PMML Augustus

Here is a new-old system in open source for

for building and scoring statistical models designed to work with data sets that are too large to fit into memory.

http://code.google.com/p/augustus/

Augustus is an open source software toolkit for building and scoring statistical models. It is written in Python and its
most distinctive features are:
• Ability to be used on sets of big data; these are data sets that exceed either memory capacity or disk capacity, so
that existing solutions like R or SAS cannot be used. Augustus is also perfectly capable of handling problems
that can fit on one computer.
• PMML compliance and the ability to both:
– produce models with PMML-compliant formats (saved with extension .pmml).
– consume models from files with the PMML format.
Augustus has been tested and deployed on serveral operating systems. It is intended for developers who work in the
financial or insurance industry, information technology, or in the science and research communities.
Usage
Augustus produces and consumes Baseline, Cluster, Tree, and Ruleset models. Currently, it uses an event-based
approach to building Tree, Cluster and Ruleset models that is non-standard.

New to PMML ?

Read on http://code.google.com/p/augustus/wiki/PMML

The Predictive Model Markup Language or PMML is a vendor driven XML markup language for specifying statistical and data mining models. In other words, it is an XML language so that Continue reading “PMML Augustus”

#Rstats for Business Intelligence

This is a short list of several known as well as lesser known R ( #rstats) language codes, packages and tricks to build a business intelligence application. It will be slightly Messy (and not Messi) but I hope to refine it someday when the cows come home.

It assumes that BI is basically-

a Database, a Document Database, a Report creation/Dashboard pulling software as well unique R packages for business intelligence.

What is business intelligence?

Seamless dissemination of data in the organization. In short let it flow- from raw transactional data to aggregate dashboards, to control and test experiments, to new and legacy data mining models- a business intelligence enabled organization allows information to flow easily AND capture insights and feedback for further action.

BI software has lately meant to be just reporting software- and Business Analytics has meant to be primarily predictive analytics. the terms are interchangeable in my opinion -as BI reports can also be called descriptive aggregated statistics or descriptive analytics, and predictive analytics is useless and incomplete unless you measure the effect in dashboards and summary reports.

Data Mining- is a bit more than predictive analytics- it includes pattern recognizability as well as black box machine learning algorithms. To further aggravate these divides, students mostly learn data mining in computer science, predictive analytics (if at all) in business departments and statistics, and no one teaches metrics , dashboards, reporting  in mainstream academia even though a large number of graduates will end up fiddling with spreadsheets or dashboards in real careers.

Using R with

1) Databases-

I created a short list of database connectivity with R here at https://rforanalytics.wordpress.com/odbc-databases-for-r/ but R has released 3 new versions since then.

The RODBC package remains the package of choice for connecting to SQL Databases.

http://cran.r-project.org/web/packages/RODBC/RODBC.pdf

Details on creating DSN and connecting to Databases are given at  https://rforanalytics.wordpress.com/odbc-databases-for-r/

For document databases like MongoDB and CouchDB

( what is the difference between traditional RDBMS and NoSQL if you ever need to explain it in a cocktail conversation http://dba.stackexchange.com/questions/5/what-are-the-differences-between-nosql-and-a-traditional-rdbms

Basically dispensing with the relational setup, with primary and foreign keys, and with the additional overhead involved in keeping transactional safety, often gives you extreme increases in performance

NoSQL is a kind of database that doesn’t have a fixed schema like a traditional RDBMS does. With the NoSQL databases the schema is defined by the developer at run time. They don’t write normal SQL statements against the database, but instead use an API to get the data that they need.

instead relating data in one table to another you store things as key value pairs and there is no database schema, it is handled instead in code.)

I believe any corporation with data driven decision making would need to both have atleast one RDBMS and one NoSQL for unstructured data-Ajay. This is a sweeping generic statement 😉 , and is an opinion on future technologies.

  • Use RMongo

From- http://tommy.chheng.com/2010/11/03/rmongo-accessing-mongodb-in-r/

http://plindenbaum.blogspot.com/2010/09/connecting-to-mongodb-database-from-r.html

Connecting to a MongoDB database from R using Java

http://nsaunders.wordpress.com/2010/09/24/connecting-to-a-mongodb-database-from-r-using-java/

Also see a nice basic analysis using R Mongo from

http://pseudofish.com/blog/2011/05/25/analysis-of-data-with-mongodb-and-r/

For CouchDB

please see https://github.com/wactbprot/R4CouchDB and

http://digitheadslabnotebook.blogspot.com/2010/10/couchdb-and-r.html

  • First install RCurl and RJSONIO. You’ll have to download the tar.gz’s if you’re on a Mac. For the second part, we’ll need to installR4CouchDB,

