Cisco SocialMiner

A highly simplified version of the RSS feed ic...
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A new product from Cisco to mine social media for analytics on sentiment-

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/ps11349/index.html

Cisco SocialMiner is a social media customer care solution that can help you proactively respond to customers and prospects communicating through public social media networks like Twitter, Facebook, or other public forums or blogging sites. By providing social media monitoring, queuing, and workflow to organize customer posts on social media networks and deliver them to your social media customer care team, your company can respond to customers in real time using the same social network they are using.

Cisco SocialMiner provides:

  • The ability to configure multiple campaigns to search for customer postings on the public social web about your company’s products, services, or area of expertise
  • Filtering of social contacts based on preconfigured campaign filters to focus campaign searches
  • Routing of social contacts to skilled customer care representatives in the contact center or to experts in the enterprise–multiple people can work together to handle responses to customer postings through shared work queues
  • Detailed metrics for social media customer care activities, campaign reports, and team reports

With Cisco SocialMiner, your company can listen and respond to customer conversations originating in the social web. Being proactive can help your company enhance its service, improve customer loyalty, garner new customers, and protect your brand.

Table 1. Features and Benefits of Cisco SocialMiner 8.5

Feature Benefits
Product Baseline Features
Social media feeds

• Feeds are configurable sources to capture public social contacts that contain specific words, terms, or phrases.

• Feeds enable you to search for information on the public social web about your company’s products, services, or area of expertise.

• Cisco SocialMiner supports the following types of feeds:

• Facebook

• Twitter
Campaign management

• Groups feeds into campaigns to organize all posting activity related to a product category or business objective

• Produces metrics on campaign activity

• Provides the ability to configure multiple campaigns to search for customer postings on specific products or services

• Groups social contacts for handling by the social media customer care team

• Enables filtering of social contacts based on preconfigured campaign filters to focus campaign searches
Route and queue social contacts

• Enables routing of social contacts to skilled customer care representatives in the contact center

• Draws on expertise in the enterprise by allowing multiple people in the enterprise to work together to handle responses to customer postings through shared work queues

• Enables automated distribution of work to improve efficiency and effectiveness of social media engagement
Tagging

• Allows work to be routed to the appropriate team by grouping each post or social contact into different categories; for example, a post can be marked with the “customer_support” tag; this post will then appear on a customer support agent’s queue for processing
Social media customer care metrics

• Provides detailed metrics on social media customer care activities, campaign reports, and team reports

• Measures work and results

• Manages to service-level goals

• Supports brand management

• Optimizes staffing

• Includes dashboarding of social media posting activity when Cisco Unified Intelligence Center is used
Reporting for social contacts

• Provides a reporting database that can be accessed using any reporting tool, including Cisco Unified Intelligence Center

• Enables customer care management to accurately report on and track social media interactions by the contact center
OpenSocial-compliant gadgets

Representational State Transfer (REST) application programming interfaces (APIs)

• Provides flexible user interface options

• Enables extensive opportunities for customization
Optional integration with full suite of Cisco Collaboration tools

• Allows you to take advantage of the full suite of Cisco Collaboration tools, including Cisco Quad, Cisco Show and Share, and Cisco Pulse technology, to help your social media customer care team quickly find answers to help customers efficiently and effectively

• Easy to maintain with existing IT personnel
Operating Environment
Cisco Unified Computing System(UCS) C-Series or B-Series Servers

• Requires a Cisco UCS C-Series or B-Series Server.

• Server consolidation means lower cost per server with Cisco UCS Servers.
Architecture
Scalability

• One server supports up to 30 simultaneous social media customer care users and 10,000 social contacts per hour.
Management
Cisco Unified Real-Time Monitoring Tool (RTMT)

• Operational management is enhanced through integration with the Cisco Unified RTMT, providing consistent application monitoring across Cisco Unified Communications Solutions.
Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP)

• SNMP with an associated MIB is supported through the Cisco Voice Operating System (VOS).
Reporting
Cisco Unified Intelligence Center

• Create customizable reports of social media customer care events using Cisco Unified Intelligence Center (purchased separately).

