Rapid Miner User Conference 2012

One of those cool conferences that is on my bucket list- this time in Hungary (That’s a nice place)

But I am especially interested in seeing how far Radoop has come along !

Disclaimer- Rapid Miner has been a Decisionstats.com sponsor  for many years. It is also a very cool software but I like the R Extension facility even more!


and not very expensive too compared to other User Conferences in Europe!-


Information about Registration

  • Early Bird registration until July 20th, 2012.
  • Normal registration from July 21st, 2012 until August 13th, 2012.
  • Latest registration from August 14th, 2012 until August 24th, 2012.
  • Students have to provide a valid Student ID during registration.
  • The Dinner is included in the All Days and in the Conference packages.
  • All prices below are net prices. Value added tax (VAT) has to be added if applicable.

Prices for Regular Visitors

Days and Event
Early Bird Rate
Normal Rate
Latest Registration

(Training / Development 1)

190 Euro 230 Euro 280 Euro
Wednesday + Thursday


290 Euro 350 Euro 420 Euro

(Training / Development 2 and Exam)

190 Euro 230 Euro 280 Euro
All Days

(Full Package)

610 Euro 740 Euro 900 Euro

Prices for Authors and Students

In case of students, please note that you will have to provide a valid student ID during registration.

Days and Event
Early Bird Rate
Normal Rate
Latest Registration

(Training / Development 1)

90 Euro 110 Euro 140 Euro
Wednesday + Thursday


140 Euro 170 Euro 210 Euro

(Training / Development 2 and Exam)

90 Euro 110 Euro 140 Euro
All Days

(Full Package)

290 Euro 350 Euro 450 Euro
Training / Workshop 1
Conference 1
Conference 2
Training / Workshop 2
09:00 – 10:30
Introductory Speech
Ingo Mierswa; Rapid-I 

Data Analysis


NeurophRM: Integration of the Neuroph framework into RapidMiner
Miloš Jovanović, Jelena Stojanović, Milan Vukićević, Vera Stojanović, Boris Delibašić (University of Belgrade)

To be announced (Invited Talk)
To be announced


Recommender Systems


Extending RapidMiner with Recommender Systems Algorithms
Matej Mihelčić, Nino Antulov-Fantulin, Matko Bošnjak, Tomislav Šmuc (Ruđer Bošković Institute)

Implementation of User Based Collaborative Filtering in RapidMiner
Sérgio Morais, Carlos Soares (Universidade do Porto)

Parallel Training / Workshop Session

Advanced Data Mining and Data Transformations


Development Workshop Part 2

10:30 – 12:30
Data Analysis

Nearest-Neighbor and Clustering based Anomaly Detection Algorithms for RapidMiner
Mennatallah Amer, Markus Goldstein (DFKI)

Customers’ LifeStyle Targeting on Big Data using Rapid Miner
Maksim Drobyshev (LifeStyle Marketing Ltd)

Robust GPGPU Plugin Development for RapidMiner
Andor Kovács, Zoltán Prekopcsák (Budapest University of Technology and Economics)


Image Mining Extension – Year After
Radim Burget, Václav Uher, Jan Mašek (Brno University of Technology)

Incorporating R Plots into RapidMiner Reports
Peter Jeszenszky (University of Debrecen)

An Octave Extension for RapidMiner
Sylvain Marié (Schneider Electric)

12:30 – 13:30
13:30 – 15:00
Parallel Training / Workshop Session

Basic Data Mining and Data Transformations


Development Workshop Part 1


Application of RapidMiner in Steel Industry Research and Development
Bengt-Henning Maas, Hakan Koc, Martin Bretschneider (Salzgitter Mannesmann Forschung)

A Comparison of Data-driven Models for Forecast River Flow
Milan Cisty, Juraj Bezak (Slovak University of Technology)

Portfolio Optimization Using Local Linear Regression Ensembles in Rapid Miner
Gábor Nagy, Tamás Henk, Gergő Barta (Budapest University of Technology and Economics)

Unstructured Data

Processing Data Streams with the RapidMiner Streams-Plugin
Christian Bockermann, Hendrik Blom (TU Dortmund)

Automated Creation of Corpuses for the Needs of Sentiment Analysis
Peter Koncz, Jan Paralic (Technical University of Kosice)




News from the Rapid-I Labs
Simon Fischer; Rapid-I

This short session demonstrates the latest developments from the Rapid-I lab and will let you how you can build powerful analysis processes and routines by using those RapidMiner tools.

