New RCommander with ggplot #rstats

 

My favorite GUI (or one of them) R Commander has a relatively new plugin called KMGGplot2. Until now Deducer was the only GUI with ggplot features , but the much lighter and more popular R Commander has been a long champion in people wanting to pick up R quickly.

 

http://cran.r-project.org/web/packages/RcmdrPlugin.KMggplot2/

RcmdrPlugin.KMggplot2: Rcmdr Plug-In for Kaplan-Meier Plot and Other Plots by Using the ggplot2 Package

 

As you can see by the screenshot- it makes ggplot even easier for people (like R  newbies and experienced folks alike)

 

This package is an R Commander plug-in for Kaplan-Meier plot and other plots by using the ggplot2 package.

Version: 0.1-0
Depends: R (≥ 2.15.0), stats, methods, grid, Rcmdr (≥ 1.8-4), ggplot2 (≥ 0.9.1)
Imports: tcltk2 (≥ 1.2-3), RColorBrewer (≥ 1.0-5), scales (≥ 0.2.1), survival (≥ 2.36-14)
Published: 2012-05-18
Author: Triad sou. and Kengo NAGASHIMA
Maintainer: Triad sou. <triadsou at gmail.com>
License: GPL-2
CRAN checks: RcmdrPlugin.KMggplot2 results

 

----------------------------------------------------------------
NEWS file for the RcmdrPlugin.KMggplot2 package
----------------------------------------------------------------

----------------------------------------------------------------

Changes in version 0.1-0 (2012-05-18)

 o Restructuring implementation approach for efficient
   maintenance.
 o Added options() for storing package specific options (e.g.,
   font size, font family, ...).
 o Added a theme: theme_simple().
 o Added a theme element: theme_rect2().
 o Added a list box for facet_xx() functions in some menus
   (Thanks to Professor Murtaza Haider).
 o Kaplan-Meier plot: added confidence intervals.
 o Box plot: added violin plots.
 o Bar chart for discrete variables: deleted dynamite plots.
 o Bar chart for discrete variables: added stacked bar charts.
 o Scatter plot matrix: added univariate plots at diagonal
   positions (ggplot2::plotmatrix).
 o Deleted the dummy data for histograms, which is large in
   size.

----------------------------------------------------------------

Changes in version 0.0-4 (2011-07-28)

 o Fixed "scale_y_continuous(formatter = "percent")" to
   "scale_y_continuous(labels = percent)" for ggplot2
   (>= 0.9.0).
 o Fixed "legend = FALSE" to "show_guide = FALSE" for
   ggplot2 (>= 0.9.0).
 o Fixed the DESCRIPTION file for ggplot2 (>= 0.9.0) dependency.

----------------------------------------------------------------

Changes in version 0.0-3 (2011-07-28; FIRST RELEASE VERSION)

 o Kaplan-Meier plot: Show no. at risk table on outside.
 o Histogram: Color coding.
 o Histogram: Density estimation.
 o Q-Q plot: Create plots based on a maximum likelihood estimate
   for the parameters of the selected theoretical distribution.
 o Q-Q plot: Create plots based on a user-specified theoretical
   distribution.
 o Box plot / Errorbar plot: Box plot.
 o Box plot / Errorbar plot: Mean plus/minus S.D.
 o Box plot / Errorbar plot: Mean plus/minus S.D. (Bar plot).
 o Box plot / Errorbar plot: 95 percent Confidence interval
   (t distribution).
 o Box plot / Errorbar plot: 95 percent Confidence interval
   (bootstrap).
 o Scatter plot: Fitting a linear regression.
 o Scatter plot: Smoothing with LOESS for small datasets or GAM
   with a cubic regression basis for large data.
 o Scatter plot matrix: Fitting a linear regression.
 o Scatter plot matrix: Smoothing with LOESS for small datasets
   or GAM with a cubic regression basis for large data.
 o Line chart: Normal line chart.
 o Line chart: Line char with a step function.
 o Line chart: Area plot.
 o Pie chart: Pie chart.
 o Bar chart for discrete variables: Bar chart for discrete
   variables.
 o Contour plot: Color coding.
 o Contour plot: Heat map.
 o Distribution plot: Normal distribution.
 o Distribution plot: t distribution.
 o Distribution plot: Chi-square distribution.
 o Distribution plot: F distribution.
 o Distribution plot: Exponential distribution.
 o Distribution plot: Uniform distribution.
 o Distribution plot: Beta distribution.
 o Distribution plot: Cauchy distribution.
 o Distribution plot: Logistic distribution.
 o Distribution plot: Log-normal distribution.
 o Distribution plot: Gamma distribution.
 o Distribution plot: Weibull distribution.
 o Distribution plot: Binomial distribution.
 o Distribution plot: Poisson distribution.
 o Distribution plot: Geometric distribution.
 o Distribution plot: Hypergeometric distribution.
 o Distribution plot: Negative binomial distribution.

