Chapman/Hall announces new series on R

Rice University, Houston, Texas, USA - Cohen H...
Image via Wikipedia
R Authors get more choice and variety now-
http://www.mail-archive.com/r-help@r-project.org/msg122965.html
We are pleased to announce the launch of a new series of books on R. 

Chapman & Hall/CRC: The R Series

Aims and Scope
This book series reflects the recent rapid growth in the development and 
application of R, the programming language and software environment for 
statistical computing and graphics. R is now widely used in academic research, 
education, and industry. It is constantly growing, with new versions of the 
core software released regularly and more than 2,600 packages available. It is 
difficult for the documentation to keep pace with the expansion of the 
software, and this vital book series provides a forum for the publication of 
books covering many aspects of the development and application of R.

The scope of the series is wide, covering three main threads:
• Applications of R to specific disciplines such as biology, epidemiology, 
genetics, engineering, finance, and the social sciences.
• Using R for the study of topics of statistical methodology, such as linear 
and mixed modeling, time series, Bayesian methods, and missing data.
• The development of R, including programming, building packages, and graphics.

The books will appeal to programmers and developers of R software, as well as 
applied statisticians and data analysts in many fields. The books will feature 
detailed worked examples and R code fully integrated into the text, ensuring 
their usefulness to researchers, practitioners and students.

Series Editors
John M. Chambers (Department of Statistics, Stanford University, USA; 
j...@stat.stanford.edu)
Torsten Hothorn (Institut für Statistik, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität, 
München, Germany; torsten.hoth...@stat.uni-muenchen.de)
Duncan Temple Lang (Department of Statistics, University of California, Davis, 
USA; dun...@wald.ucdavis.edu)
Hadley Wickham (Department of Statistics, Rice University, Houston, Texas, USA; 
had...@rice.edu)

Call for Proposals
We are interested in books covering all aspects of the development and 
application of R software. If you have an idea for a book, please contact one 
of the series editors above or one of the Chapman & Hall/CRC statistics 
acquisitions editors below. Please provide brief details of topic, audience, 
aims and scope, and include an outline if possible.

We look forward to hearing from you.

Best regards,Rob Calver (rob.cal...@informa.com)
David Grubbs (david.gru...@taylorandfrancis.com)
John Kimmel (john.kim...@taylorandfrancis.com)

 

Google – Turns the Page

Duderstadt Center "The Dude", which ...
Image via Wikipedia

Meet Google’s new CEO

Larry Page
Co-Founder and President, Products

Larry Page was Google’s founding CEO and grew the company to more than 200 employees and profitability before moving into his role as president of products in April 2001. He continues to share responsibility for Google’s day-to-day operations with Eric Schmidt and Sergey Brin.

The son of Michigan State University computer science professor Dr. Carl Victor Page, Larry’s love of computers began at age six. While following in his father’s footsteps in academics, he became an honors graduate from the University of Michigan, where he earned a bachelor’s degree in engineering, with a concentration on computer engineering. During his time in Ann Arbor, Larry built an inkjet printer out of Lego™ bricks.

While in the Ph.D. program in computer science at Stanford University, Larry met Sergey Brin, and together they developed and ran Google, which began operating in 1998. Larry went on leave from Stanford after earning his master’s degree.

In 2002, Larry was named a World Economic Forum Global Leader for Tomorrow. He is a member of the National Advisory Committee (NAC) of the University of Michigan College of Engineering, and together with co-founder Sergey Brin, Larry was honored with the Marconi Prize in 2004. He is a trustee on the board of the X PRIZE, and was elected to the National Academy of Engineering in 2004.

and no coincidence but it reminded me of the Metallica video- Turn the Page. Forgive the Pun, herr Eric

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dOibtqWo6z4

Windows Azure and Amazon Free offer

Simple Cpu Cache Memory Organization
Image via Wikipedia

For Hi-Computing folks try out Azure for free-

http://www.microsoft.com/windowsazure/offers/popup/popup.aspx?lang=en&locale=en-US&offer=MS-AZR-0001P#compute

Windows Azure Platform
Introductory Special

This promotional offer enables you to try a limited amount of the Windows Azure platform at no charge. The subscription includes a base level of monthly compute hours, storage, data transfers, a SQL Azure database, Access Control transactions and Service Bus connections at no charge. Please note that any usage over this introductory base level will be charged at standard rates.

