Analytics 2012 Conference

from http://www.sas.com/events/analytics/us/index.html

Analytics 2012 Conference

SAS and more than 1,000 analytics experts gather at

Caesars Palace
Caesars Palace

Analytics 2012 Conference Details

Pre-Conference Workshops – Oct 7
Conference – Oct 8-9
Post-Conference Training – Oct 10-12
Caesars Palace, Las Vegas

Keynote Speakers

The following are confirmed keynote speakers for Analytics 2012. Jim Goodnight Since he co-founded SAS in 1976, Jim Goodnight has served as the company’s Chief Executive Officer.

William Hakes Dr. William Hakes is the CEO and co-founder of Link Analytics, an analytical technology company focused on mobile, energy and government verticals.

Tim Rey Tim Rey  has written over 100 internal papers, published 21 external papers, and delivered numerous keynote presentations and technical talks at various quantitative methods forums. Recently he has co-chaired both forecasting and data mining conferences. He is currently in the process of co-writing a book, Applied Data Mining for Forecasting.

http://www.sas.com/events/analytics/us/train.html

Pre-Conference

Plan to come to Analytics 2012 a day early and participate in one of the pre-conference workshops or take a SAS Certification exam. Prices for all of the preconference workshops, except for SAS Sentiment Analysis Studio: Introduction to Building Models and the Business Analytics Consulting Workshops, are included in the conference package pricing. You will be prompted to select your pre-conference training options when you register.

Sunday Morning Workshop

SAS Sentiment Analysis Studio: Introduction to Building Models

This course provides an introduction to SAS Sentiment Analysis Studio. It is designed for system designers, developers, analytical consultants and managers who want to understand techniques and approaches for identifying sentiment in textual documents.
View outline
Sunday, Oct. 7, 8:30a.m.-12p.m. – $250

Sunday Afternoon Workshops

Business Analytics Consulting Workshops

This workshop is designed for the analyst, statistician, or executive who wants to discuss best-practice approaches to solving specific business problems, in the context of analytics. The two-hour workshop will be customized to discuss your specific analytical needs and will be designed as a one-on-one session for you, including up to five individuals within your company sharing your analytical goal. This workshop is specifically geared for an expert tasked with solving a critical business problem who needs consultation for developing the analytical approach required. The workshop can be customized to meet your needs, from a deep-dive into modeling methods to a strategic plan for analytic initiatives. In addition to the two hours at the conference location, this workshop includes some advanced consulting time over the phone, making it a valuable investment at a bargain price.
View outline
Sunday, Oct. 7; 1-3 p.m. or 3:30-5:30 p.m. – $200

Demand-Driven Forecasting: Sensing Demand Signals, Shaping and Predicting Demand

This half-day lecture teaches students how to integrate demand-driven forecasting into the consensus forecasting process and how to make the current demand forecasting process more demand-driven.
View outline
Sunday, Oct. 7; 1-5 p.m.

Forecast Value Added Analysis

Forecast Value Added (FVA) is the change in a forecasting performance metric (such as MAPE or bias) that can be attributed to a particular step or participant in the forecasting process. FVA analysis is used to identify those process activities that are failing to make the forecast any better (or might even be making it worse). This course provides step-by-step guidelines for conducting FVA analysis – to identify and eliminate the waste, inefficiency, and worst practices from your forecasting process. The result can be better forecasts, with fewer resources and less management time spent on forecasting.
View outline
Sunday, Oct. 7; 1-5 p.m.

SAS Enterprise Content Categorization: An Introduction

This course gives an introduction to methods of unstructured data analysis, document classification and document content identification. The course also uses examples as the basis for constructing parse expressions and resulting entities.
View outline
Sunday, Oct. 7; 1-5 p.m.

Introduction to Data Mining and SAS Enterprise Miner

This course serves as an introduction to data mining and SAS Enterprise Miner for Desktop software. It is designed for data analysts and qualitative experts as well as those with less of a technical background who want a general understanding of data mining.
View outline
Sunday, Oct. 7, 1-5 p.m.