Oracle R Updated!

Interesting message from https://blogs.oracle.com/R/ the latest R blog

 

_——–_

Oracle just released the latest update to Oracle R Enterprise, version 1.1. This release includes the Oracle R Distribution (based on open source R, version 2.13.2), an improved server installation, and much more.  The key new features include:

  • Extended Server Support: New support for Windows 32 and 64-bit server components, as well as continuing support for Linux 64-bit server components
  • Improved Installation: Linux 64-bit server installation now provides robust status updates and prerequisite checks
  • Performance Improvements: Improved performance for embedded R script execution calculations

In addition, the updated ROracle package, which is used with Oracle R Enterprise, now reads date data by conversion to character strings.

We encourage you download Oracle software for evaluation from the Oracle Technology Network. See these links for R-related software: Oracle R DistributionOracle R EnterpriseROracleOracle R Connector for Hadoop.  As always, we welcome comments and questions on the Oracle R Forum.

 

 

Oracle R Distribution 2-13.2 Update Available

Oracle has released an update to the Oracle R Distribution, an Oracle-supported distribution of open source R. Oracle R Distribution 2-13.2 now contains the ability to dynamically link the following libraries on both Windows and Linux:

  • The Intel Math Kernel Library (MKL) on Intel chips
  • The AMD Core Math Library (ACML) on AMD chips

 

To take advantage of the performance enhancements provided by Intel MKL or AMD ACML in Oracle R Distribution, simply add the MKL or ACML shared library directory to the LD_LIBRARY_PATH system environment variable. This automatically enables MKL or ACML to make use of all available processors, vastly speeding up linear algebra computations and eliminating the need to recompile R.  Even on a single core, the optimized algorithms in the Intel MKL libraries are faster than using R’s standard BLAS library.

Open-source R is linked to NetLib’s BLAS libraries, but they are not multi-threaded and only use one core. While R’s internal BLAS are efficient for most computations, it’s possible to recompile R to link to a different, multi-threaded BLAS library to improve performance on eligible calculations. Compiling and linking to R yourself can be involved, but for many, the significantly improved calculation speed justifies the effort. Oracle R Distribution notably simplifies the process of using external math libraries by enabling R to auto-load MKL orACML. For R commands that don’t link to BLAS code, taking advantage of database parallelism usingembedded R execution in Oracle R Enterprise is the route to improved performance.

For more information about rebuilding R with different BLAS libraries, see the linear algebra section in the R Installation and Administration manual. As always, the Oracle R Distribution is available as a free download to anyone. Questions and comments are welcome on the Oracle R Forum.

Easter Eggs in #Rstats

Yes.

Cite-http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Easter_egg_(media)

A virtual Easter egg is an intentional hidden messagein-joke, or feature in a work such as a computer programweb pagevideo gamemoviebook, or crossword. The term was coined — according to Warren Robinett — by Atari after they were pointed to the secret message left by Robinett in the game Adventure.[1] It draws a parallel with the custom of the Easter egg hunt observed in many Western nations as well as the last Russian imperial family’s tradition of giving elaborately jeweled egg-shaped creations by Carl Fabergé which contained hidden surprises

In R.