Certification Exam
15:00 – 17:00
Book Presentation and Game Show

Data Mining for the Masses: A New Textbook on Data Mining for Everyone
Matthew North (Washington & Jefferson College)

Matthew North presents his new book “Data Mining for the Masses” introducing data mining to a broader audience and making use of RapidMiner for practical data mining problems.


Game Show
Did you miss last years’ game show “Who wants to be a data miner?”? Use RapidMiner for problems it was never created for and beat the time and other contestants!

User Support

Get some Coffee for free – Writing Operators with RapidMiner Beans
Christian Bockermann, Hendrik Blom (TU Dortmund)

Meta-Modeling Execution Times of RapidMiner operators
Matija Piškorec, Matko Bošnjak, Tomislav Šmuc (Ruđer Bošković Institute) 

Social Event (Conference Dinner)
Social Event (Visit of Bar District)


Training: Basic Data Mining and Data Transformations

This is a short introductory training course for users who are not yet familiar with RapidMiner or only have a few experiences with RapidMiner so far. The topics of this training session include

  • Basic Usage
    • User Interface
    • Creating and handling RapidMiner repositories
    • Starting a new RapidMiner project
    • Operators and processes
    • Loading data from flat files
    • Storing data, processes, and results
  • Predictive Models
    • Linear Regression
    • Naïve Bayes
    • Decision Trees
  • Basic Data Transformations
    • Changing names and roles
    • Handling missing values
    • Changing value types by discretization and dichotimization
    • Normalization and standardization
    • Filtering examples and attributes
  • Scoring and Model Evaluation
    • Applying models
    • Splitting data
    • Evaluation methods
    • Performance criteria
    • Visualizing Model Performance


Training: Advanced Data Mining and Data Transformations

This is a short introductory training course for users who already know some basic concepts of RapidMiner and data mining and have already used the software before, for example in the first training on Tuesday. The topics of this training session include

  • Advanced Data Handling
    • Sampling
    • Balancing data
    • Joins and Aggregations
    • Detection and removal of outliers
    • Dimensionality reduction
  • Control process execution
    • Remember process results
    • Recall process results
    • Loops
    • Using branches and conditions
    • Exception handling
    • Definition of macros
    • Usage of macros
    • Definition of log values
    • Clearing log tables
    • Transforming log tables to data


Development Workshop Part 1 and Part 2

Want to exchange ideas with the developers of RapidMiner? Or learn more tricks for developing own operators and extensions? During our development workshops on Tuesday and Friday, we will build small groups of developers each working on a small development project around RapidMiner. Beginners will get a comprehensive overview of the architecture of RapidMiner before making the first steps and learn how to write own operators. Advanced developers will form groups with our experienced developers, identify shortcomings of RapidMiner and develop a new extension which might be presented during the conference already. Unfinished work can be continued in the second workshop on Friday before results might be published on the Marketplace or can be taken home as a starting point for new custom operators.

send email by R

For automated report delivery I have often used send email options in BASE SAS. For R, for scheduling tasks and sending me automated mails on completion of tasks I have two R options and 1 Windows OS scheduling option. Note red font denotes the parameters that should be changed. Anything else should NOT be changed.

Option 1-

Use the mail package at


> library(mail)

Attaching package: ‘mail’

The following object(s) are masked from ‘package:sendmailR’:


> sendmail(“ohri2007@gmail.com“, subject=”Notification from R“,message=“Calculation finished!”, password=”rmail”)
[1] “Message was sent to ohri2007@gmail.com! You have 19 messages left.”

Disadvantage- Only 20 email messages by IP address per day. (but thats ok!)

