Interview Anne Milley JMP

Here is an interview with Anne Milley,Sr Director, Analytic Strategy, JMP.

Ajay- Review – How was the year 2012 for Analytics in general and JMP in particular?
Anne- 2012 was great!  Growing interest in analytics is evident—more analytics books, blogs, LinkedIn groups, conferences, training, capability, integration….  JMP had another good year of worldwide double-digit growth.

Ajay-  Forecast- What is your forecast for analytics in terms of top 5 paradigms for 2013?
Anne- In an earlier blog, I had predicted we will continue to see more lively data and information visualizations—by that I mean more interactive and dynamic graphics for both data analysts and information consumers.
We will continue to hear about big data, data science and other trendy terms. As we amass more and more data histories, we can expect to see more innovations in time series visualization. I am excited by the growing interest we see in spatial and image analysis/visualization and hope those trends continue—especially more objective, data-driven image analysis in medicine! Perhaps not a forecast, but a strong desire, to see more people realize and benefit from the power of experimental design. We are pleased that more companies—most recently SiSoft—have integrated with JMP to make DOE a more seamless part of the design engineer’s workflow.

 Ajay- Cloud- Cloud Computing seems to be the next computing generation. What are JMP plans for cloud computing?
Anne- With so much memory and compute power on the desktop, there is still plenty of action on PCs. That said, JMP is Citrix-certified and we do see interest in remote desktop virtualization, but we don’t support public clouds.

Ajay- Events- What are your plans for the International Year of Statistics at JMP?
Anne- We kicked off our Analytically Speaking webcast series this year with John Sall in recognition of the first-ever International Year of Statistics. We have a series of blog posts on our International Year of Statistics site that features a noteworthy statistician each month, and in keeping with the goals of Statistics2013, we are happy to:

  • increase awareness of statistics and why it’s essential,
  • encourage people to consider it as a profession and/or enhance their skills with more statistical knowledge, and
  • promote innovation in the sciences of probability and statistics.

Both JMP and SAS are doing a variety of other things to help celebrate statistics all year long!

Ajay- Education Training-  How does JMP plan to leverage the MOOC paradigm (massive open online course) as offered by providers like Coursera etc.?
Anne- Thanks to you for posting this to the JMP Professional Network  on LinkedIn, where there is some great discussion on this topic.  The MOOC concept is wonderful—offering people the ability to invest in themselves, enhance their understanding on such a wide variety of topics, improve their communities….  Since more and more professors are teaching with JMP, it would be great to see courses on various areas of statistics (especially since this is the International Year of Statistics!) using JMP. JMP strives to remove complexity and drudgery from the analysis process so the analyst can stay in flow and focus on solving the problem at hand. For instance, the one-click bootstrap is a great example of something that should be promoted in an intro stats class. Imagine getting to appreciate the applied results and see the effects of sampling variability without having to know distribution theory. It’s good that people have options to enhance their skills—people can download a 30-day free trial of JMP and browse our learning library as well.

Ajay- Product- What are some of the exciting things JMP users and fans can look forward to in the next releases this year?
Anne- There are a number of enhancements and new capabilities planned for new releases of the JMP family of products, but you will have to wait to hear details…. OK, I’ll share a few!  JMP Clinical 4.1 will have more sophisticated fraud detection. We are also excited about releasing version 11 of JMP and JMP Pro this September.  JMP’s DOE capability is well-known, and we are pleased to offer a brand new class of experimental design—definitive screening designs. This innovation has already been recognized with The 2012 Statistics in Chemistry Award to Scott Allen of Novomer in collaboration with Bradley Jones in the JMP division of SAS. You will hear more about the new releases of JMP and JMP Pro at  Discovery Summit in San Antonio—we are excited to have Nate Silver as our headliner!

About-

Anne Milley directs analytic strategy in JMP Product Marketing at SAS.  Her ties to SAS began with bank failure prediction at FHLB Dallas.  Using SAS continued at 7-Eleven Corporation in Strategic Planning.  She has authored papers and served on committees for SAS Education conferences, KDD, and SIAM.  In 2008, she completed a 5-month assignment at a UK bank.  Milley completed her M.A. in Economics from Florida Atlantic University, did post-graduate work at RWTH Aachen, and is proficient in German.