Cite-http://stackoverflow.com/questions/7910270/are-there-any-easter-eggs-in-base-r-or-in-major-packages

I like this

just type

example(readLine)

and these two

on 32 bit R type

memory.limit(4096)

and on any version try four question marks

Perhaps the prettiest eggs are the demos in animation package.

But there is magic in asking for help on internal functions in R

Just type-

?.Internal

and you get the sobering thought that you probably are a R Muggle

Call an Internal Function

Description

.Internal performs a call to an internal code which is built in to the R interpreter.

Only true R wizards should even consider using this function, and only R developers can add to the list of internal functions.

Usage

 .Internal(call)

Arguments

call a call expression

See Also

.Primitive, .External (the nearest equivalent available to users).

I liked that I could see the actual internal functions in svn at http://svn.r-project.org/R/trunk/src/main/names.c

The opening of the internals document floored me.

It must have been a curious year in 2003-4 when the copyright of R was held (briefly it seems) by the R Foundation and also by the R Development Core Team. (which sounds better?)

*  R : A Computer Language for Statistical Data Analysis
 *  Copyright (C) 1995, 1996  Robert Gentleman and Ross Ihaka
 *  Copyright (C) 1997--2012  The R Development Core Team
 *  Copyright (C) 2003, 2004  The R Foundation

My contribution

R help discourages for loop

Try ??for or ?for

you go into a loop till you hit escape

If you want more-just write
 .Internal(inspect(ls())) at the end of your  R program.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Color Palettes in R using RColorBrewer #rstats

The lovely colors at http://ColorBrewer.org can be used for much better color palettes in R.

library(RColorBrewer)

display.brewer.all() 

and we use the function brewer.pal(N,”Name”) as the col  parameter for the new color palettes

where we can see name of palettes  from the list above

data(VADeaths)
par(mfrow=c(2,3))
 hist(VADeaths,col=brewer.pal(3,"Set3"),main="Set3 3 colors")
 hist(VADeaths,col=brewer.pal(3,"Set2"),main="Set2 3 colors")
 hist(VADeaths,col=brewer.pal(3,"Set1"),main="Set1 3 colors")
 hist(VADeaths,col=brewer.pal(8,"Set3"),main="Set3 8 colors")
 hist(VADeaths,col=brewer.pal(8,"Greys"),main="Greys 8 colors")
 hist(VADeaths,col=brewer.pal(8,"Greens"),main="Greens 8 colors")
Created by Pretty R at inside-R.org

Rplot7

Colors from [http://www.ColorBrewer.org] by Cynthia A. Brewer, Geography, Pennsylvania State University
• Erich Neuwirth (2011). RColorBrewer: ColorBrewer palettes. R package version 1.0-5. [http://CRAN.R-project.org/package=RColorBrewer]
Note-ColorBrewer is Copyright (c) 2002 Cynthia Brewer, Mark Harrower, and The Pennsylvania State University. All rights reserved. The ColorBrewer palettes have been included in the R package with permission of the copyright holder.

send email by R

For automated report delivery I have often used send email options in BASE SAS. For R, for scheduling tasks and sending me automated mails on completion of tasks I have two R options and 1 Windows OS scheduling option. Note red font denotes the parameters that should be changed. Anything else should NOT be changed.

Option 1-

Use the mail package at

http://cran.r-project.org/web/packages/mail/mail.pdf

> library(mail)

Attaching package: ‘mail’

The following object(s) are masked from ‘package:sendmailR’:

sendmail

>
> sendmail(“ohri2007@gmail.com“, subject=”Notification from R“,message=“Calculation finished!”, password=”rmail”)
[1] “Message was sent to ohri2007@gmail.com! You have 19 messages left.”

Disadvantage- Only 20 email messages by IP address per day. (but thats ok!)