Option 2-

use sendmailR package at http://cran.r-project.org/web/packages/sendmailR/sendmailR.pdf

from <- sprintf(“<sendmailR@%s>”, Sys.info()[4])
to <- “<ohri2007@gmail.com>”
subject <- “Hello from R
body <- list(“It works!”, mime_part(iris))
sendmail(from, to, subject, body,control=list(smtpServer=”ASPMX.L.GOOGLE.COM”))



BiocInstaller version 1.2.1, ?biocLite for help
> install.packages(“sendmailR”)
Installing package(s) into ‘/home/ubuntu/R/library’
(as ‘lib’ is unspecified)
also installing the dependency ‘base64’

trying URL ‘http://cran.at.r-project.org/src/contrib/base64_1.1.tar.gz&#8217;
Content type ‘application/x-gzip’ length 61109 bytes (59 Kb)
opened URL
downloaded 59 Kb

trying URL ‘http://cran.at.r-project.org/src/contrib/sendmailR_1.1-1.tar.gz&#8217;
Content type ‘application/x-gzip’ length 6399 bytes
opened URL
downloaded 6399 bytes

BiocInstaller version 1.2.1, ?biocLite for help
* installing *source* package ‘base64’ …
** package ‘base64’ successfully unpacked and MD5 sums checked
** libs
gcc -std=gnu99 -I/usr/local/lib64/R/include -I/usr/local/include -fpic -g -O2 -c base64.c -o base64.o
gcc -std=gnu99 -shared -L/usr/local/lib64 -o base64.so base64.o -L/usr/local/lib64/R/lib -lR
installing to /home/ubuntu/R/library/base64/libs
** R
** preparing package for lazy loading
** help
*** installing help indices
** building package indices …
** testing if installed package can be loaded
BiocInstaller version 1.2.1, ?biocLite for help

* DONE (base64)
BiocInstaller version 1.2.1, ?biocLite for help
* installing *source* package ‘sendmailR’ …
** package ‘sendmailR’ successfully unpacked and MD5 sums checked
** R
** preparing package for lazy loading
** help
*** installing help indices
** building package indices …
** testing if installed package can be loaded
BiocInstaller version 1.2.1, ?biocLite for help

* DONE (sendmailR)

The downloaded packages are in
> library(sendmailR)
Loading required package: base64
> from <- sprintf(“<sendmailR@%s>”, Sys.info()[4])
> to <- “<ohri2007@gmail.com>”
> subject <- “Hello from R”
> body <- list(“It works!”, mime_part(iris))
> sendmail(from, to, subject, body,
+ control=list(smtpServer=”ASPMX.L.GOOGLE.COM”))
[1] “221”

[1] “2.0.0 closing connection ff2si17226764qab.40”

Disadvantage-This worked when I used the Amazon Cloud using the BioConductor AMI (for free 2 hours) at http://www.bioconductor.org/help/cloud/

It did NOT work when I tried it use it from my Windows 7 Home Premium PC from my Indian ISP (!!) .

It gave me this error

or in wait_for(250) :
SMTP Error: 5.7.1 [] The IP you’re using to send mail is not authorized



ps Why do this (send email by R)?

Note you can add either of the two programs of the end of the code that you want to be notified automatically. (like daily tasks)

This is mostly done for repeated business analytics tasks (like reports and analysis that need to be run at specific periods of time)

pps- What else can I do with this?

Can be modified to include sms or tweets  or even blog by email by modifying the   “to”  location appropriately.

3) Using Windows Task Scheduler to run R codes automatically (either the above)

or just sending an email

got to Start>  All Programs > Accessories >System Tools > Task Scheduler ( or by default C:Windowssystem32taskschd.msc)

Create a basic task

Now you can use this to run your daily/or scheduled R code  or you can send yourself email as well.

and modify the parameters- note the SMTP server (you can use the ones for google in example 2 at ASPMX.L.GOOGLE.COM)

and check if it works!



 Geeky Things , Bro

Configuring IIS on your Windows 7 Home Edition-

note path to do this is-

Control Panel>All Control Panel Items> Program and Features>Turn Windows features on or off> Internet Information Services




Interview: Hjálmar Gíslason, CEO of DataMarket.com

Here is an interview with Hjálmar Gíslason, CEO of Datamarket.com  . DataMarket is an active marketplace for structured data and statistics. Through powerful search and visual data exploration, DataMarket connects data seekers with data providers.


Ajay-  Describe your journey as an entrepreneur and techie in Iceland. What are the 10 things that surprised you most as a tech entrepreneur.