Modeling Trend, Cycles, and Seasonality in Time Series Data Using PROC UCM

This half-day lecture teaches students how to model, interpret, and predict time series data using UCMs. The UCM procedure analyzes and forecasts equally spaced univariate time series data using the unobserved components models (UCM). This course is designed for business analysts who want to analyze time series data to uncover patterns such as trend, seasonal effects, and cycles using the latest techniques.
View outline
Sunday, Oct. 7, 1-5 p.m.

SAS Rapid Predictive Modeler

This seminar will provide a brief introduction to the use of SAS Enterprise Guide for graphical and data analysis. However, the focus will be on using SAS Enterprise Guide and SAS Enterprise Miner along with the Rapid Predictive Modeling component to build predictive models. Predictive modeling will be introduced using the SEMMA process developed with the introduction of SAS Enterprise Miner. Several examples will be used to illustrate the use of the Rapid Predictive Modeling component, and interpretations of the model results will be provided.
View outline
Sunday, Oct. 7, 1-5 p.m

Interview Ajay Ohri Decisionstats.com with DMR

From-

http://www.dataminingblog.com/data-mining-research-interview-ajay-ohri/

Here is the winner of the Data Mining Research People Award 2010: Ajay Ohri! Thanks to Ajay for giving some time to answer Data Mining Research questions. And all the best to his blog, Decision Stat!

Data Mining Research (DMR): Could you please introduce yourself to the readers of Data Mining Research?

Ajay Ohri (AO): I am a business consultant and writer based out of Delhi- India. I have been working in and around the field of business analytics since 2004, and have worked with some very good and big companies primarily in financial analytics and outsourced analytics. Since 2007, I have been writing my blog at http://decisionstats.com which now has almost 10,000 views monthly.

All in all, I wrote about data, and my hobby is also writing (poetry). Both my hobby and my profession stem from my education ( a masters in business, and a bachelors in mechanical engineering).

My research interests in data mining are interfaces (simpler interfaces to enable better data mining), education (making data mining less complex and accessible to more people and students), and time series and regression (specifically ARIMAX)
In business my research interests software marketing strategies (open source, Software as a service, advertising supported versus traditional licensing) and creation of technology and entrepreneurial hubs (like Palo Alto and Research Triangle, or Bangalore India).

DMR: I know you have worked with both SAS and R. Could you give your opinion about these two data mining tools?

AO: As per my understanding, SAS stands for SAS language, SAS Institute and SAS software platform. The terms are interchangeably used by people in industry and academia- but there have been some branding issues on this.
I have not worked much with SAS Enterprise Miner , probably because I could not afford it as business consultant, and organizations I worked with did not have a budget for Enterprise Miner.
I have worked alone and in teams with Base SAS, SAS Stat, SAS Access, and SAS ETS- and JMP. Also I worked with SAS BI but as a user to extract information.
You could say my use of SAS platform was mostly in predictive analytics and reporting, but I have a couple of projects under my belt for knowledge discovery and data mining, and pattern analysis. Again some of my SAS experience is a bit dated for almost 1 year ago.

I really like specific parts of SAS platform – as in the interface design of JMP (which is better than Enterprise Guide or Base SAS ) -and Proc Sort in Base SAS- I guess sequential processing of data makes SAS way faster- though with computing evolving from Desktops/Servers to even cheaper time shared cloud computers- I am not sure how long Base SAS and SAS Stat can hold this unique selling proposition.

I dislike the clutter in SAS Stat output, it confuses me with too much information, and I dislike shoddy graphics in the rendering output of graphical engine of SAS. Its shoddy coding work in SAS/Graph and if JMP can give better graphics why is legacy source code preventing SAS platform from doing a better job of it.

I sometimes think the best part of SAS is actually code written by Goodnight and Sall in 1970’s , the latest procs don’t impress me much.