2) External Report Creating Software-

Jaspersoft- It has good integration with R and is a certified Revolution Analytics partner (who seem to be the only ones with a coherent #Rstats go to market strategy- which begs the question – why is the freest and finest stats software having only ONE vendor- if it was so great lots of companies would make exclusive products for it – (and some do -see https://rforanalytics.wordpress.com/r-business-solutions/ and https://rforanalytics.wordpress.com/using-r-from-other-software/)

From

http://www.jaspersoft.com/sites/default/files/downloads/events/Analytics%20-Jaspersoft-SEP2010.pdf

we see

http://jasperforge.org/projects/rrevodeployrbyrevolutionanalytics

RevoConnectR for JasperReports Server

RevoConnectR for JasperReports Server RevoConnectR for JasperReports Server is a Java library interface between JasperReports Server and Revolution R Enterprise’s RevoDeployR, a standardized collection of web services that integrates security, APIs, scripts and libraries for R into a single server. JasperReports Server dashboards can retrieve R charts and result sets from RevoDeployR.

http://jasperforge.org/plugins/esp_frs/optional_download.php?group_id=409

 

Using R and Pentaho
Extending Pentaho with R analytics”R” is a popular open source statistical and analytical language that academics and commercial organizations alike have used for years to get maximum insight out of information using advanced analytic techniques. In this twelve-minute video, David Reinke from Pentaho Certified Partner OpenBI provides an overview of R, as well as a demonstration of integration between R and Pentaho.
and from
R and BI – Integrating R with Open Source Business
Intelligence Platforms Pentaho and Jaspersoft
David Reinke, Steve Miller
Keywords: business intelligence
Increasingly, R is becoming the tool of choice for statistical analysis, optimization, machine learning and
visualization in the business world. This trend will only escalate as more R analysts transition to business
from academia. But whereas in academia R is often the central tool for analytics, in business R must coexist
with and enhance mainstream business intelligence (BI) technologies. A modern BI portfolio already includes
relational databeses, data integration (extract, transform, load – ETL), query and reporting, online analytical
processing (OLAP), dashboards, and advanced visualization. The opportunity to extend traditional BI with
R analytics revolves on the introduction of advanced statistical modeling and visualizations native to R. The
challenge is to seamlessly integrate R capabilities within the existing BI space. This presentation will explain
and demo an initial approach to integrating R with two comprehensive open source BI (OSBI) platforms –
Pentaho and Jaspersoft. Our efforts will be successful if we stimulate additional progress, transparency and
innovation by combining the R and BI worlds.
The demonstration will show how we integrated the OSBI platforms with R through use of RServe and
its Java API. The BI platforms provide an end user web application which include application security,
data provisioning and BI functionality. Our integration will demonstrate a process by which BI components
can be created that prompt the user for parameters, acquire data from a relational database and pass into
RServer, invoke R commands for processing, and display the resulting R generated statistics and/or graphs
within the BI platform. Discussion will include concepts related to creating a reusable java class library of
commonly used processes to speed additional development.

If you know Java- try http://ramanareddyg.blog.com/2010/07/03/integrating-r-and-pentaho-data-integration/

 

and I like this list by two venerable powerhouses of the BI Open Source Movement

http://www.openbi.com/demosarticles.html

Open Source BI as disruptive technology

http://www.openbi.biz/articles/osbi_disruption_openbi.pdf

Open Source Punditry

TITLE AUTHOR COMMENTS
Commercial Open Source BI Redux Dave Reinke & Steve Miller An review and update on the predictions made in our 2007 article focused on the current state of the commercial open source BI market. Also included is a brief analysis of potential options for commercial open source business models and our take on their applicability.
Open Source BI as Disruptive Technology Dave Reinke & Steve Miller Reprint of May 2007 DM Review article explaining how and why Commercial Open Source BI (COSBI) will disrupt the traditional proprietary market.