JMP-

Introduced in 1989, JMP has grown into a family of statistical discovery products used worldwide in almost every industry. JMP is statistical discovery software  that links dynamic data visualization with robust statistics, in memory and on the desktop. From its beginnings, JMP software has empowered its users by enabling interactive analytics on the desktop. JMP products continue to complement – and are often deployed with – analytics solutions that provide server-based business intelligence.

 

Jump to JMP- the best statistical GUI software as per Google Search

This book just won an international award

producing graphs alongside results. In most cases, each page or two-page spread completes a JMP task, which maximizes the book’s utility as a reference.

Continue reading “Jump to JMP- the best statistical GUI software as per Google Search”

Interview Anne Milley JMP

Here is an interview with Anne Milley, a notable thought leader in the world of analytics. Anne is now Senior Director, Analytical Strategy in Product Marketing for JMP , the leading data visualization software from the SAS Institute.

Ajay-What do you think are the top 5 unique selling points of JMP compared to other statistical software in its category?

Anne-

JMP combines incredible analytic depth and breadth with interactive data visualization, creating a unique environment optimized for discovery and data-driven innovation.

With an extensible framework using JSL (JMP Scripting Language), and integration with SAS, R, and Excel, JMP becomes your analytic hub.

JMP is accessible to all kinds of users. A novice analyst can dig into an interactive report delivered by a custom JMP application. An engineer looking at his own data can use built-in JMP capabilities to discover patterns, and a developer can write code to extend JMP for herself or others.

State-of-the-art DOE capabilities make it easy for anyone to design and analyze efficient experiments to determine which adjustments will yield the greatest gains in quality or process improvement – before costly changes are made.

Not to mention, JMP products are exceptionally well designed and easy to use. See for yourself and check out the free trial at www.jmp.com.

Download a free 30-day trial of JMP.

Ajay- What are the challenges and opportunities of expanding JMP’s market share? Do you see JMP expanding its conferences globally to engage global audiences?

Anne-

We realized solid global growth in 2010. The release of JMP Pro and JMP Clinical last year along with continuing enhancements to the rest of the JMP family of products (JMP and JMP Genomics) should position us well for another good year.

With the growing interest in analytics as a means to sustained value creation, we have the opportunity to help people along their analytic journey – to get started, take the next step, or adopt new paradigms speeding their time to value. The challenge is doing that as fast as we would like.

We are hiring internationally to offer even more events, training and academic programs globally.

Ajay- What are the current and proposed educational and global academic initiatives of JMP? How can we see more JMP in universities across the world (say India- China etc)?

Anne-

We view colleges and universities both as critical incubators of future JMP users and as places where attitudes about data analysis and statistics are formed. We believe that a positive experience in learning statistics makes a person more likely to eventually want and need a product like JMP.

For most students – and particularly for those in applied disciplines of business, engineering and the sciences – the ability to make a statistics course relevant to their primary area of study fosters a positive experience. Fortunately, there is a trend in statistical education toward a more applied, data-driven approach, and JMP provides a very natural environment for both students and researchers.

Its user-friendly navigation, emphasis on data visualization and easy access to the analytics behind the graphics make JMP a compelling alternative to some of our more traditional competitors.

We’ve seen strong growth in the education markets in the last few years, and JMP is now used in nearly half of the top 200 universities in the US.

Internationally, we are at an earlier stage of market development, but we are currently working with both JMP and SAS country offices and their local academic programs to promote JMP. For example, we are working with members of the JMP China office and faculty at several universities in China to support the use of JMP in the development of a master’s curriculum in Applied Statistics there, touched on in this AMSTAT News article.

Ajay- What future trends do you see for 2011 in this market (say top 5)?

Anne-

Growing complexity of data (text, image, audio…) drives the need for more and better visualization and analysis capabilities to make sense of it all.

More “chief analytics officers” are making better use of analytic talent – people are the most important ingredient for success!

JMP has been on the vanguard of 64-bit development, and users are now catching up with us as 64-bit machines become more common.

Users should demand easy-to-use, exploratory and predictive modeling tools as well as robust tools to experiment and learn to help them make the best decisions on an ongoing basis.

All these factors and more fuel the need for the integration of flexible, extensible tools with popular analytic platforms.

Ajay-You enjoy organic gardening as a hobby. How do you think hobbies and unwind time help people be better professionals?