SAS as a company is something I admire especially for its way of treating employees globally- but it is strange to see the rest of tech industry not following it. Also I don’t like over aggression and the SAS versus Rest of the Analytics /Data Mining World mentality that I sometimes pick up when I deal with industry thought leaders.

I think making SAS Enterprise Miner, JMP, and Base SAS in a completely new web interface priced at per hour rates is my wishlist but I guess I am a bit sentimental here- most data miners I know from early 2000’s did start with SAS as their first bread earning software. Also I think SAS needs to be better priced in Business Intelligence- it seems quite cheap in BI compared to Cognos/IBM but expensive in analytical licensing.

If you are a new stats or business student, chances are – you may know much more R than SAS today. The shift in education at least has been very rapid, and I guess R is also more of a platform than a analytics or data mining software.

I like a lot of things in R- from graphics, to better data mining packages, modular design of software, but above all I like the can do kick ass spirit of R community. Lots of young people collaborating with lots of young to old professors, and the energy is infectious. Everybody is a CEO in R ’s world. Latest data mining algols will probably start in R, published in journals.

Which is better for data mining SAS or R? It depends on your data and your deadline. The golden rule of management and business is -it depends.

Also I have worked with a lot of KXEN, SQL, SPSS.

DMR: Can you tell us more about Decision Stats? You have a traffic of 120′000 for 2010. How did you reach such a success?

AO: I don’t think 120,000 is a success. Its not a failure. It just happened- the more I wrote, the more people read.In 2007-2008 I used to obsess over traffic. I tried SEO, comments, back linking, and I did some black hat experimental stuff. Some of it worked- some didn’t.

In the end, I started asking questions and interviewing people. To my surprise, senior management is almost always more candid , frank and honest about their views while middle managers, public relations, marketing folks can be defensive.

Social Media helped a bit- Twitter, Linkedin, Facebook really helped my network of friends who I suppose acted as informal ambassadors to spread the word.
Again I was constrained by necessity than choices- my middle class finances ( I also had a baby son in 2007-my current laptop still has some broken keys :) – by my inability to afford traveling to conferences, and my location Delhi isn’t really a tech hub.

The more questions I asked around the internet, the more people responded, and I wrote it all down.

I guess I just was lucky to meet a lot of nice people on the internet who took time to mentor and educate me.

I tried building other websites but didn’t succeed so i guess I really don’t know. I am not a smart coder, not very clever at writing but I do try to be honest.

Basic economics says pricing is proportional to demand and inversely proportional to supply. Honest and candid opinions have infinite demand and an uncertain supply.

DMR: There is a rumor about a R book you plan to publish in 2011 :-) Can you confirm the rumor and tell us more?

AO: I just signed a contract with Springer for ” R for Business Analytics”. R is a great software, and lots of books for statistically trained people, but I felt like writing a book for the MBAs and existing analytics users- on how to easily transition to R for Analytics.

Like any language there are tricks and tweaks in R, and with a focus on code editors, IDE, GUI, web interfaces, R’s famous learning curve can be bent a bit.

Making analytics beautiful, and simpler to use is always a passion for me. With 3000 packages, R can be used for a lot more things and a lot more simply than is commonly understood.
The target audience however is business analysts- or people working in corporate environments.

Brief Bio-
Ajay Ohri has been working in the field of analytics since 2004 , when it was a still nascent emerging Industries in India. He has worked with the top two Indian outsourcers listed on NYSE,and with Citigroup on cross sell analytics where he helped sell an extra 50000 credit cards by cross sell analytics .He was one of the very first independent data mining consultants in India working on analytics products and domestic Indian market analytics .He regularly writes on analytics topics on his web site www.decisionstats.com and is currently working on open source analytical tools like R besides analytical software like SPSS and SAS.