HG- DataMarket is my fourth tech start-up since at age 20 in 1996. The previous ones have been in gaming, mobile and web search. I come from a technical background but have been moving more and more to the business side over the years. I can still prototype, but I hope there isn’t a single line of my code in production!

Funny you should ask about the 10 things that have surprised me the most on this journey, as I gave a presentation – literally yesterday – titled: “9 things nobody told me about the start-up business”

They are:
* Do NOT generalize – especially not to begin with
* Prioritize – and find a work-flow that works for you
* Meet people – face to face
* You are a sales person – whether you like it or not
* Technology is not a product – it’s the entire experience
* Sell the current version – no matter how amazing the next one is
* Learn from mistakes – preferably others’
* Pick the right people – good people is not enough
* Tell a good story – but don’t make them up

I obviously elaborate on each of these points in the talk, but the points illustrate roughly some of the things I believe I’ve learned … so far 😉

9 things nobody told me about the start-up business


Both Amazon  and Google  have entered the public datasets space. Infochimps  has 14,000+ public datasets. The US has http://www.data.gov/

So clearly the space is both competitive and yet the demand for public data repositories is clearly under served still. 

How does DataMarket intend to address this market in a unique way to differentiate itself from others.

HG- DataMarket is about delivering business data to decision makers. We help data seekers find the data they need for planning and informed decision making, and data publishers reaching this audience. DataMarket.com is the meeting point, where data seekers can come to find the best available data, and data publishers can make their data available whether for free or for a fee. We’ve populated the site with a wealth of data from public sources such as the UN, Eurostat, World Bank, IMF and others, but there is also premium data that is only available to those that subscribe to and pay for the access. For example we resell the entire data offering from the EIU (Economist Intelligence Unit) (link: http://datamarket.com/data/list/?q=provider:eiu)

DataMarket.com allows all this data to be searched, visualized, compared and downloaded in a single place in a standard, unified manner.

We see many of these efforts not as competition, but as valuable potential sources of data for our offering, while others may be competing with parts of our proposition, such as easy access to the public data sets.


Ajay- What are your views on data confidentiality and access to data owned by Governments funded by tax payer money.

HG- My views are very simple: Any data that is gathered or created for taxpayers’ money should be open and free of charge unless higher priorities such as privacy or national security indicate otherwise.

Reflecting that, any data that is originally open and free of charge is still open and free of charge on DataMarket.com, just easier to find and work with.

Ajay-  How is the technology entrepreneurship and venture capital scene in Iceland. What things work and what things can be improved?

HG- The scene is quite vibrant, given the small community. Good teams with promising concepts have been able to get the funding they need to get started and test their footing internationally. When the rapid growth phase is reached outside funding may still be needed.

There are positive and negative things about any location. Among the good things about Iceland from the stand point of a technology start-up are highly skilled tech people and a relatively simple corporate environment. Among the bad things are a tiny local market, lack of skills in international sales and marketing and capital controls that were put in place after the crash of the Icelandic economy in 2008.

I’ve jokingly said that if a company is hot in the eyes of VCs it would get funding even if it was located in the jungles of Congo, while if they’re only lukewarm towards you, they will be looking for any excuse not to invest. Location can certainly be one of them, and in that case being close to the investor communities – physically – can be very important.

We’re opening up our sales and marketing offices in Boston as we speak. Not to be close to investors though, but to be close to our market and current customers.

Ajay- Describe your hobbies when you are not founding amazing tech startups.

HG- Most of my time is spent working – which happens to by my number one hobby.

It is still important to step away from it all every now and then to see things in perspective and come back with a clear mind.

I *love* traveling to exotic places. Me and my wife have done quite a lot of traveling in Africa and S-America: safari, scuba diving, skiing, enjoying nature. When at home I try to do some sports activities 3-4 times a week at least, and – recently – play with my now 8 month old son as much as I can.




Hjalmar GislasonHjálmar Gíslason, Founder and CEO: Hjalmar is a successful entrepreneur, founder of three startups in the gaming, mobile and web sectors since 1996. Prior to launching DataMarket, Hjalmar worked on new media and business development for companies in the Skipti Group (owners of Iceland Telecom) after their acquisition of his search startup – Spurl. Hjalmar offers a mix of business, strategy and technical expertise. DataMarket is based largely on his vision of the need for a global exchange for structured data.