Option 2-

use sendmailR package at http://cran.r-project.org/web/packages/sendmailR/sendmailR.pdf

install.packages()
library(sendmailR)
from <- sprintf(“<sendmailR@%s>”, Sys.info()[4])
to <- “<ohri2007@gmail.com>”
subject <- “Hello from R
body <- list(“It works!”, mime_part(iris))
sendmail(from, to, subject, body,control=list(smtpServer=”ASPMX.L.GOOGLE.COM”))

 

 

BiocInstaller version 1.2.1, ?biocLite for help
> install.packages(“sendmailR”)
Installing package(s) into ‘/home/ubuntu/R/library’
(as ‘lib’ is unspecified)
also installing the dependency ‘base64’

trying URL ‘http://cran.at.r-project.org/src/contrib/base64_1.1.tar.gz&#8217;
Content type ‘application/x-gzip’ length 61109 bytes (59 Kb)
opened URL
==================================================
downloaded 59 Kb

trying URL ‘http://cran.at.r-project.org/src/contrib/sendmailR_1.1-1.tar.gz&#8217;
Content type ‘application/x-gzip’ length 6399 bytes
opened URL
==================================================
downloaded 6399 bytes

BiocInstaller version 1.2.1, ?biocLite for help
* installing *source* package ‘base64’ …
** package ‘base64’ successfully unpacked and MD5 sums checked
** libs
gcc -std=gnu99 -I/usr/local/lib64/R/include -I/usr/local/include -fpic -g -O2 -c base64.c -o base64.o
gcc -std=gnu99 -shared -L/usr/local/lib64 -o base64.so base64.o -L/usr/local/lib64/R/lib -lR
installing to /home/ubuntu/R/library/base64/libs
** R
** preparing package for lazy loading
** help
*** installing help indices
** building package indices …
** testing if installed package can be loaded
BiocInstaller version 1.2.1, ?biocLite for help

* DONE (base64)
BiocInstaller version 1.2.1, ?biocLite for help
* installing *source* package ‘sendmailR’ …
** package ‘sendmailR’ successfully unpacked and MD5 sums checked
** R
** preparing package for lazy loading
** help
*** installing help indices
** building package indices …
** testing if installed package can be loaded
BiocInstaller version 1.2.1, ?biocLite for help

* DONE (sendmailR)

The downloaded packages are in
‘/tmp/RtmpsM222s/downloaded_packages’
> library(sendmailR)
Loading required package: base64
> from <- sprintf(“<sendmailR@%s>”, Sys.info()[4])
> to <- “<ohri2007@gmail.com>”
> subject <- “Hello from R”
> body <- list(“It works!”, mime_part(iris))
> sendmail(from, to, subject, body,
+ control=list(smtpServer=”ASPMX.L.GOOGLE.COM”))
$code
[1] “221”

$msg
[1] “2.0.0 closing connection ff2si17226764qab.40”

Disadvantage-This worked when I used the Amazon Cloud using the BioConductor AMI (for free 2 hours) at http://www.bioconductor.org/help/cloud/

It did NOT work when I tried it use it from my Windows 7 Home Premium PC from my Indian ISP (!!) .

It gave me this error

or in wait_for(250) :
SMTP Error: 5.7.1 [180.215.172.252] The IP you’re using to send mail is not authorized

 

PAUSE–

ps Why do this (send email by R)?

Note you can add either of the two programs of the end of the code that you want to be notified automatically. (like daily tasks)

This is mostly done for repeated business analytics tasks (like reports and analysis that need to be run at specific periods of time)

pps- What else can I do with this?

Can be modified to include sms or tweets  or even blog by email by modifying the   “to”  location appropriately.

3) Using Windows Task Scheduler to run R codes automatically (either the above)

or just sending an email

got to Start>  All Programs > Accessories >System Tools > Task Scheduler ( or by default C:Windowssystem32taskschd.msc)

Create a basic task

Now you can use this to run your daily/or scheduled R code  or you can send yourself email as well.

and modify the parameters- note the SMTP server (you can use the ones for google in example 2 at ASPMX.L.GOOGLE.COM)

and check if it works!

