Happy $100 Billion to Mark Zuckerberg Productions !

Heres to an expected $100 billion market valuation to the latest Silicon Valley Legend, Facebook- A Mark Zuckerberg Production.

Some milestones that made FB what it is-

1) Beating up MySpace, Ibibo, Google Orkut combined

2) Smart timely acquisitions from Friend feed , to Instagram

3) Superb infrastructure for 900 million accounts, fast interface rollouts, and a policy of never deleting data. Some of this involved creating new technology like Cassandra. There have been no anti-trust complaints against FB’s behavior particularly as it simply stuck to being the cleanest interface offering a social network

4) Much envied and copied features like Newsfeed, App development on the FB platform, Social Gaming as revenue streams

5) Replacing Google as the hot techie employer, just like Google did to Microsoft.

6) An uncanny focus, including walking away from a billion dollars from Yahoo,resisting Google, Apple’s Ping, imposing design changes unilaterally, implementing data sharing only with flexible partners  and strategic investors (like Bing)

FB has made more money for more people than any other company in the past ten years. Here’s wishing it an even more interesting next ten years! With 900 million users if they could integrate a PayPal like system, or create an alternative to Adsense for content creators, they could create an all new internet economy – one which is more open than the Google dominated internet ; 0

 

Facebook Search- The fall of the machines

Increasingly I am beginning to search more and more on Facebook. This is for the following reasons-

1) Facebook is walled off to Google (mostly). While within Facebook , I get both people results and content results (from Bing).

Bing is an okay alternative , though not as fast as Google Instant.

2) Cleaner Web Results When Facebook increases the number of results from 3 top links to say 10 top links, there should be more outbound traffic from FB search to websites.For some reason Google continues to show 14 pages of results… Why? Why not limit to just one page.

3) Better People Search than  Pipl and Google. But not much (or any) image search. This is curious and I am hoping the Instagram results would be added to search results.

4) I am hoping for any company Facebook or Microsoft to challenge Adsense . Adwords already has rivals. Adsense is a de facto monopoly and my experiences in advertising show that content creators can make much more money from a better Adsense (especially ) if Adsense and Adwords do not have a conflict of interest from same advertisers.

Adwords should have been a special case of Adsense for Google.com but it is not.

5) Machine learning can only get you from tau to delta tau. When ad click behavior is inherently dependent on humans who behave mostly on chaotic , or genetic models than linear CPC models. I find FB has an inherent advantage in the quantity and quality of data collected on people behavior rather than click behavior. They are also more aggressive and less apologetic about behavorially targeted  ads.

Additional point- Analytics for Google Analytics is not as rich as analytics from Facebook pages in terms of demographic variables. This can be tested by anyone.

 

Google introduces Google Play

Some nice new features from the big G men from Mountain view. Google Play- for movies, games, apps, music and books. Nice to see entertainment is back on Google’s priority.

 

See this to read more

https://play.google.com/about/

When will I get Google Play?

About Google Play

Q: What is Google Play?
A: Google Play is a new digital content experience from Google where you can find your favorite music, movies, books, and Android apps and games. It’s your entertainment hub: you can access it from the web or from your Android device or even TV, and all your content is instantly available across all of these devices.

Q: What is your strategy with Google Play?
A: Our goal with Google Play is to bring together all your favorite content in one place that you can access across your devices. Specifically, digital content is fundamental to the mobile experience, so bringing all of this content together in one place for users makes the Android platform even more compelling. We’re also simplifying digital content for Google users – you can go to the Google Play website on your desktop and purchase and experience the latest movies, music and books. With Google Play, we’re giving you a simpler way to get your digital content.

Q: What will the experience be for users? What will happen to my existing account?
A: All content and apps in your existing account will remain in your account, but will transition to Google Play. On your device, the Android Market app icon will become the Google Play store icon. You’ll see “Play Store.” For the movies, books and music apps, you’ll begin to see Play versions of these as well, such as “Play Music,” and “Play Movies.”

Q: When will I get Google Play? What markets is this available in?
A: We’ll be rolling out Google Play globally starting today. On the web, Google Play will be live today. On devices, it will take a few days for the Android Market app to update to the Google Play Store app. The music, books and movies apps will also receive an update today.
Around the globe, Google Play will include Android apps and games. In countries where we have already launched music, books or movies, you will see those categories available in Google Play, too.

Q: I live outside the US. When will I get the books, music or movies verticals? I only see Android apps and games?
A: We want to bring different content categories to as many countries as possible. We’ve already launched movies and books in several countries outside the U.S. and will continue to do so overtime, but we don’t have a specific timeline to share.