 

 

Thursday is for fun reading

Thats the world’s most widely read marketing textbook in slideshare format slides. You think you are a marketing guru expert at selling or promoting software- well spend 10 minutes flipping for a fun reading

and a presentation trying to be the worlds best presentation by putting social causes, geeky languages, hot looks in the same slides – Hi It is BO (not Barack Obama)

and if you are like me and suck at presentations , but unlike me would like to get better at presentations

if you are still reading this you probably have too much time on a Friday, so here is one YouTube poetry video I created while in a graphics design course in Vol State- it’s a mashuo of 12 poems, some Prezi, some music by  that big proft making Google machine called You Tub

Is 21 st century cloud computing same as 1960's time sharing

Diagram showing three main types of cloud comp...
Image via Wikipedia

and yes Prof Goodnight, cloud computing is not time sharing. (Dr J was on a roll there- bashing open source AND cloud computing in the SAME interview at http://www.cbronline.com/news/sas-ceo-says-cep-open-source-and-cloud-bi-have-limited-appeal)

What was time sharing? In the 1960’s when people had longer hair, listened to the Beatles and IBM actually owned ALL computers-

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Time-sharing

or is it?

The Internet has brought the general concept of time-sharing back into popularity. Expensive corporate server farms costing millions can host thousands of customers all sharing the same common resources. As with the early serial terminals, websites operate primarily in bursts of activity followed by periods of idle time. This bursting nature permits the service to be used by many website customers at once, and none of them notice any delays in communications until the servers start to get very busy.

What is 21 st century cloud computing? Well… they are still writing papers to define it BUT http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cloud_computing

Cloud computing is Web-based processing, whereby shared resources, software, and information are provided to computers and other devices (such as smartphones) on demand over the Internet.

 

 

Is 21 st century cloud computing same as 1960’s time sharing

Diagram showing three main types of cloud comp...
Image via Wikipedia

and yes Prof Goodnight, cloud computing is not time sharing. (Dr J was on a roll there- bashing open source AND cloud computing in the SAME interview at http://www.cbronline.com/news/sas-ceo-says-cep-open-source-and-cloud-bi-have-limited-appeal)

What was time sharing? In the 1960’s when people had longer hair, listened to the Beatles and IBM actually owned ALL computers-

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Time-sharing

or is it?

The Internet has brought the general concept of time-sharing back into popularity. Expensive corporate server farms costing millions can host thousands of customers all sharing the same common resources. As with the early serial terminals, websites operate primarily in bursts of activity followed by periods of idle time. This bursting nature permits the service to be used by many website customers at once, and none of them notice any delays in communications until the servers start to get very busy.

What is 21 st century cloud computing? Well… they are still writing papers to define it BUT http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cloud_computing

Cloud computing is Web-based processing, whereby shared resources, software, and information are provided to computers and other devices (such as smartphones) on demand over the Internet.

 

 

Open Source's worst enemy is itself not Microsoft/SAS/SAP/Oracle

The decision of quality open source makers to offer their software at bargain basement prices even to enterprise customers who are used to pay prices many times more-pricing is the reason open source software is taking a long time to command respect in enterprise software.

I hate to be the messenger who brings the bad news to my open source brethren-

but their worst nightmare is not the actions of their proprietary competitors like Oracle, SAP, SAS, Microsoft ( they hate each other even more than open source )

nor the collective marketing tactics which are textbook like (but referred as Fear Uncertainty Doubt by those outside that golden quartet)- it is their own communities and their own cheap pricing.

It is community action which prevents them from offering their software by ridiculously low bargain basement prices. James Dixon, head geek and founder at Pentaho has a point when he says traditional metrics like revenue need o be adjusted for this impact in his article at http://jamesdixon.wordpress.com/2010/11/02/comparing-open-source-and-proprietary-software-markets/

But James, why offer software to enterprise customers at one tenth the next competitor- one reason is open source companies more often than not compete more with their free community version software than with big proprietary packages.

Communities including academics are used to free- hey how about paying say 1$ for each download.

There are two million R users- if say even 50 % of them  paid 1 $ as a lifetime license fee- you could sponsor enough new packages than twenty years of Google Summer of Code does right now.

Secondly, this pricing can easily be adjusted by shifting the licensing to say free for businesses less than 2 people (even for the enhanced corporate software version not just the plain vanilla community software thus further increasing the spread of the plain vanilla versions)- for businesses from 10 to 20 people offer a six month trial rather than one month trial.