Anne-

I am lucky to work with so many people who view their work as a hobby. They have other interests too, though, some of which are work-related (statistics is relevant everywhere!). Organic gardening helps me put things in perspective and be present in the moment. More than work defines who you are. You can be passionate about your work as well as passionate about other things. I think it’s important to spend some leisure time in ways that bring you joy and contribute to your overall wellbeing and outlook.

Btw, nice interviews over the past several months—I hadn’t kept up, but will check it out more often!

Biography–  Source- http://www.sas.com/knowledge-exchange/business-analytics/biographies.html

  • Anne Milley

    Anne Milley

    Anne Milley is Senior Director of Analytics Strategy at JMP Product Marketing at SAS. Her ties to SAS began with bank failure prediction at Federal Home Loan Bank Dallas and continued at 7-Eleven Inc. She has authored papers and served on committees for F2006, KDD, SIAM, A2010 and several years of SAS’ annual data mining conference. Milley is a contributing faculty member for the International Institute of Analytics. anne.milley@jmp.com

Aster Data : Big Data Bigger Analytics Campaign

My favorite ( as of now) company in Big Data is Aster Data* ( I am partial to companies founded by Stanford Alumni having interacted with a lot of them while working with Trilogy- another Stanford dropout alumni company. There are also not too many Silicon Valley startups by us famously non intellectual Punjus

Q- What is the culture in Punjab A- In Punjab the only culture is agriculture)

Aster Data has correctly hit the marketing hammer on the nail of bigger data and with the quantities of data expanding rapidly  this is a lucrative market to get into ( as pointed by our favorite analytics journal NY Times)

Aster Data’s products of nCluster and nPath with MapReduce SQL, and the recent interactions with SAS Institute hold them in a nice promising place but with miles to go before they even rest ( or start thinking of that IPO)

Aster were present at Data Mining 2009 with terrific response to their booth.

As a techie wannabe stats frat boy, I like the Aster nPath product more (Time Series)  but the analytics within database claim with nCluster needs to be investigated and even tested further. Especially if you need  three days to get your monthly summary report.asterdata

( *and also an advertiser, sponsor to Big Data Summit as per FCC regulations)

The Data Services and Applications with flexibility for cloud computing is what makes this especially appealing from a product perspective while their relatively small size ( as compared to other bigger Vend- ORs) gives alliance partners more leverage in colloborating in Research and Design and maybe even co bundling applications.

Screenshots- Courtesy -The Lovely www.asterdata.com website ( Webmasters of other websites especially IBM and Oracle’s should take note how a website can have lots of content and yet be readable)

Also I will be posting the remaining Data Mining 2009 interviews shortly (including Part 2 with Anne) and share some/all of the presentations  via SlideShare embedding in WordPress.com ( post permission).

As for the Aster Data Interviews- I owe Peter Pavloski and the readers one. Coming up soon.

asterdata2

Audio Interview Anne Milley , Part 1

Here is an interview I did at M2009 with Anne Milley, senior SAS Strategist – This is an audio interview so listen on-

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or if bandwidth is too slow, you can download the interview here itself

https://decisionstats.files.wordpress.com/2009/11/memo1.m4a

 

 

 

 

 

Faye Meredith of SAS was kind enough to speak aloud the questions

This was a nice follow up on the March interview

<https://decisionstats.wordpress.com/2009/03/04/interview-anne-milley-sas-part-1/>.

Biography-

Anne H. Milley is senior director of SAS’ technology product marketing in worldwide marketing, Anne Milley oversees the marketing of SAS technologies.  Her ties to SAS began with her thesis on bank failure prediction models and the term structure of interest rates.  She completed this at The Federal Home Loan Bank of Dallas and became a manager in the credit group.  She continued her use of SAS at 7-Eleven, Inc. as a senior business consultant performing sales analysis and designing and conducting tests to aid in strategic decision-making, e.g., price sensitivity studies, advertising and promotion analysis.

Milley has authored various papers, articles and an award-winning report for the 1999 KDD Contest: http://www-cse.ucsd.edu/users/elkan/kdresults.html.  She co-chaired the SAS Data Mining Technology Conferences, M2001 and M2002 as well as SAS’ inaugural forecasting conference, F2006.  She has served on web mining committees for KDD and SIAM and on the Scientific Advisory Committee for Data Mining 2002.  In 2008 she completed a 5-month working sabbatical at a major financial services company in the United Kingdom.

Disclaimer- Travel and Stay Expenses to Data Mining 2009 were paid for me by SAS Institute. This is as per FCC regulations to bloggers. All opinions expressed are personal and not representing any organization.