Q: What types of content are available in my country?

  • Paid Apps: Available in these countries
  • Movies: Available in US, UK, Canada, and Japan
  • eBooks: Available in US, UK, Canada, and Australia
  • Music: Available in US

 

Q: Does this mean Google Music and the Google eBookstore will cease to exist? What about my account?
A: Both Google Music and the Google eBookstore are now part of Google Play. Your music and your books, including anything you bought, are still there, available to you in Google Play and accessible through your Google account.

Q: Where did my Google eBooks books go? Will I still have access to them?
A: Your books are now part of Google Play. Your books are still there, available to you in your Google Play library and accessible through your Google account.

Q: I don’t use an Android phone, can I still use Google Play?
A: Yes. Google Play is available on any computer with a modern browser at play.google.com. On the web, you can browse and buy books, movies and music. You can read books on the Google Play web reader, listen to music on your computer or watch movies online. Your digital content is all stored in the cloud, so you can access from anywhere using your Google Account.
We’ve also created ways to experience your music and books on other platforms such as the Google Books iOS app.

Q: Why do I not see Google Play yet on my device?
A: Please see our help center article on this here.

Q: How can I contact Google Play consumer support?
A: You can call or email our team here.

Book Review- Machine Learning for Hackers

This is review of the fashionably named book Machine Learning for Hackers by Drew Conway and John Myles White (O’Reilly ). The book is about hacking code in R.

 

The preface introduces the reader to the authors conception of what machine learning and hacking is all about. If the name of the book was machine learning for business analytsts or data miners, I am sure the content would have been unchanged though the popularity (and ambiguity) of the word hacker can often substitute for its usefulness. Indeed the many wise and learned Professors of statistics departments through out the civilized world would be mildly surprised and bemused by their day to day activities as hacking or teaching hackers. The book follows a case study and example based approach and uses the GGPLOT2 package within R programming almost to the point of ignoring any other native graphics system based in R. It can be quite useful for the aspiring reader who wishes to understand and join the booming market for skilled talent in statistical computing.

Chapter 1 has a very useful set of functions for data cleansing and formatting. It walks you through the basics of formatting based on dates and conditions, missing value and outlier treatment and using ggplot package in R for graphical analysis. The case study used is an Infochimps dataset with 60,000 recordings of UFO sightings. The case study is lucid, and done at a extremely helpful pace illustrating the powerful and flexible nature of R functions that can be used for data cleansing.The chapter mentions text editors and IDEs but fails to list them in a tabular format, while listing several other tables like Packages used in the book. It also jumps straight from installation instructions to functions in R without getting into the various kinds of data types within R or specifying where these can be referenced from. It thus assumes a higher level of basic programming understanding for the reader than the average R book.

Chapter 2 discusses data exploration, and has a very clear set of diagrams that explain the various data summary operations that are performed routinely. This is an innovative approach and will help students or newcomers to the field of data analysis. It introduces the reader to type determination functions, as well different kinds of encoding. The introduction to creating functions is quite elegant and simple , and numerical summary methods are explained adequately. While the chapter explains data exploration with the help of various histogram options in ggplot2 , it fails to create a more generic framework for data exploration or rules to assist the reader in visual data exploration in non standard data situations. While the examples are very helpful for a reader , there needs to be slightly more depth to step out of the example and into a framework for visual data exploration (or references for the same). A couple of case studies however elaborately explained cannot do justice to the vast field of data exploration and especially visual data exploration.

Chapter 3 discussed binary classification for the specific purpose for spam filtering using a dataset from SpamAssassin. It introduces the reader to the naïve Bayes classifier and the principles of text mining suing the tm package in R. Some of the example codes could have been better commented for easier readability in the book. Overall it is quite a easy tutorial for creating a naïve Bayes classifier even for beginners.

Chapter 4 discusses the issues in importance ranking and creating recommendation systems specifically in the case of ordering email messages into important and not important. It introduces the useful grepl, gsub, strsplit, strptime ,difftime and strtrim functions for parsing data. The chapter further introduces the reader to the concept of log (and affine) transformations in a lucid and clear way that can help even beginners learn this powerful transformation concept. Again the coding within this chapter is sparsely commented which can cause difficulties to people not used to learn reams of code. ( it may have been part of the code attached with the book, but I am reading an electronic book and I did not find an easy way to go back and forth between the code and the book). The readability of the chapters would be further enhanced by the use of flow charts explaining the path and process followed than overtly verbose textual descriptions running into multiple pages. The chapters are quite clearly written, but a helpful visual summary can help in both revising the concepts and elucidate the approach taken further.A suggestion for the authors could be to compile the list of useful functions they introduce in this book as a sort of reference card (or Ref Card) for R Hackers or atleast have a chapter wise summary of functions, datasets and packages used.