Spotlight on R

TITLE AUTHOR COMMENTS
R You Ready for Open Source Statistics? Steve Miller R has become the “lingua franca” for academic statistical analysis and modeling, and is now rapidly gaining exposure in the commercial world. Steve examines the R technology and community and its relevancy to mainstream BI.
R and BI (Part 1): Data Analysis with R Steve Miller An introduction to R and its myriad statistical graphing techniques.
R and BI (Part 2): A Statistical Look at Detail Data Steve Miller The usage of R’s graphical building blocks – dotplots, stripplots and xyplots – to create dashboards which require little ink yet tell a big story.
R and BI (Part 3): The Grooming of Box and Whiskers Steve Miller Boxplots and variants (e.g. Violin Plot) are explored as an essential graphical technique to summarize data distributions by categories and dimensions of other attributes.
R and BI (Part 4): Embellishing Graphs Steve Miller Lattices and logarithmic data transformations are used to illuminate data density and distribution and find patterns otherwise missed using classic charting techniques.
R and BI (Part 5): Predictive Modelling Steve Miller An introduction to basic predictive modelling terminology and techniques with graphical examples created using R.
R and BI (Part 6) :
Re-expressing Data
Steve Miller How do you deal with highly skewed data distributions? Standard charting techniques on this “deviant” data often fail to illuminate relationships. This article explains techniques to re-express skewed data so that it is more understandable.
The Stock Market, 2007 Steve Miller R-based dashboards are presented to demonstrate the return performance of various asset classes during 2007.
Bootstrapping for Portfolio Returns: The Practice of Statistical Analysis Steve Miller Steve uses the R open source stats package and Monte Carlo simulations to examine alternative investment portfolio returns…a good example of applied statistics using R.
Statistical Graphs for Portfolio Returns Steve Miller Steve uses the R open source stats package to analyze market returns by asset class with some very provocative embedded trellis charts.
Frank Harrell, Iowa State and useR!2007 Steve Miller In August, Steve attended the 2007 Internation R User conference (useR!2007). This article details his experiences, including his meeting with long-time R community expert, Frank Harrell.
An Open Source Statistical “Dashboard” for Investment Performance Steve Miller The newly launched Dashboard Insight web site is focused on the most useful of BI tools: dashboards. With this article discussing the use of R and trellis graphics, OpenBI brings the realm of open source to this forum.
Unsexy Graphics for Business Intelligence Steve Miller Utilizing Tufte’s philosophy of maximizing the data to ink ratio of graphics, Steve demonstrates the value in dot plot diagramming. The R open source statistical/analytics software is showcased.
I think that the report generation package Brew would also qualify as a BI package, but large scale implementation remains to be seen in
a commercial business environment
  • brew: Creating Repetitive Reports
 brew: Templating Framework for Report Generation

brew implements a templating framework for mixing text and R code for report generation. brew template syntax is similar to PHP, Ruby's erb module, Java Server Pages, and Python's psp module. http://bit.ly/jINmaI
  • Yarr- creating reports in R
to be continued ( when I have more time and the temperature goes down from 110F in Delhi, India)

Augustus- a PMML model producer and consumer. Scoring engine.

A Bold GNU Head
Image via Wikipedia

I just checked out this new software for making PMML models. It is called Augustus and is created by the Open Data Group (http://opendatagroup.com/) , which is headed by Robert Grossman, who was the first proponent of using R on Amazon Ec2.

Probably someone like Zementis ( http://adapasupport.zementis.com/ ) can use this to further test , enhance or benchmark on the Ec2. They did have a joint webinar with Revolution Analytics recently.

https://code.google.com/p/augustus/

Recent News

  • Augustus v 0.4.3.1 has been released
  • Added a guide (pdf) for including Augustus in the Windows System Properties.
  • Updated the install documentation.
  • Augustus 2010.II (Summer) release is available. This is v 0.4.2.0. More information is here.
  • Added performance discussion concerning the optional cyclic garbage collection.

See Recent News for more details and all recent news.

Augustus

Augustus is a PMML 4-compliant scoring engine that works with segmented models. Augustus is designed for use with statistical and data mining models. The new release provides Baseline, Tree and Naive-Bayes producers and consumers.

There is also a version for use with PMML 3 models. It is able to produce and consume models with 10,000s of segments and conforms to a PMML draft RFC for segmented models and ensembles of models. It supports Baseline, Regression, Tree and Naive-Bayes.

Augustus is written in Python and is freely available under the GNU General Public License, version 2.

See the page Which version is right for me for more details regarding the different versions.

PMML

Predictive Model Markup Language (PMML) is an XML mark up language to describe statistical and data mining models. PMML describes the inputs to data mining models, the transformations used to prepare data for data mining, and the parameters which define the models themselves. It is used for a wide variety of applications, including applications in finance, e-business, direct marketing, manufacturing, and defense. PMML is often used so that systems which create statistical and data mining models (“PMML Producers”) can easily inter-operate with systems which deploy PMML models for scoring or other operational purposes (“PMML Consumers”).

Change Detection using Augustus

For information regarding using Augustus with Change Detection and Health and Status Monitoring, please see change-detection.

Open Data

Open Data Group provides management consulting services, outsourced analytical services, analytic staffing, and expert witnesses broadly related to data and analytics. It has experience with customer data, supplier data, financial and trading data, and data from internal business processes.