So which software is the best analytical software? Sigh- It depends

 

Graph of typical Operating System placement on...
Image via Wikipedia

 

Here is the software matrix that I am trying to develop for analytical software- It should help as a tentative guide for software purchases- it’s independent so unbiased (hopefully)- and it will try and bring as much range or sensitivity as possible. The list (rather than matrix) is of the format-

Type 0f analysis-

  • Data Visualization (Reporting with Pivot Ability to aggregate, disaggregate)
  • Reporting without Pivot Ability
  • Regression -Logistic Regression for Propensity or Risk Models
  • Regression- Linear for Pricing Models
  • Hypothesis Testing
  • A/B Scenario Testing
  • Decision Trees (CART, CHAID)
  • Time Series Forecasting
  • Association Analysis
  • Factor Analysis
  • Survey (Questionnaires)
  • Clustering
  • Segmentation
  • Data Manipulation

Dataset Size-

  • small dataset (upto X mb)
  • big dataset (upto Y gb)
  • enterprise class production BigData datasets (no limit)

Pricing of Software that can be used-

Ease of using Software

  • GUI vs Non GUI
  • Software that require not much extensive training
  • Software that require extensive training

Installation, Customization, Maintainability (or Support) for Software

  • Installation Dependencies- Size- Hardware (costs and  efficiencies)
  • Customization provided for specific use
  • Support Channels (including approximate Turn Around Time)

Software

  • Software I have used personally
  • SAS (Base, Stat,Enterprise,Connect,ETS) WPS KXEN SPSS (Base,Trends),Revolution R,R,Rapid Miner,Knime,JMP,SQL SERVER,Rattle, R Commander,Deducer
  • Software I know by reputation- SAS Enterprise Miner etc etc

Are there any other parameters for judging software?  let me know at http://twitter.com/decisionstats

Interview Michael J. A. Berry Data Miners, Inc

Here is an interview with noted Data Mining practitioner Michael Berry, author of seminal books in data mining, noted trainer and consultantmjab picture

Ajay- Your famous book “Data Mining Techniques: For Marketing, Sales, and Customer Relationship Management” came out in 2004, and an update is being planned for 2011. What are the various new data mining techniques and their application that you intend to talk about in that book.

Michael- Each time we do a revision, it feels like writing a whole new book. The first edition came out in 1997 and it is hard to believe how much the world has changed since then. I’m currently spending most of my time in the on-line retailing world. The things I worry about today–improving recommendations for cross-sell and up-sell,and search engine optimization–wouldn’t have even made sense to me back then. And the data sizes that are routine today were beyond the capacity of the most powerful super computers of the nineties. But, if possible, Gordon and I have changed even more than the data mining landscape. What has changed us is experience. We learned an awful lot between the first and second editions, and I think we’ve learned even more between the second and third.

One consequence is that we now have to discipline ourselves to avoid making the book too heavy to lift. For the first edition, we could write everything we knew (and arguably, a bit more!); now we have to remind ourselves that our intended audience is still the same–intelligent laymen with a practical interest in getting more information out of data. Not statisticians. Not computer scientists. Not academic researchers. Although we welcome all readers, we are primarily writing for someone who works in a marketing department and has a title with the word “analyst” or “analytics” in it. We have relaxed our “no equations” rule slightly for cases when the equations really do make things easier to explain, but the core explanations are still in words and pictures.

The third edition completes a transition that was already happening in the second edition. We have fully embraced standard statistical modeling techniques as full-fledged components of the data miner’s toolkit. In the first edition, it seemed important to make a distinction between old, dull, statistics, and new, cool, data mining. By the second edition, we realized that didn’t really make sense, but remnants of that attitude persisted. The third edition rectifies this. There is a chapter on statistical modeling techniques that explains linear and logistic regression, naive Bayes models, and more. There is also a brand new chapter on text mining, a curious omission from previous editions.

There is also a lot more material on data preparation. Three whole chapters are devoted to various aspects of data preparation. The first focuses on creating customer signatures. The second is focused on using derived variables to bring information to the surface, and the third deals with data reduction techniques such as principal components. Since this is where we spend the greatest part of our time in our work, it seemed important to spend more time on these subjects in the book as well.