Included each month at no charge:

  • Windows Azure
    • 25 hours of a small compute instance
    • 500 MB of storage
    • 10,000 storage transactions
  • SQL Azure
    • 1GB Web Edition database (available for first 3 months only)
  • Windows Azure platform AppFabric
    • 100,000 Access Control transactions
    • 2 Service Bus connections
  • Data Transfers (per region)
    • 500 MB in
    • 500 MB out

Any monthly usage in excess of the above amounts will be charged at the standard rates. This introductory special will end on March 31, 2011 and all usage will then be charged at the standard rates.

Standard Rates:

Windows Azure

  • Compute*
    • Extra small instance**: $0.05 per hour
    • Small instance (default): $0.12 per hour
    • Medium instance: $0.24 per hour
    • Large instance: $0.48 per hour
    • Extra large instance: $0.96 per hour

 

http://aws.amazon.com/ec2/pricing/

Free Tier*

As part of AWS’s Free Usage Tier, new AWS customers can get started with Amazon EC2 for free. Upon sign-up, new AWScustomers receive the following EC2 services each month for one year:

  • 750 hours of EC2 running Linux/Unix Micro instance usage
  • 750 hours of Elastic Load Balancing plus 15 GB data processing
  • 10 GB of Amazon Elastic Block Storage (EBS) plus 1 million IOs, 1 GB snapshot storage, 10,000 snapshot Get Requests and 1,000 snapshot Put Requests
  • 15 GB of bandwidth in and 15 GB of bandwidth out aggregated across all AWS services

 

Paid Instances-

 

Standard On-Demand Instances Linux/UNIX Usage Windows Usage
Small (Default) $0.085 per hour $0.12 per hour
Large $0.34 per hour $0.48 per hour
Extra Large $0.68 per hour $0.96 per hour
Micro On-Demand Instances
Micro $0.02 per hour $0.03 per hour
High-Memory On-Demand Instances
Extra Large $0.50 per hour $0.62 per hour
Double Extra Large $1.00 per hour $1.24 per hour
Quadruple Extra Large $2.00 per hour $2.48 per hour
High-CPU On-Demand Instances
Medium $0.17 per hour $0.29 per hour
Extra Large $0.68 per hour $1.16 per hour
Cluster Compute Instances
Quadruple Extra Large $1.60 per hour N/A*
Cluster GPU Instances
Quadruple Extra Large $2.10 per hour N/A*
* Windows is not currently available for Cluster Compute or Cluster GPU Instances.

 

NOTE- Amazon Instance definitions differ slightly from Azure definitions

http://aws.amazon.com/ec2/instance-types/

Available Instance Types

Standard Instances

Instances of this family are well suited for most applications.

Small Instance – default*

1.7 GB memory
1 EC2 Compute Unit (1 virtual core with 1 EC2 Compute Unit)
160 GB instance storage
32-bit platform
I/O Performance: Moderate
API name: m1.small

Large Instance

7.5 GB memory
4 EC2 Compute Units (2 virtual cores with 2 EC2 Compute Units each)
850 GB instance storage
64-bit platform
I/O Performance: High
API name: m1.large

Extra Large Instance

15 GB memory
8 EC2 Compute Units (4 virtual cores with 2 EC2 Compute Units each)
1,690 GB instance storage
64-bit platform
I/O Performance: High
API name: m1.xlarge

Micro Instances

Instances of this family provide a small amount of consistent CPU resources and allow you to burst CPU capacity when additional cycles are available. They are well suited for lower throughput applications and web sites that consume significant compute cycles periodically.

Micro Instance

613 MB memory
Up to 2 EC2 Compute Units (for short periodic bursts)
EBS storage only
32-bit or 64-bit platform
I/O Performance: Low
API name: t1.micro

High-Memory Instances

Instances of this family offer large memory sizes for high throughput applications, including database and memory caching applications.