– but adjust the pricing to much more realistic levels compared to competing software. Make enterprise software pay a real value.

That’s the only way to earn respect. as well as a few dollars more.

As for SAS, it is time it started ridiculing Python now that it has accepted R.

Python is even MORE powerful than R in some use cases for stat computing

Dixon’s Pentaho and the Jaspersoft/ Revolution combo are nice _ I tested both Jasper and Pentaho thanks to these remarks this week 🙂  (see slides at http://www.jaspersoft.com/sites/default/files/downloads/events/Analytics%20-Jaspersoft-SEP2010.pdf or http://www.revolutionanalytics.com/news-events/free-webinars/2010/deploying-r/index.php )

Pentaho and Jasper do give good great graphics in BI (Graphical display in BI is not a SAS forte though probably I dont know how much they cross sell JMP to BI customers- probably too much JMP is another division syndrome there)

Open Source’s worst enemy is itself not Microsoft/SAS/SAP/Oracle

The decision of quality open source makers to offer their software at bargain basement prices even to enterprise customers who are used to pay prices many times more-pricing is the reason open source software is taking a long time to command respect in enterprise software.

I hate to be the messenger who brings the bad news to my open source brethren-

but their worst nightmare is not the actions of their proprietary competitors like Oracle, SAP, SAS, Microsoft ( they hate each other even more than open source )

nor the collective marketing tactics which are textbook like (but referred as Fear Uncertainty Doubt by those outside that golden quartet)- it is their own communities and their own cheap pricing.

It is community action which prevents them from offering their software by ridiculously low bargain basement prices. James Dixon, head geek and founder at Pentaho has a point when he says traditional metrics like revenue need o be adjusted for this impact in his article at http://jamesdixon.wordpress.com/2010/11/02/comparing-open-source-and-proprietary-software-markets/

But James, why offer software to enterprise customers at one tenth the next competitor- one reason is open source companies more often than not compete more with their free community version software than with big proprietary packages.

Communities including academics are used to free- hey how about paying say 1$ for each download.

There are two million R users- if say even 50 % of them  paid 1 $ as a lifetime license fee- you could sponsor enough new packages than twenty years of Google Summer of Code does right now.

Secondly, this pricing can easily be adjusted by shifting the licensing to say free for businesses less than 2 people (even for the enhanced corporate software version not just the plain vanilla community software thus further increasing the spread of the plain vanilla versions)- for businesses from 10 to 20 people offer a six month trial rather than one month trial.

– but adjust the pricing to much more realistic levels compared to competing software. Make enterprise software pay a real value.

That’s the only way to earn respect. as well as a few dollars more.

As for SAS, it is time it started ridiculing Python now that it has accepted R.

Python is even MORE powerful than R in some use cases for stat computing

Dixon’s Pentaho and the Jaspersoft/ Revolution combo are nice _ I tested both Jasper and Pentaho thanks to these remarks this week 🙂  (see slides at http://www.jaspersoft.com/sites/default/files/downloads/events/Analytics%20-Jaspersoft-SEP2010.pdf or http://www.revolutionanalytics.com/news-events/free-webinars/2010/deploying-r/index.php )

Pentaho and Jasper do give good great graphics in BI (Graphical display in BI is not a SAS forte though probably I dont know how much they cross sell JMP to BI customers- probably too much JMP is another division syndrome there)

Amazon S3 slashes prices

Outline of a cloud containing text 'The Cloud'
Image via Wikipedia

From Amazon- November seems like a Thanksgiving for prices as well-

————————————————————————————————

lowered the threshold for our volume based discounts from 50 terabytes to 1 terabyte, extending volume pricing discounts to more customers. Here’s a summary of the changes:

Old         New
First 1TB           $0.150    $0.140
Next 49TB         $0.150    $0.125
Next 50TB         $0.140    $0.110
Next 400TB       $0.130    $0.110
Next 500TB       $0.105    $0.095
Next 4000TB     $0.080    $0.080 (no change)
Over 5000TB     $0.055    $0.055 (no change)

These prices apply to Amazon S3 Standard storage in the US-Standard, EU-West, and AP-East regions. The new lower prices for the US-West region and Reduced Redundancy Storage can be found on the Amazon S3 Detail Page.