challenge- coolest young couples

Here is one of the new startups in India. A batch mate from B school whom I owe too many beers, and too few

calculus notes —–well he asked me to help him vote. Treat this as shameless self promotion just like http://www.cerebralmastication.com/ ‘s moustache and R rated R stats profanity on #rstats in twitter

Please do vote and read- they are a fun couple. http://www.greatdrivingchallenge.com/application/1245656268196502/

The Great Driving Challenge

KDD 2009 is now open !!!!!

https://i2.wp.com/www.sigkdd.org/kdd2009/images/title.jpg
http://www.sigkdd.org/kdd2009/images/title.jpg

KXEN remains a GOLDEN sponser

Knowledge Extraction Engines

General Chair John Elder (Elder Research, Inc.)
Francoise Soulie Fogelman (KXEN)
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I asked Francoise in her interview this March on  (http://www.decisionstats.com/2009/03/27/interview-franoise-soulie-fogelman-kxen/ ) oh her views on data mining and how KXEN fits in and here is an extract –

Ajay –What kind of hardware solutions go best with KXEN’s software. What are the other BI vendors that your offerings best complement with.

Françoise – KXEN software in general and KSN in particular, run on any platform. When using KSN to build decent size graphs (with tens of millions of nodes and hundreds of millions of links for example), 64 bits architecture is required. A recent survey of KXEN customers show that the BI suites used by our customers are mostly MicroStrategy and Business Objects (SAP). We also like very much to mention Advizor Solutions which offers data visualization software already embedding KXEN technology.

Francoise of course is well versed to be talking on Knowledge Discovery and Data mining. – her credentials are kind of awe inspiring

Ms Soulie Fogelman has over 30 years of experience in data mining and CRM both from an academic and a business perspective. Prior to KXEN, she directed the first French research team on Neural Networks at Paris 11 University where she was a CS Professor. She then co-founded Mimetics, a start-up that processes and sells development environment, optical character recognition (OCR) products and services using neural network technology, and became its Chief Scientific Officer. After that she started the Data Mining and CRM group at Atos Origin and, most recently, she created and managed the CRM Agency for Business & Decision, a French IS company specialized in Business Intelligence and CRM.

Ms Soulie Fogelman holds a master’s degree in mathematics from Ecole Normale Superieure and a PhD in Computer Science from University of Grenoble. She was advisor to over 20 PhD on data mining, has authored more than 100 scientific papers and books and has been an invited speaker to many academic and b
business events.

Disclaimer- I have been both a KXEn client, user, as well as vendor.


Personal: My Son the Blogger

My 20 something son has decided to blog at http://www.kushohri.com.

These kids!

This is a archive content

Happy new Year

January 2nd, 2009

This is the second time I am seeing a Happy New Year. It gets difficult to see New year in delhi, when covered within 3 sweaters ,warmers,cap and delhi fog.

Sorry, didnt blog for some time. Dad went to US and brought me lots of clothes in October 2008.Chachu bought me a toy train from London, which dad said is too big and too good so I havent gotten it. Dad  likes my toys sometimes more than I do. Boys will be boys.

In October , I learnt to walk, and by today I am happily running and getting into trouble.Also grand ma decided no more creche and I got a new didi, or baby sitter called S..

Dadi and Dadu went to Chachu’s place in Mumbai in December , so I missed them. They are back now.

Anyways, happy new blogging year.

Gotta run !

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Kush starts to walk

September 10th, 2008

How many miles must a baby crawl, before he decides to stand.

The answer my friend , is blowing in the wind. The answer is blowing in the wind.

I decide to walk. Mom and Dad went all uh ah .Dad shot a video and uploaded it on Facebook

My chachu, Dad’s younger borther is London bound so he couldnt see the photos.

So he gets to see videos.

Walking means falling on bum lots of time. It also means able to do more mischief like climbing on tables,

pulling Dads computer (note from Dad-grrrrr) .

My grand ma gets worried when I fall though. She is very sweet , her skin is quite wrinkly.

Dont know why but babies enjoy old peoples company more. They are more relaxed.

Grownups are always rushing from here -there….

Pause dear Grwon up. Go home and watch your kids play.