High-Memory Extra Large Instance

17.1 GB of memory
6.5 EC2 Compute Units (2 virtual cores with 3.25 EC2 Compute Units each)
420 GB of instance storage
64-bit platform
I/O Performance: Moderate
API name: m2.xlarge

High-Memory Double Extra Large Instance

34.2 GB of memory
13 EC2 Compute Units (4 virtual cores with 3.25 EC2 Compute Units each)
850 GB of instance storage
64-bit platform
I/O Performance: High
API name: m2.2xlarge

High-Memory Quadruple Extra Large Instance

68.4 GB of memory
26 EC2 Compute Units (8 virtual cores with 3.25 EC2 Compute Units each)
1690 GB of instance storage
64-bit platform
I/O Performance: High
API name: m2.4xlarge

High-CPU Instances

Instances of this family have proportionally more CPU resources than memory (RAM) and are well suited for compute-intensive applications.

High-CPU Medium Instance

1.7 GB of memory
5 EC2 Compute Units (2 virtual cores with 2.5 EC2 Compute Units each)
350 GB of instance storage
32-bit platform
I/O Performance: Moderate
API name: c1.medium

High-CPU Extra Large Instance

7 GB of memory
20 EC2 Compute Units (8 virtual cores with 2.5 EC2 Compute Units each)
1690 GB of instance storage
64-bit platform
I/O Performance: High
API name: c1.xlarge

Cluster Compute Instances

Instances of this family provide proportionally high CPU resources with increased network performance and are well suited for High Performance Compute (HPC) applications and other demanding network-bound applications. Learn more about use of this instance type for HPC applications.

Cluster Compute Quadruple Extra Large Instance

23 GB of memory
33.5 EC2 Compute Units (2 x Intel Xeon X5570, quad-core “Nehalem” architecture)
1690 GB of instance storage
64-bit platform
I/O Performance: Very High (10 Gigabit Ethernet)
API name: cc1.4xlarge

Cluster GPU Instances

Instances of this family provide general-purpose graphics processing units (GPUs) with proportionally high CPU and increased network performance for applications benefitting from highly parallelized processing, including HPC, rendering and media processing applications. While Cluster Compute Instances provide the ability to create clusters of instances connected by a low latency, high throughput network, Cluster GPU Instances provide an additional option for applications that can benefit from the efficiency gains of the parallel computing power of GPUs over what can be achieved with traditional processors. Learn moreabout use of this instance type for HPC applications.

Cluster GPU Quadruple Extra Large Instance

22 GB of memory
33.5 EC2 Compute Units (2 x Intel Xeon X5570, quad-core “Nehalem” architecture)
2 x NVIDIA Tesla “Fermi” M2050 GPUs
1690 GB of instance storage
64-bit platform
I/O Performance: Very High (10 Gigabit Ethernet)
API name: cg1.4xlarge

versus-

Windows Azure compute instances come in five unique sizes to enable complex applications and workloads.

Compute Instance Size CPU Memory Instance Storage I/O Performance
Extra Small 1 GHz 768 MB 20 GB* Low
Small 1.6 GHz 1.75 GB 225 GB Moderate
Medium 2 x 1.6 GHz 3.5 GB 490 GB High
Large 4 x 1.6 GHz 7 GB 1,000 GB High
Extra large 8 x 1.6 GHz 14 GB 2,040 GB High

*There is a limitation on the Virtual Hard Drive (VHD) size if you are deploying a Virtual Machine role on an extra small instance. The VHD can only be up to 15 GB.

 

 

Handling time and date in R

John Harrison's famous chronometer
Image via Wikipedia

One of the most frustrating things I had to do while working as financial business analysts was working with Data Time Formats in Base SAS. The syntax was simple enough and SAS was quite good with handing queries to the Oracle data base that the client was using, but remembering the different types of formats in SAS language was a challenge (there was a date9. and date6 and mmddyy etc )

Data and Time variables are particularly important variables in financial industry as almost everything is derived variable from the time (which varies) while other inputs are mostly constants. This includes interest as well as late fees and finance fees.

In R, date and time are handled quite simply-

Use the strptime( dataset, format) function to convert the character into string

For example if the variable dob is “01/04/1977) then following will convert into a date object

z=strptime(dob,”%d/%m/%Y”)

and if the same date is 01Apr1977

z=strptime(dob,"%d%b%Y")

 

does the same

For troubleshooting help with date and time, remember to enclose the formats

%d,%b,%m and % Y in the same exact order as the original string- and if there are any delimiters like ” -” or “/” then these delimiters are entered in exactly the same order in the format statement of the strptime

Sys.time() gives you the current date-time while the function difftime(time1,time2) gives you the time intervals( say if you have two columns as date-time variables)

 

What are the various formats for inputs in date time?