Chapter 5 discusses linear regression , and it is a surprising and not very good explanation of regression theory in the introduction to regression. However the chapter makes up in practical example what it oversimplifies in theory. The chapter on regression is not the finest chapter written in this otherwise excellent book. Part of this is because of relative lack of organization- correlation is explained after linear regression is explained. Once again the lack of a function summary and a process flow diagram hinders readability and a separate section on regression metrics that help make a regression result good or not so good could be a welcome addition. Functions introduced include lm.

Chapter 6 showcases Generalized Additive Model (GAM) and Polynomial Regression, including an introduction to singularity and of over-fitting. Functions included in this chapter are transform, and poly while the package glmnet is also used here. The chapter also introduces the reader formally to the concept of cross validation (though examples of cross validation had been introduced in earlier chapters) and regularization. Logistic regression is also introduced at the end in this chapter.

Chapter 7 is about optimization. It describes error metric in a very easy to understand way. It creates a grid by using nested loops for various values of intercept and slope of a regression equation and computing the sum of square of errors. It then describes the optim function in detail including how it works and it’s various parameters. It introduces the curve function. The chapter then describes ridge regression including definition and hyperparameter lamda. The use of optim function to optimize the error in regression is useful learning for the aspiring hacker. Lastly it describes a case study of breaking codes using the simplistic Caesar cipher, a lexical database and the Metropolis method. Functions introduced in this chapter include .Machine$double.eps .

Chapter 8 deals with Principal Component Analysis and unsupervised learning. It uses the ymd function from lubridate package to convert string to date objects, and the cast function from reshape package to further manipulate the structure of data. Using the princomp functions enables PCA in R.The case study creates a stock market index and compares the results with the Dow Jones index.

Chapter 9 deals with Multidimensional Scaling as well as clustering US senators on the basis of similarity in voting records on legislation .It showcases matrix multiplication using %*% and also the dist function to compute distance matrix.

Chapter 10 has the subject of K Nearest Neighbors for recommendation systems. Packages used include class ,reshape and and functions used include cor, function and log. It also demonstrates creating a custom kNN function for calculating Euclidean distance between center of centroids and data. The case study used is the R package recommendation contest on Kaggle. Overall a simplistic introduction to creating a recommendation system using K nearest neighbors, without getting into any of the prepackaged packages within R that deal with association analysis , clustering or recommendation systems.

Chapter 11 introduces the reader to social network analysis (and elements of graph theory) using the example of Erdos Number as an interesting example of social networks of mathematicians. The example of Social Graph API by Google for hacking are quite new and intriguing (though a bit obsolete by changes, and should be rectified in either the errata or next edition) . However there exists packages within R that should be atleast referenced or used within this chapter (like TwitteR package that use the Twitter API and ROauth package for other social networks). Packages used within this chapter include Rcurl, RJSONIO, and igraph packages of R and functions used include rbind and ifelse. It also introduces the reader to the advanced software Gephi. The last example is to build a recommendation engine for whom to follow in Twitter using R.

Chapter 12 is about model comparison and introduces the concept of Support Vector Machines. It uses the package e1071 and shows the svm function. It also introduces the concept of tuning hyper parameters within default algorithms . A small problem in understanding the concepts is the misalignment of diagram pages with the relevant code. It lastly concludes with using mean square error as a method for comparing models built with different algorithms.

 

Overall the book is a welcome addition in the library of books based on R programming language, and the refreshing nature of the flow of material and the practicality of it’s case studies make this a recommended addition to both academic and corporate business analysts trying to derive insights by hacking lots of heterogeneous data.

Have a look for yourself at-
http://shop.oreilly.com/product/0636920018483.do

Using Google Analytics with R

Some code to read in data from Google Analytics data. Some modifications include adding the SSL authentication code and modifying (in bold) the table.id parameter to choose correct website from a GA profile with many websites

The Google Analytics Package files can be downloaded from http://code.google.com/p/r-google-analytics/downloads/list

It provides access to Google Analytics data natively from the R Statistical Computing programming language. You can use this library to retrieve an R data.frame with Google Analytics data. Then perform advanced statistical analysis, like time series analysis and regressions.