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Birthday Number 1

September 5th, 2008

Kush turned 1 on this day. Its like his age was zero and now its one.

Grand Dad had big tent, lots of visitors who kind of hold on to me, till I shout or fake cries.

Dad forgot to put batteries in camera.

The morning party at day care centre was better.

The worse thing about turning 1— so much cake , and you dont get even one bite to eat.

Grrrrr

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Measles Day 3-6

September 1st, 2008

Measles is over now. Mom rubbed a lot of cream, I got to do lots of fun.

I lost some weight though, and that kind of worried Dad. On Day 5, MOM took me to temple with DAD an SUPER DAD or Grand Dad, and there we said a prayer and priest sprinkled some milk drops on me.

Measles and Milk drops. This happens . in.India.

Super Dad is planning my 1 birthday next week. Its apparently a big deal, with lots of tents,cooks, guests etc coming in. I dunno. I love parties dedicated to me , like my Lohri party in January.

Also, my hair is kind of growing so Mom made some ponytail. Everyone says I look nice in it.

I hate it.

Takes me 2 secs to rub it down.

We have  a new maid called Sharmila didi. I play with her too when Dad is beating stuff on his bumputer

and mom is cooking. Apparently she is a Kushu-sitter (because I think Kushu is no baby )

Day 7- Off To Creche.

Vacations over.

Wah Wah Wah…

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Measles Day 2.0

August 26th, 2008

Measles day 2 was ok dokey.

I got to sleep late. Mommy took day off, so no creche for me.I stay at creche , mommy goota finish her med school (job and study)

Pappa ’s pretty useless. Just wringes his hands. Says he is on part day off-on. Works from home anyways.

On his big box bumputer.

Extra care from maama is worth the measles . But these spots on face kind of itchy.

And the medicine….well they should be tested on doctors….grrrrr

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Measles

August 25th, 2008

Kush got measles.

Despite the booster he got at 9 months. From his mom whos a docter.

Despite all the love ,care and babysitting. from the grown up known as Dad.

So he is all cry cry. And turning pink.

Measles is tough .

But the grownups are suddenly loving me more.

He he.He.

Maybe I can get to eat  Daddys mobile phone now

But Baby jokes apart.

This is just day 1,

Daddy will take two days off.

and I am off to Grandpa’s for extra tender loving care.

Please pray for me to get well.

Feeling sleepy again..these medicines …and that pointy pin jenction hurrrrt.

Granpas is cool , and was planning my Bday party next week. But lets see.

back to baby bed.

Tags:
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Papa ’s Big Idea

August 25th, 2008

Cause these food stamps dont buy diapers

Marshal Mathhers

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viral fever and rashes

August 23rd, 2008

for two weeks i had something called diaper rash. daddy calls it my red monkey bum. funny to him maybe.

it hurts when i get powdered, then it becomes white monkey bum.

and it has started raining. that means water from sky. water from my stomachs below i barely understand. water from above is even more strange. see my photo in post 1.

so i got fever, and so rush to docter, and daddy mommy worried, and bitter medicine….

life can be tough for a baby. thats when kushu decided to sleep it off. like right now. too much typing ….

kushu s time to sleep…

good bye grown up world…here comes baby sleep world…..

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Kush is in trouble with daddy

August 23rd, 2008

Kush is in some kind of trouble with daddy.

It all started when daddy started spending way too much time in front of white box with black thing and shiny ball. he calls it his computer. i call it daddy’s toy.

so one day i came crawling , stood straight and pushed at the shiny box below. it fell down tih thud. daddy started shouting my cpu my cpu.

this was too much for me to bear so i started crying.

anyway the cpu seems okay now and daddy is back to his B L O O G I N

so sometimes I knock on his door when inside

sometime i happen to stand near him when water comes from my tummy below (water always come suddenly from there)

he doesnt like it especially when i broke 2 keys of his keyboard

daddy play with kushu. not with computer.

ah these grown ups.

Tags: , ,
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11 months ago

August 6th, 2008

I was born 11 months ago. Slowly my neck, my head, my legs , my hands started moving.

I can even stand now..though I need more work on my quadriceps. (I shake when I stand..crawling is kind of better)

Being born means taken out of nice ,warm place to strange place of voices that go “000 …000″, Milk, Milk…and daily bath.