It has staff in Chicago and San Francisco and clients throughout the U.S. Open Data Group began operations in 2002.


Overview

The above example contains plots generated in R of scoring results from Augustus. Each point on the graph represents a use of the scoring engine and a chart is an aggregation of multiple Augustus runs. A Baseline (Change Detection) model was used to score data with multiple segments.

Typical Use

Augustus is typically used to construct models and score data with models. Augustus includes a dedicated application for creating, or producing, predictive models rendered as PMML-compliant files. Scoring is accomplished by consuming PMML-compliant files describing an appropriate model. Augustus provides a dedicated application for scoring data with four classes of models, Baseline (Change Detection) ModelsTree ModelsRegression Models and Naive Bayes Models. The typical model development and use cycle with Augustus is as follows:

  1. Identify suitable data with which to construct a new model.
  2. Provide a model schema which proscribes the requirements for the model.
  3. Run the Augustus producer to obtain a new model.
  4. Run the Augustus consumer on new data to effect scoring.

Separate consumer and producer applications are supplied for Baseline (Change Detection) models, Tree models, Regression models and for Naive Bayes models. The producer and consumer applications require configuration with XML-formatted files. The specification of the configuration files and model schema are detailed below. The consumers provide for some configurability of the output but users will often provide additional post-processing to render the output according to their needs. A variety of mechanisms exist for transmitting data but user’s may need to provide their own preprocessing to accommodate their particular data source.

In addition to the producer and consumer applications, Augustus is conceptually structured and provided with libraries which are relevant to the development and use of Predictive Models. Broadly speaking, these consist of components that address the use of PMML and components that are specific to Augustus.

Post Processing

Augustus can accommodate a post-processing step. While not necessary, it is often useful to

  • Re-normalize the scoring results or performing an additional transformation.
  • Supplements the results with global meta-data such as timestamps.
  • Formatting of the results.
  • Select certain interesting values from the results.
  • Restructure the data for use with other applications.

Interesting R competition at Reddit

Image representing Reddit as depicted in Crunc...
Image via CrunchBase

Here is an interesting R competition going on at Reddit and it is to help Reddit make a recommendation engine 🙂

http://www.reddit.com/r/redditdev/comments/dtg4j/want_to_help_reddit_build_a_recommender_a_public/

by ketralnis

As promised, here is the big dump of voting information that you guys donated to research. Warning: this contains much geekery that may result in discomfort for the nerd-challenged.

I’m trying to use it to build a recommender, and I’ve got some preliminary source code. I’m looking for feedback on all of these steps, since I’m not experienced at machine learning.

Here’s what I’ve done

  • I dumped all of the raw data that we’ll need to generate the public dumps. The queries are the comments in the two .pig files and it took about 52 minutes to do the dump against production. The result of this raw dump looks like:
    $ wc -l *.dump
     13,830,070 reddit_data_link.dump
    136,650,300 reddit_linkvote.dump
         69,489 reddit_research_ids.dump
     13,831,374 reddit_thing_link.dump
    
  • I filtered the list of votes for the list of users that gave us permission to use their data. For the curious, that’s 67,059 users: 62,763 with “public votes” and 6,726 with “allow my data to be used for research”. I’d really like to see that second category significantly increased, and hopefully this project will be what does it. This filtering is done by srrecs_researchers.pig and took 83m55.335s on my laptop.
  • I converted data-dumps that were in our DB schema format to a more useable format using srrecs.pig(about 13min)
  • From that dump I mapped all of the account_ids, link_ids, and sr_ids to salted hashes (using obscure() insrrecs.py with a random seed, so even I don’t know it). This took about 13min on my laptop. The result of this, votes.dump is the file that is actually public. It is a tab-separated file consisting in:
    account_id,link_id,sr_id,dir
    

    There are 23,091,688 votes from 43,976 users over 3,436,063 links in 11,675 reddits. (Interestingly these ~44k users represent almost 17% of our total votes). The dump is 2.2gb uncompressed, 375mb in bz2.

What to do with it

The recommendations system that I’m trying right now turns those votes into a set of affinities. That is, “67% of user #223’s votes on /r/reddit.com are upvotes and 52% on programming). To make these affinities (55m45.107s on my laptop):

 cat votes.dump | ./srrecs.py "affinities_m()" | sort -S200m | ./srrecs.py "affinities_r()" > affinities.dump

Then I turn the affinities into a sparse matrix representing N-dimensional co-ordinates in the vector space of affinities (scaled to -1..1 instead of 0..1), in the format used by R’s skmeans package (less than a minute on my laptop). Imagine that this matrix looks like

          reddit.com pics       programming horseporn  bacon
          ---------- ---------- ----------- ---------  -----
ketralnis -0.5       (no votes) +0.45       (no votes) +1.0
jedberg   (no votes) -0.25      +0.95       +1.0       -1.0
raldi     +0.75      +0.75      +0.7        (no votes) +1.0
...