Some of the chapters have been beefed up a bit. The neural network chapter now includes radial basis functions in addition to multi-layer perceptrons. The clustering chapter has been split into two chapters to accommodate new material on soft clustering, self-organizing maps, and more. The survival analysis chapter is much improved and includes material on some of our recent application of survival analysis methods to forecasting. The genetic algorithms chapter now includes a discussion of swarm intelligence.

Ajay- Describe your early career and how you came into Data Mining as a profession. What do you think of various universities now offering MS in Analytics. How do you balance your own teaching experience with your consulting projects at The Data Miners.

Michael- I fell into data mining quite by accident. I guess I always had a latent interest in the topic. As a high school and college student, I was a fan of Martin Gardner‘s mathematical games in in Scientific American. One of my favorite things he wrote about was a game called New Eleusis in which one players, God, makes up a rule to govern how cards can be played (“an even card must be followed by a red card”, say) and the other players have to figure out the rule by watching what plays are allowed by God and which ones are rejected. Just for my own amusement, I wrote a computer program to play the game and presented it at the IJCAI conference in, I think, 1981.

That paper became a chapter in a book on computer game playing–so my first book was about finding patterns in data. Aside from that, my interest in finding patterns in data lay dormant for years. At Thinking Machines, I was in the compiler group. In particular, I was responsible for the run-time system of the first Fortran Compiler for the CM-2 and I represented Thinking Machines at the Fortran 8X (later Fortran-90) standards meetings.

What changed my direction was that Thinking Machines got an export license to sell our first machine overseas. The machine went to a research lab just outside of Paris. The connection machine was so hard to program, that if you bought one, you got an applications engineer to go along with it. None of the applications engineers wanted to go live in Paris for a few months, but I did.

Paris was a lot of fun, and so, I discovered, was actually working on applications. When I came back to the states, I stuck with that applied focus and my next assignment was to spend a couple of years at Epsilon, (then a subsidiary of American Express) working on a database marketing system that stored all the “records of charge” for American Express card members. The purpose of the system was to pick ads to go in the billing envelope. I also worked on some more general purpose data mining software for the CM-5.

When Thinking Machines folded, I had the opportunity to open a Cambridge office for a Virginia-based consulting company called MRJ that had been a major channel for placing Connection Machines in various government agencies. The new group at MRJ was focused on data mining applications in the commercial market. At least, that was the idea. It turned out that they were more interested in data warehousing projects, so after a while we parted company.

That led to the formation of Data Miners. My two partners in Data Miners, Gordon Linoff and Brij Masand, share the Thinking Machines background.

To tell the truth, I really don’t know much about the university programs in data mining that have started to crop up. I’ve visited the one at NC State, but not any of the others.

I myself teach a class in “Marketing Analytics” at the Carroll School of Management at Boston College. It is an elective part of the MBA program there. I also teach short classes for corporations on their sites and at various conferences.

Ajay- At the previous Predictive Analytics World, you took a session on Forecasting and Predicting Subsciber levels (http://www.predictiveanalyticsworld.com/dc/2009/agenda.php#day2-6) .

It seems inability to forecast is a problem many many companies face today. What do you think are the top 5 principles of business forecasting which companies need to follow.

Michael- I don’t think I can come up with five. Our approach to forecasting is essentially simulation. We try to model the underlying processes and then turn the crank to see what happens. If there is a principal behind that, I guess it is to approach a forecast from the bottom up rather than treating aggregate numbers as a time series.

Ajay- You often partner your talks with SAS Institute, and your blog at http://blog.data-miners.com/ sometimes contain SAS code as well. What particular features of the SAS software do you like. Do you use just the Enterprise Miner or other modules as well for Survival Analysis or Forecasting.

Michael- Our first data mining class used SGI’s Mineset for the hands-on examples. Later we developed versions using Clementine, Quadstone, and SAS Enterprise Miner. Then, market forces took hold. We don’t market our classes ourselves, we depend on others to market them and then share in the revenue.