Babies dont like daily baths. I dont, but I have gotten used to it now.

Last week, I had strange sound in throat.

Big tall people, called grown ups started acting funny..taking me here , there.

They said I was sick.

I love my my moma ,and popa though.

They are kinda fun, except when they make stop me crawling ,drink or take a bath.

The love kind of softens when they force bitter liquids after every three hours, saying “oooo…Oooo”

Lots of really nasty liquids later, I am ok and not so sick.

The World in my eyes , is of two types of people.

Big Tall people who speak a lot, and tiny small people who cant speak.But that is changing….

Life is beautiful

July 30th, 2008

I used to be here

but then came life …..

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Hello World!

July 26th, 2008

Hello I am Kush.

11 Months old.

The World’s Youngest Blogger.


Watch this space.

The World\'s Youngest Blogger

Coming Soon www.kushohri.com (As Narated by the grown up also known as DAD)

How NOT to ask Questions/ Comments

I got this great website from Joshua Reich of i2pi

Basically it tells newbies on how to get better effective help online while learning new tech stuff, by lucidly explaining basic community volunteer behaviour.

Citation:http://catb.org/~esr/faqs/smart-questions.html

Rodin_TheThinker

hackers have a reputation for meeting simple questions with what looks like hostility or arrogance. It sometimes looks like we’re reflexively rude to newbies and the ignorant. But this isn’t really true.What we are, unapologetically, is hostile to people who seem to be unwilling to think or to do their own homework before asking questions. People like that are time sinks — they take without giving back, and they waste time we could have spent on another question more interesting and another person more worthy of an answer. We call people like this “losers” (and for historical reasons we sometimes spell it “lusers”).

We realize that there are many people who just want to use the software we write, and who have no interest in learning technical details. For most people, a computer is merely a tool, a means to an end; they have more important things to do and lives to live. We acknowledge that, and don’t expect everyone to take an interest in the technical matters that fascinate us. Nevertheless, our style of answering questions is tuned for people who do take such an interest and are willing to be active participants in problem-solving. That’s not going to change. Nor should it; if it did, we would become less effective at the things we do best.

We’re (largely) volunteers. We take time out of busy lives to answer questions, and at times we’re overwhelmed with them. So we filter ruthlessly. In particular, we throw away questions from people who appear to be losers in order to spend our question-answering time more efficiently, on winners.

Kind of explains why Bloggers delete some comments on  blogs as well 😉

Image Source: wikimedia.org


R and SAS in Twitter Land

A tale of two languages ( set in Twitterland)

Everytime I post to the R help list, if the email contains the three words S.- A – S , I get plenty of e-spanking from senior professors and distinguished Linux people. On the other hand when I mentioned W-P-S I got dunked by the Don of SAS Global himself. We geeks are so passionate.

Here is some new stuff on Twitter for the R /Open Source community.

1) I manually made a list of

  1. best R blogs,
  2. R help lists ( on Nabble since Google Groups banned R help archive),
  3. Twitter Search for #rstats ( general search word for R)

I then copied the RSS feeds of each of the above.

2) I then went to www.twitterfeed.com (uses open Id) and linked a new Twitter Account to these RSS feeds

Screenshot-twitterfeed.com : feed your blog to twitter - Mozilla Firefox

3) I then tweaked the layout and added #rstats before each post to the new R resource http://twitter.com/Rarchive

http://twitter.com/Rarchive
http://twitter.com/Rarchive

If you are a tweeter you can follow it here http://twitter.com/Rarchive and never miss any R news going forward.

ps- I also did the same for sas for http://twitter.com/sascommunity

UPDATE

#rstats helps in SEO in Google since Google uses Twitter search as well. Existing best R search engine is http://rseek.com
In any case it is too late to change now since this is more like a automated firehose. Now you can use #rstats as well additional keywords to get more searchable useful stuff.

NOTE______

http://twitter.com/sas belongs to a guy who is wondering who is trying to hack his twitter account

, well you can check the screen shot below

Screenshot-Sky Sutton (SAS) on Twitter - Mozilla Firefox
Screenshot-Sky Sutton (SAS) on Twitter - Mozilla Firefox