SAS Data Mining 2009 Las Vegas

I am going to Las Vegas as a guest of SAS Institute for the Data Mining 2009 Conference. ( Note FCC regulations on bloggers come in effective December but my current policies are in ADVERTISE page unchanged since some months now)

With the big heavyweight of analytics, SAS Institute showcases events in both the SAS Global Forum and the Data Mining 2009

conference has a virtual who’s- who of partners there. This includes my friends at Aster Data and Shawn Rogers, Beye Network

in addition to Anne Milley, Senior Product Director. Anne is a frequent speaker for SAS Institute and has shrug off the beginning of the year NY Times spat with R /Open Source. True to their word they did go ahead and launch the SAS/IML with the interface to R – mindful of GPL as well as open source sentiments.

. While SPSS does have a data mining product there is considerable discussion on that help list today on what direction IBM will allow the data mining product to evolve.

Charlie Berger, from Oracle Data Mining , also announced at Oracle World that he is going to launch a GUI based data mining product for free ( or probably Software as a Service Model)- Thanks to Karl Rexer from Rexer Analytics for this tip.

While this is my first trip to Las Vegas ( a change from cold TN weather), I hope to read new stuff on data mining including sessions on blog and text mining and statistical usage of the same. Data Mining continues to be an enduring passion for me even though I need to get maybe a Divine Miracle for my Phd to get funded on that topic.

Also I may have some tweets at #M2009 for you and some video interviews/ photos. Ok- Watch this space.

ps _ We lost to Alabama #2 in the country by two points because 2 punts were blocked by hand which were as close as it gets.

Next week I hope to watch the South Carolina match in Orange Country.

Screenshot-32

Reactions to IBM -SPSS takeover.

The business intelligence -business analytics- data mining industry ( or as James Taylor would say Decision Management Industry) have some reactions on IBM – SPSS ( which was NOT a surprise to many including me). Really.

From SAS Institute, Anne Milley

http://blogs.sas.com/sascom/index.php?/archives/557-Analytics-is-still-our-middle-name.html

Besides SAS, SPSS was one of the last independent analytic software companies. A colleague says, “It’s the end of the analytics cold war.”

I’ve been saying all along that analytics is required for success. Yes, data integration, data quality, and query & reporting are important too but, as W. Edwards Deming says, “The object of taking data is to provide a basis for action.”

The end of the analytics cold war- hmm. We all know what the end of real cold war brought us- Google, Cloud Computing, and other non technical issues.

From KXEN, Roger Hadaad

“The price paid for SPSS of four times revenues and 25 times earnings shows just how valuable this sector really is,” says Haddad. “But the deal has also created a tremendous opportunity for the sector’s remaining independent vendors that

KXEN is well placed to capitalize on. “There is no For Sale sign hanging in our window,” continues Haddad. “We launched KXEN in 1998 to democratize the benefits of data mining and predictive analytics, making them practical and affordable across the whole enterprise and not just the exclusive preserve of a few specialists. It’s going to take up to two years for the dust to settle following the IBM

“Former SPSS partners, systems integrators and distributors will face uncertainty.”

I think the PE multiple was still low- SPSS was worth more if you count the client base, active community, brand itself in the valuation. Tremendous cross sell opportunities and IBM with it’s nice research and development is a good supporter of pure science.  Yes, next two years would be facing increasing consolidation and more “surprising” news. At 4 times earnings, anyone can be bought in the present market if it is a public listed company. 😉

From the rather subdued voices on SPSS list, some subjective and non quantitative ‘strategic” forecasts.

http://www.listserv.uga.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A2=ind0907&L=spssx-l&F=&S=&P=36324

I think the Ancient Chinese said it best “May you live in interesting times”.

Having worked with some flavors of Cognos and SPSS, I think there could be areas for technical integration for querying and GUI based forecasting as well, apart from financial mergers and administrative re adjustments. I mean people pull data not just to report it, but to estimate what comes next as well.

This could also spell the end of uni platform skilled analysts. You now need to learn atleast two different platforms like SAS,SPSS or KXEN, R or Cognos, Business Objects to hedge your chances of getting offshored (Note- I worked in offshoring for almost 4 years in India in data analytics).

Answering what IBM will do with SPSS and it’s open source commitment to R and consequences for employees, customers, vendors,partners who have more choices now than ever.

…. well it depends. Who is John Galt?