To know more, have a quick  look at  http://datamarket.com/

Self Driving Cars , Geo Coded Ads, End of Privacy

Imagine a world in which your car tracks everywhere you go. Over a period of time, it builds up a database of your driving habits, how long you stay at particular kinds of dining places, entertainment places (ahem!) , and the days, and times you do it.  You can no longer go to massage parlours without your data being checked by your car software admin (read – your home admin)

And that data is mined using machine learning algols to give you better ads for pizzas, or a reminder for food after every 3 hours , or an ad for beer every Thursday after 8 pm .

Welcome Brave New World!

Note on Internet Privacy (Updated)and a note on DNSCrypt

I noticed the brouaha on Google’s privacy policy. I am afraid that social networks capture much more private information than search engines (even if they integrate my browser history, my social network, my emails, my search engine keywords) – I am still okay. All they are going to do is sell me better ads (maybe than just flood me with ads hoping to get a click). Of course Microsoft should take it one step forward and capture data from my desktop as well for better ads, that would really complete the curve. In any case , with the Patriot Act, most information is available to the Government anyway.

But it does make sense to have an easier to understand privacy policy, and one of my disappointments is the complete lack of visual appeal in such notices. Make things simple as possible, but no simpler, as Al-E said.


Privacy activists forget that ads run on models built on AGGREGATED data, and most models are scored automatically. Unless you do something really weird and fake like, chances are the data pertaining to you gets automatically collected, algorithmic-ally aggregated, then modeled and scored, and a corresponding ad to your score, or segment is shown to you. Probably no human eyes see raw data (but big G can clarify that)


( I also noticed Google gets a lot of free advice from bloggers. hey, if you were really good at giving advice to Google- they WILL hire you !)

on to another tool based (than legalese based approach to privacy)

I noticed tools like DNSCrypt increase internet security, so that all my integrated data goes straight to people I am okay with having it (ad sellers not governments!)

Unfortunately it is Mac Only, and I will wait for Windows or X based tools for a better review. I noticed some lag in updating these tools , so I can only guess that the boys of Baltimore have been there, so it is best used for home users alone.


Maybe they can find a chrome extension for DNS dummies.


Why DNSCrypt is so significant

In the same way the SSL turns HTTP web traffic into HTTPS encrypted Web traffic, DNSCrypt turns regular DNS traffic into encrypted DNS traffic that is secure from eavesdropping and man-in-the-middle attacks.  It doesn’t require any changes to domain names or how they work, it simply provides a method for securely encrypting communication between our customers and our DNS servers in our data centers.  We know that claims alone don’t work in the security world, however, so we’ve opened up the source to our DNSCrypt code base and it’s available onGitHub.

DNSCrypt has the potential to be the most impactful advancement in Internet security since SSL, significantly improving every single Internet user’s online security and privacy.



The DNSCurve project adds link-level public-key protection to DNS packets. This page discusses the cryptographic tools used in DNSCurve.

Elliptic-curve cryptography

DNSCurve uses elliptic-curve cryptography, not RSA.

RSA is somewhat older than elliptic-curve cryptography: RSA was introduced in 1977, while elliptic-curve cryptography was introduced in 1985. However, RSA has shown many more weaknesses than elliptic-curve cryptography. RSA’s effective security level was dramatically reduced by the linear sieve in the late 1970s, by the quadratic sieve and ECM in the 1980s, and by the number-field sieve in the 1990s. For comparison, a few attacks have been developed against some rare elliptic curves having special algebraic structures, and the amount of computer power available to attackers has predictably increased, but typical elliptic curves require just as much computer power to break today as they required twenty years ago.

IEEE P1363 standardized elliptic-curve cryptography in the late 1990s, including a stringent list of security criteria for elliptic curves. NIST used the IEEE P1363 criteria to select fifteen specific elliptic curves at five different security levels. In 2005, NSA issued a new “Suite B” standard, recommending the NIST elliptic curves (at two specific security levels) for all public-key cryptography and withdrawing previous recommendations of RSA.