 

Related

 Geeky Things , Bro

Configuring IIS on your Windows 7 Home Edition-

note path to do this is-

Control Panel>All Control Panel Items> Program and Features>Turn Windows features on or off> Internet Information Services

and

http://stackoverflow.com/questions/709635/sending-mail-from-batch-file

 

JMP 10 released

JMP , the visual data exploration, statistical quality control software from SAS Institute launched version 10 of its software today.

Source-http://jmp.com/about/events/webcasts/jmp_webcast.shtml?name=jmp10

JMP 10 includes:

Numerous enhancements to the drag-and-drop Graph Builder, including a new iPad application.

A cutting-edge Control Chart Builder to create process control charts with drag-and-drop ease.

New reliability capabilities, including growth and forecast models.

Additions and improvements for sorting and filtering data, design of experiments, statistical modeling, scripting, add-in and application development, script debugging and more.

From JohnSall’s blog post at http://blogs.sas.com/content/jmp/2012/03/20/discover-more-with-jmp-10/

Much of the development centered on four focus areas:

1. Graph Builder everywhere. The Graph Builder platform itself has new features like Heatmap and Treemap, an elements palette and properties panel, making the choices more visible. But Graph Builder also has some descendents now, including the new Control Chart Builder, which makes creating control charts an interactive process. In addition, some of the drag-and-drop features that are used to change columns in Graph Builder are also available in Distribution, Fit Y by X, and a few other places. Finally, Graph Builder has been ported to the iPad. For the first time, you can use JMP for exploration and presentation on a mobile device for free. So just think of Graph Builder as gradually taking over in lots of places.

2. Expert-driven design.reliability, measurement systems, and partial least squares analyses.

3. Performance.  this release has the most new multithreading so far

4. Application development

You can read more here –http://jmp.com/about/events/webcasts/jmpwebcast_detail.shtml?reglink=70130000001r9IP

Text Mining Barack Obama using R #rstats

  • We copy and paste President Barack Obama’s “Yes We Can” speech in a text document and read it in. For a word cloud we need a dataframe with two columns, one with words and the the other with frequency.We read in the transcript from http://www.nytimes.com/2008/01/08/us/politics/08text-obama.html?pagewanted=all&_r=0  and paste in the file located in the local directory- /home/ajay/Desktop/new. Note tm is a powerful package and will read ALL the text documents within the particular folder

library(tm)

library(wordcloud)

txt2=”/home/ajay/Desktop/new”

b=Corpus(DirSource(txt2), readerControl = list(language = “eng”))

> b b b tdm m1 v1 d1 wordcloud(d1$word,d1$freq)

Now it seems we need to remove some of the very commonly occuring words like “the” and “and”. We are not using the standard stopwords in english (the tm package provides that see Chapter 13 Text Mining case studies), as the words “we” and “can” are also included .

> b tdm m1 v1 d1 wordcloud(d1$word,d1$freq)

But let’s see how the wordcloud changes if we remove all English Stopwords.

> b tdm m1 v1 d1 wordcloud(d1$word,d1$freq)

and you can draw your own conclusions from the content of this famous speech based on your political preferences.

Politicians can give interesting speeches but they may be full of simple sounding words…..

Citation-

1. Ingo Feinerer (2012). tm: Text Mining Package. R package version0.5-7.1.

Ingo Feinerer, Kurt Hornik, and David Meyer (2008). Text Mining
Infrastructure in R. Journal of Statistical Software 25/5. URL:
http://www.jstatsoft.org/v25/i05/

2. Ian Fellows (2012). wordcloud: Word Clouds. R package version 2.0.

http://CRAN.R-project.org/package=wordcloud

3. You can see more than 100 of Obama’s speeches at http://obamaspeeches.com/

Quote- numbers dont lie, people do.

.