We build it like:

# they were already grouped by account_id, so we don't have to
# sort. changes to the previous step will probably require this
# step to have to sort the affinities first
cat affinities.dump | ./srrecs.py "write_matrix('affinities.cm', 'affinities.clabel', 'affinities.rlabel')"

I pass that through an R program srrecs.r (if you don’t have R installed, you’ll need to install that, and the packageskmeans like install.packages('skmeans')). This program plots the users in this vector space finding clusters using a sperical kmeans clustering algorithm (on my laptop, takes about 10 minutes with 15 clusters and 16 minutes with 50 clusters, during which R sits at about 220mb of RAM)

# looks for the files created by write_matrix in the current directory
R -f ./srrecs.r

The output of the program is a generated list of cluster-IDs, corresponding in order to the order of user-IDs inaffinities.clabel. The numbers themselves are meaningless, but people in the same cluster ID have been clustered together.

Here are the files

These are torrents of bzip2-compressed files. If you can’t use the torrents for some reason it’s pretty trivial to figure out from the URL how to get to the files directly on S3, but please try the torrents first since it saves us a few bucks. It’s S3 seeding the torrents anyway, so it’s unlikely that direct-downloading is going to go any faster or be any easier.

  • votes.dump.bz2 — A tab-separated list of:
    account_id, link_id, sr_id, direction
    
  • For your convenience, a tab-separated list of votes already reduced to percent-affinities affinities.dump.bz2, formatted:
    account_id, sr_id, affinity (scaled 0..1)
    
  • For your convenience, affinities-matrix.tar.bz2 contains the R CLUTO format matrix files affinities.cm,affinities.clabelaffinities.rlabel

And the code

  • srrecs.pigsrrecs_researchers.pig — what I used to generate and format the dumps (you probably won’t need this)
  • mr_tools.pysrrecs.py — what I used to salt/hash the user information and generate the R CLUTO-format matrix files (you probably won’t need this unless you want different information in the matrix)
  • srrecs.r — the R-code to generate the clusters

Here’s what you can experiment with

  • The code isn’t nearly useable yet. We need to turn the generated clusters into an actual set of recommendations per cluster, preferably ordered by predicted match. We probably need to do some additional post-processing per user, too. (If they gave us an affinity of 0% to /r/askreddit, we shouldn’t recommend it, even if we predicted that the rest of their cluster would like it.)
  • We need a test suite to gauge the accuracy of the results of different approaches. This could be done by dividing the data-set in and using 80% for training and 20% to see if the predictions made by that 80% match.
  • We need to get the whole process to less than two hours, because that’s how often I want to run the recommender. It’s okay to use two or three machines to accomplish that and a lot of the steps can be done in parallel. That said we might just have to accept running it less often. It needs to run end-to-end with no user-intervention, failing gracefully on error
  • It would be handy to be able to idenfity the cluster of just a single user on-the-fly after generating the clusters in bulk
  • The results need to be hooked into the reddit UI. If you’re willing to dive into the codebase, this one will be important as soon as the rest of the process is working and has a lot of room for creativity
  • We need to find the sweet spot for the number of clusters to use. Put another way, how many different types of redditors do you think there are? This could best be done using the aforementioned test-suite and a good-old-fashioned binary search.

Some notes:

  • I’m not attached to doing this in R (I don’t even know much R, it just has a handy prebaked skmeans implementation). In fact I’m not attached to my methods here at all, I just want a good end-result.
  • This is my weekend fun project, so it’s likely to move very slowly if we don’t pick up enough participation here
  • The final version will run against the whole dataset, not just the public one. So even though I can’t release the whole dataset for privacy reasons, I can run your code and a test-suite against it

——————————————————————————————-

 

I am thinking of using Rattle and using the arules package, and running it on the EC2 to get the horsepower.

How else do you think you can tackle a recommendation engine problem.

 

Ajay

 

Using Red R- R with a Visual Interface

For people complaining about the GUI on R, here is the ah Enterprise Version of R called Red R.

It is available at the website at http://www.red-r.org/

 

You can read more there or just go through the short video created by them at

Basically it is a click and point method of using R with the ability to store schemas and thus very good for repeatable operations as well.


Not bad for epic software, huh?