SAS turned out to be much better at marketing our classes than the other companies, so over time we stopped updating the other versions. An odd thing about our relationship with SAS is that it is only with the education group. They let us use Enterprise Miner to develop course materials, but we are explicitly forbidden to use it in our consulting work. As a consequence, we don’t use it much outside of the classroom.

Ajay- Also any other software you use (apart from SQL and J)

Michael- We try to fit in with whatever environment our client has set up. That almost always is SQL-based (Teradata, Oracle, SQL Server, . . .). Often SAS Stat is also available and sometimes Enterprise Miner.

We run into SPSS, Statistica, Angoss, and other tools as well. We tend to work in big data environments so we’ve also had occasion to use Ab Initio and, more recently, Hadoop. I expect to be seeing more of that.

Biography-

Together with his colleague, Gordon Linoff, Michael Berry is author of some of the most widely read and respected books on data mining. These best sellers in the field have been translated into many languages. Michael is an active practitioner of data mining. His books reflect many years of practical, hands-on experience down in the data mines.

Data Mining Techniques cover

Data Mining Techniques for Marketing, Sales and Customer Relationship Management

by Michael J. A. Berry and Gordon S. Linoff
copyright 2004 by John Wiley & Sons
ISB

Mining the Web cover

Mining the Web

by Michael J.A. Berry and Gordon S. Linoff
copyright 2002 by John Wiley & Sons
ISBN 0-471-41609-6

Non-English editions available in Traditional Chinese and Simplified Chinese

This book looks at the new opportunities and challenges for data mining that have been created by the web. The book demonstrates how to apply data mining to specific types of online businesses, such as auction sites, B2B trading exchanges, click-and-mortar retailers, subscription sites, and online retailers of digital content.

Mastering Data Mining

by Michael J.A. Berry and Gordon S. Linoff
copyright 2000 by John Wiley & Sons
ISBN 0-471-33123-6

Non-English editions available in JapaneseItalianTraditional Chinese , and Simplified Chinese

A case study-based guide to applying data mining techniques for solving practical business problems. These “warts and all” case studies are drawn directly from consulting engagements performed by the authors.

A data mining educator as well as a consultant, Michael is in demand as a keynote speaker and seminar leader in the area of data mining generally and the application of data mining to customer relationship management in particular.

Prior to founding Data Miners in December, 1997, Michael spent 8 years at Thinking Machines Corporation. There he specialized in the application of massively parallel supercomputing techniques to business and marketing applications, including one of the largest database marketing systems of the time.

Why Cloud?

Here are some reasons why cloud computing is very helpful to small business owners like me- and can be very helpful to even bigger people.

1) Infrastructure Overhead becomes zero

– I need NOT invest in secure powerbackups (like a big battery for electricity power-outs-true in India), data disaster management (read raid), software licensing compliance.

All this is done for me by infrastructure providers like Google and Amazon.

For simple office productivity, I type on Google Docs that auto-saves my data,writing on cloud. I need not backup- Google does it for me.  Ditto for presentations and spreadsheets. Amazon gets me the latest Window software installed whenever I logon- I need not be  bothered by software contracts (read bug fixes and patches) any more.

2) Renting Hardware by the hour- A small business owner cannot invest too much in computing hardware (or software). The pay as you use makes sense for them. I could never afford a 8 cores desktop with 25 gb RAM- but I sure can rent and use it to bid for heavier data projects that I would have had to let go in the past.

3) Renting software by the hour- You may have bought your last PC for all time

An example- A windows micro instance costs you 3 cents per hour on Amazon. If you take a mathematical look at upgrading your PC to latest Windows, buying more and more upgraded desktops just to keep up, those costs would exceed 3 cents per hour. For Unix, it is 2 cents per hour, and those softwares (like Red Hat Linux and Ubuntu have increasingly been design friendly even for non techie users)

Some other software companies especially in enterprise software plan to and already offer paid machine images that basically adds their software layer on top of the OS and you can rent software for the hour.