Supported Features

  • Access to v2 of the Google Analytics Data Export API Data Feed
  • A QueryBuilder class to simplify creating API queries
  • API response is converted directly into R as a data.frame
  • Library returns the aggregates, and confidence intervals of the metrics, dynamically if they exist
  • Auto-pagination to return more than 10,000 rows of information by combining multiple data requests. (Upper Limit 1M rows)
  • Authorization through the ClientLogin routine
  • Access to all the profiles ids for the authorized user
  • Full documentation and unit tests
Code-

> library(XML)

>

> library(RCurl)

Loading required package: bitops

>

> #Change path name in the following to the folder you downloaded the Google Analytics Package

>

> source(“C:/Users/KUs/Desktop/CANADA/R/RGoogleAnalytics/R/RGoogleAnalytics.R”)

>

> source(“C:/Users/KUs/Desktop/CANADA/R/RGoogleAnalytics/R/QueryBuilder.R”)

> # download the file needed for authentication

> download.file(url=”http://curl.haxx.se/ca/cacert.pem”, destfile=”cacert.pem”)

trying URL ‘http://curl.haxx.se/ca/cacert.pem’ Content type ‘text/plain’ length 215993 bytes (210 Kb) opened

URL downloaded 210 Kb

>

> # set the curl options

> curl <- getCurlHandle()

> options(RCurlOptions = list(capath = system.file(“CurlSSL”, “cacert.pem”,

+ package = “RCurl”),

+ ssl.verifypeer = FALSE))

> curlSetOpt(.opts = list(proxy = ‘proxyserver:port’), curl = curl)

An object of class “CURLHandle” Slot “ref”: <pointer: 0000000006AA2B70>

>

> # 1. Create a new Google Analytics API object

>

> ga <- RGoogleAnalytics()

>

> # 2. Authorize the object with your Google Analytics Account Credentials

>

> ga$SetCredentials(“USERNAME”, “PASSWORD”)

>

> # 3. Get the list of different profiles, to help build the query

>

> profiles <- ga$GetProfileData()

>

> profiles #Error Check to See if we get the right website

$profile AccountName ProfileName TableId

1 dudeofdata.com dudeofdata.com ga:44926237

2 knol.google.com knol.google.com ga:45564890

3 decisionstats.com decisionstats.com ga:46751946

$total.results

total.results

1 3

>

> # 4. Build the Data Export API query

>

> #Modify the start.date and end.date parameters based on data requirements

>

> #Modify the table.id at table.id = paste(profiles$profile[X,3]) to get the X th website in your profile

> # 4. Build the Data Export API query

> query <- QueryBuilder() > query$Init(start.date = “2012-01-09”, + end.date = “2012-03-20”, + dimensions = “ga:date”,

+ metrics = “ga:visitors”,

+ sort = “ga:date”,

+ table.id = paste(profiles$profile[3,3]))

>

>

> #5. Make a request to get the data from the API

>

> ga.data <- ga$GetReportData(query)

[1] “Executing query: https://www.google.com/analytics/feeds/data?start-date=2012%2D01%2D09&end-date=2012%2D03%2D20&dimensions=ga%3Adate&metrics=ga%3Avisitors&sort=ga%3Adate&ids=ga%3A46751946&#8221;

>

> #6. Look at the returned data

>

> str(ga.data)

List of 3

$ data :’data.frame’: 72 obs. of 2 variables: ..

$ ga:date : chr [1:72] “20120109” “20120110” “20120111” “20120112” … ..

$ ga:visitors: num [1:72] 394 405 381 390 323 47 169 67 94 89 …

$ aggr.totals :’data.frame’: 1 obs. of 1 variable: ..

$ aggregate.totals: num 28348

$ total.results: num 72

>

> head(ga.data$data)

ga:date ga:visitors

1 20120109 394

2 20120110 405

3 20120111 381

4 20120112 390

5 20120113 323

6 20120114 47 >

> #Plotting the Traffic >

> plot(ga.data$data[,2],type=”l”)

Update- Some errors come from pasting Latex directly to WordPress. Here is some code , made pretty-r in case you want to play with the GA api

library(XML)

library(RCurl)

#Change path name in the following to the folder you downloaded the Google Analytics Package 

source("C:/Users/KUs/Desktop/CANADA/R/RGoogleAnalytics/R/RGoogleAnalytics.R")

source("C:/Users/KUs/Desktop/CANADA/R/RGoogleAnalytics/R/QueryBuilder.R")
# download the file needed for authentication
download.file(url="http://curl.haxx.se/ca/cacert.pem", destfile="cacert.pem")