Some specific types of elliptic-curve cryptography are patented, but DNSCurve does not use any of those types of elliptic-curve cryptography.


Secure Browsing from Mobile and PC ( Tor ,PeerNet, WasteAgain)

While Tor remains the tool of choice with pseudo-techie hacker wannabes , there is enough juice and smoke and mirrors on the market to confuse your average Joe.

For a secure browsing experience on Mobile – do NOT use either Apple or Windows OS

Use Android  and this app called Orbot in particular

Installing Tor with a QR code

Orbot is easy to install by simply scanning the following QR code with your Android Barcode scanner.

Android QR code

Installing Tor from the Android Market

Orbot is available in the Android Market.


If you have a Dell PC, well just use PeerNet to configure and set up your own network around the neighbourhood. This is particularly applicable if you are in country that is both repressive and not so technologically advanced. Wont work in China or USA.


What is a peer network?

A peer network is a network in which one computer can connect directly to another computer. This capability is accomplished by enabling access point (AP) functionality on one of the computers. Other computers can then connect to this computer in the same way that they would connect to a physical AP. If Internet Connection Sharing is enabled on the computer that has the AP functionality, computers that connect to that computer have Internet connectivity as well.

A basic peer network, which requires no networking knowledge or experience to set up, should meet the needs of most home users and small businesses. By default, a basic peer network is configured with the strongest available security (see How do I set up a basic peer network?).

For users who are familiar with wireless networking technology, advanced configuration features are available to do the following:

Change security settings (see How do I configure my peer network?)
Choose which method (push button or PIN) computers with Wi-Fi Protected Setup™ capability can join your peer network (see How do I allow peer devices to join my peer network using Wi-Fi Protected Setup technology?)
Change the DHCP Server IP address (see How do I configure my peer network?).
Change the channel on which to operate your peer network (see How do I configure my peer network?)

 If you are really really in a need for secure browsing (like you are maybe a big hot shot in the tech world), I suggest go over to VMWare


create a seperate Linux (Ubuntu for ease) virtual disc, then download the Tor Browser Bundle from

https://www.torproject.org/projects/torbrowser.html.en for surfing and a Peernet (above) or  a prepaid one time use disposable mobile pre-paid wireless card. It is also quite easy to delete your virtual disc in times of emergencies (but it is best to use encryption even when in Ubuntu https://help.ubuntu.com/community/EncryptedHome)

IRC chat is less secure than you think it is thanks to BOT  Trawlers- so I am hoping someone in the open source community updates Waste Again for encrypted chats http://wasteagain.sourceforge.net/

What is “WASTE again”?

“WASTE again” enables you to create a decentralized and secure private mesh network using an unsecure network, such as the internet. Once the public encryption keys are exchanged, sending messages, creating groupchats and transferring files is easy and secure.

Creating a mesh

To create a mesh you need at least two computers with “WASTE again” installed. During installation, a unique pair of public and private keys for each computer is being generated. Before the first connection can be established, you need to exchange these public keys. These keys enable “WASTE again” to authenticate every connection to other “WASTE again” clients.

After exchanging the keys, you simply type in the computers IP address to connect to. If that computer is located behind a firewall or a NAT-router, you have to create a portmap first to enable incoming connections.

At least one computer in your mesh has to be able to accept incoming connections, making it a “public node”. If no direct connection between two firewalled computers can be made, “WASTE again” automatically routes your traffic through one or more of the available public nodes.

Every new node simply has to exchange keys with one of the connected nodes and then connect to it. All the other nodes will exchange their keys automatically over the mesh.

Games on Google Plus get- Faster, Higher, Stronger

I am spending some time and some money on two games on Google Plus. One is Crime City at https://plus.google.com/games/865772480172 which I talk about in this post


and Global Warfare  https://plus.google.com/games/216622099218 (which is similar to Evony of the bad ads fame, and I will write on that in another post)

But the total number of games at Google Plus is increasingly and quietly getting better. It seems there is a distinct preference for existing blockbuster games , from both Zynga and non Zynga sources Even though Google is an investor in  Zynga, it clearly wants Google plus to avoid being so dependent on Zynga as Facebook clearly is. Continue reading “Games on Google Plus get- Faster, Higher, Stronger”