It does not make sense for customers to effectively subsidize golf tournaments, rock concerts, conference networks by their own money- as they can rent software by the hour and switch to pay per use.

People especially SME consultants, academics and students and cost conscious customers – in Analytics would love to see a world where they could say run SAS Enterprise Miner for 10 dollars a hour for two hours to build a data mining model on 25 gb RAM, rather than hurt their pockets and profitability in Annual license models. Ditto for SPSS, JMP, KXEN, Revolution R, Oracle Data Mining (already available on Amazon) , SAP (??), WPS ( on cloud ???? ) . It’s the economy, stupid.

Corporates have realized that cutting down on Hardware and software expenses is more preferable to cutting down people. Would you rather fire people in your own team to buy that big HP or Dell or IBM Server (effectively subsidizing jobs in those companies). IF you had to choose between an annual license renewal for your analytics software TO renting software by the hour and using those savings for better benefits for your employees, what makes business sense for you to invest in.

Goodbye annual license fees.  Welcome brave new world.

The Top Statistical Softwares (GUI)

The list of top Statistical Softwares (GUI) is continued below. You can see the earlier post here

6. R Commander– While initially aimed at being a basic statistics GUI, the tremendous popularity of R Commander and the extensions in the form of plugins has helped make this one of the most widely used GUI. In short if you dont know ANY R, and still want to do basic descriptive stats and modeling this will come in handy- with an added script window for custom code for advanced users and extensions like that for DoE (design of experiments) and QCC (Quality Control) packages the e-plugins are a great way to extend this. I suspect the only thing holding it back is Dr Fox and the rest of R Core’s reluctance to fully embrace GUI as a software medium. You can read his earlier interview here-https://decisionstats.wordpress.com/2009/09/14/interview-professor-john-fox-creator-r-commander/

Technically it is possible to convert just about any package to a GUI menu in R Commander using the e-plugins.

7. SAS GUIs

Enterprise (Guide)

SAS Enterprise Guide was the higher end (and higher priced solution) to enhanced editor’s lack of menu driven commands. It works but many people I know prefer the text editor just as well.


The Enterprise Miner is a separate software and works more like Red R or SPSS Modeler does. Again EM is one of the major DM softwares out there, but the similarity in names is a bit confusing.

Even the Base SAS Enhanced Editor does have some menus for importing data, or querying etc, but it is rarely confused for being a GUI.

8. Oracle Data Miner and Knime

I like both the ODM and Knime but I find the lack of advertising or promotional support puzzling. Both these softwares can do well to combine technical excellence with some marketing. And since they are both free you can check them out yourself here

Oracle Data Mining

You can download it here-(note- the Oracle Web Site itself is a bit aging 🙂 )

http://www.oracle.com/technology/products/bi/odm/odminer.html

Knime is the open source GUI which can be found here-

http://www.knime.org/introduction/features

9. RAwkard

Another R GUI- it stands out on the comprehensive ways you can customize your code in menus rather than writing all or learning by rote the syntax.

From http://sourceforge.net/apps/mediawiki/rkward/index.php?title=Main_Page

you can see it below. I recommend this GUI over other GUIs especially if you are new to R and do more data visualization which needs custom graphics.

10. Red R and R JGR/ Deducer

Red R and RJGR/Deducer are both up and coming GUIs for R. While REd R is R version for Enterprise Miner, Deducer is coming up with a new GUI for ggplot the powerful graphics package in R.

Some GUIs excluded from this list are – Statistica, MatLab, EViews(?) because I dont really work with them, and thought it best to turn them over to someone who knows them better.

Hope this list of GUIs helps you- note most of the softwares can be learnt within a quick hour and two if you know basic software skills/data manipulation so going through the GUI list is a faster way of adding value to your resume/knowledge base as well.