# set the curl options
curl <- getCurlHandle()
options(RCurlOptions = list(capath = system.file("CurlSSL", "cacert.pem",
package = "RCurl"),
ssl.verifypeer = FALSE))
curlSetOpt(.opts = list(proxy = 'proxyserver:port'), curl = curl)

# 1. Create a new Google Analytics API object 

ga <- RGoogleAnalytics()

# 2. Authorize the object with your Google Analytics Account Credentials 

ga$SetCredentials("ohri2007@gmail.com", "XXXXXXX")

# 3. Get the list of different profiles, to help build the query

profiles <- ga$GetProfileData()

profiles #Error Check to See if we get the right website

# 4. Build the Data Export API query 

#Modify the start.date and end.date parameters based on data requirements 

#Modify the table.id at table.id = paste(profiles$profile[X,3]) to get the X th website in your profile 
# 4. Build the Data Export API query
query <- QueryBuilder()
query$Init(start.date = "2012-01-09",
                   end.date = "2012-03-20",
                   dimensions = "ga:date",
                   metrics = "ga:visitors",
                   sort = "ga:date",
                   table.id = paste(profiles$profile[3,3]))

#5. Make a request to get the data from the API 

ga.data <- ga$GetReportData(query)

#6. Look at the returned data 

str(ga.data)

head(ga.data$data)

#Plotting the Traffic 

plot(ga.data$data[,2],type="l")

Created by Pretty R at inside-R.org

Text Mining Barack Obama using R #rstats

  • We copy and paste President Barack Obama’s “Yes We Can” speech in a text document and read it in. For a word cloud we need a dataframe with two columns, one with words and the the other with frequency.We read in the transcript from http://www.nytimes.com/2008/01/08/us/politics/08text-obama.html?pagewanted=all&_r=0  and paste in the file located in the local directory- /home/ajay/Desktop/new. Note tm is a powerful package and will read ALL the text documents within the particular folder

library(tm)

library(wordcloud)

txt2=”/home/ajay/Desktop/new”

b=Corpus(DirSource(txt2), readerControl = list(language = “eng”))

> b b b tdm m1 v1 d1 wordcloud(d1$word,d1$freq)

Now it seems we need to remove some of the very commonly occuring words like “the” and “and”. We are not using the standard stopwords in english (the tm package provides that see Chapter 13 Text Mining case studies), as the words “we” and “can” are also included .

> b tdm m1 v1 d1 wordcloud(d1$word,d1$freq)

But let’s see how the wordcloud changes if we remove all English Stopwords.

> b tdm m1 v1 d1 wordcloud(d1$word,d1$freq)

and you can draw your own conclusions from the content of this famous speech based on your political preferences.

Politicians can give interesting speeches but they may be full of simple sounding words…..

Citation-

1. Ingo Feinerer (2012). tm: Text Mining Package. R package version0.5-7.1.

Ingo Feinerer, Kurt Hornik, and David Meyer (2008). Text Mining
Infrastructure in R. Journal of Statistical Software 25/5. URL:
http://www.jstatsoft.org/v25/i05/

2. Ian Fellows (2012). wordcloud: Word Clouds. R package version 2.0.

http://CRAN.R-project.org/package=wordcloud

3. You can see more than 100 of Obama’s speeches at http://obamaspeeches.com/

Quote- numbers dont lie, people do.

.

Cloud Computing – can be evil

Cloud Computing can be evil because-

1) Most browsers are owned by for profit corporations . Corporations can be evil, sometimes

And corporations can go bankrupt. You can back up data locally, but try backing up a corporation.

2) The content on your web page can be changed using translator extensions . This has interesting ramifications as in George Orwell. You may not be even aware of subtle changes introduced in your browser in the way it renders the html or some words using keywords from a browser extension app.

Imagine a new form of language called Politically Correct Truthspeak, and that can be in English but using machine learning learn to substitute politically sensitive words with Govt sanctioned words.

3) Your DNS and IP settings can be redirected using extensions. This means if a Govt passes a law- you can be denied the websites using just the browser not even the ISP.

Thats an extreme scenario for a authoritative govt creating its own version of Mafiaafire Redirector.

So how to keep the cloud computer honest?Move some stuff to the desktop

How to keep desktop computing efficient?Use some more cloud computing

It is not an OR but an AND function in which some computing can be local, some shared and some in the cloud.

Si?

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