%a
Abbreviated weekday name in the current locale. (Also matches full name on input.)
%A
Full weekday name in the current locale. (Also matches abbreviated name on input.)
%b
Abbreviated month name in the current locale. (Also matches full name on input.)
%B
Full month name in the current locale. (Also matches abbreviated name on input.)
%c
Date and time. Locale-specific on output, "%a %b %e %H:%M:%S %Y" on input.
%d
Day of the month as decimal number (01–31).
%H
Hours as decimal number (00–23).
%I
Hours as decimal number (01–12).
%j
Day of year as decimal number (001–366).
%m
Month as decimal number (01–12).
%M
Minute as decimal number (00–59).
%p
AM/PM indicator in the locale. Used in conjunction with %I and not with %H. An empty string in some locales.
%S
Second as decimal number (00–61), allowing for up to two leap-seconds (but POSIX-compliant implementations will ignore leap seconds).
%U
Week of the year as decimal number (00–53) using Sunday as the first day 1 of the week (and typically with the first Sunday of the year as day 1 of week 1). The US convention.
%w
Weekday as decimal number (0–6, Sunday is 0).
%W
Week of the year as decimal number (00–53) using Monday as the first day of week (and typically with the first Monday of the year as day 1 of week 1). The UK convention.
%x
Date. Locale-specific on output, "%y/%m/%d" on input.
%X
Time. Locale-specific on output, "%H:%M:%S" on input.
%y
Year without century (00–99). Values 00 to 68 are prefixed by 20 and 69 to 99 by 19 – that is the behaviour specified by the 2004 POSIX standard, but it does also say ‘it is expected that in a future version the default century inferred from a 2-digit year will change’.
%Y
Year with century.
%z
Signed offset in hours and minutes from UTC, so -0800 is 8 hours behind UTC.
%Z
(output only.) Time zone as a character string (empty if not available).

Also to read the helpful documentation (especially for time zone level, and leap year seconds and differences)
http://stat.ethz.ch/R-manual/R-patched/library/base/html/difftime.html
http://stat.ethz.ch/R-manual/R-patched/library/base/html/strptime.html
http://stat.ethz.ch/R-manual/R-patched/library/base/html/Ops.Date.html
http://stat.ethz.ch/R-manual/R-patched/library/base/html/Dates.html

 

PAW Blog Partnership

Please use the following code  to get a 15% discount on the 2 Day Conference Pass: AJAY11.

 

 

 

 

Predictive Analytics World announces new full-day workshops coming to San Francisco March 13-19, amounting to seven consecutive days of content.

These workshops deliver top-notch analytical and business expertise across the hottest topics.

Register now for one or more workshops, offered just before and after the full two-day Predictive Analytics World conference program (March 14-15). Early Bird registration ends on January 31st – take advantage of reduced pricing before then.

Driving Enterprise Decisions with Business Analytics – March 13, 2011
James Taylor, CEO, Decision Management Solutions
NEW – R for Predictive Modeling: A Hands-On Introduction – March 13, 2011
Max Kuhn, Director, Nonclinical Statistics, Pfizer
The Best and Worst of Predictive Analytics: Predictive Modeling Methods and Common Data Mining Mistakes – March 16, 2011
John Elder, Ph.D., CEO and Founder, Elder Research, Inc.
Hands-On Predictive Analytics – March 17, 2011
Dean Abbott, President, Abbott Analytics
NEW – Net Lift Models: Optimizing the Impact of Your Marketing – March 18-19, 2011
Kim Larsen, VP of Analytical Insights, Market Share Partners

Download the Conference Preview or view the Predictive Analytics World Agenda online

Make savings now with the early bird rate. Receive $200 off your registration rate for Predictive Analytics World – San Francisco (March 14-15), plus $100 off each workshop for which you register.

Register now before Early Bird Price expires on January 31st!

Additional savings of $200 on the two-day conference pass when you register a colleague at the same time.