Using Two Operating Systems for RATTLE, #Rstats Data Mining GUI

Using a virtual partition is slightly better than using a dual boot system. That is because you can keep the specialized operating system (usually Linux) within the main operating system (usually Windows), browse and alternate between the two operating system just using a simple command, and can utilize the advantages of both operating system.

Also you can create project specific discs for enhanced security.

In my (limited ) Mac experience, the comparisons of each operating system are-

1) Mac-  Both robust and aesthetically designed OS, the higher price and hardware-lockin for Mac remains a disadvantage. Also many stats and analytical software just wont work on the Mac

2) Windows- It is cheaper than Mac and easier to use than Linux. Also has the most compatibility with applications (usually when not crashing)

3) Linux- The lightest and most customized software in the OS class, free to use, and has many lite versions for newbies. Not compatible with mainstream corporate IT infrastructure as of 2011.

I personally use VMWare Player for creating the virtual disk (as much more convenient than the wubi.exe method)  from http://www.vmware.com/support/product-support/player/  (and downloadable from http://downloads.vmware.com/d/info/desktop_downloads/vmware_player/3_0)

That enables me to use Ubuntu on the alternative OS- keeping my Windows 7 for some Windows specific applications . For software like Rattle, the R data mining GUI , it helps to use two operating systems, in view of difficulties in GTK+.

Installing Rattle on Windows 7 is a major pain thanks to backward compatibility issues and version issues of GTK, but it installs on Ubuntu like a breeze- and it is very very convenient to switch between the two operating systems

Download Rattle from http://rattle.togaware.com/ and test it on the dual OS arrangement to see yourself.

 

 

 

 

 

Troubleshooting Rattle Installation- Data Mining R GUI

Screenshot of Synaptic Package Manager running...
Image via Wikipedia

I really find the Rattle GUI very very nice and easy to do any data mining task. The software is available from http://rattle.togaware.com/

The only issue is Rattle can be quite difficult to install due to dependencies on GTK+

After fiddling for a couple of years- this is what I did

1) Created dual boot OS- Basically downloaded the netbook remix from http://ubuntu.com I created a dual boot OS so you can choose at the beginning whether to use Windows or Ubuntu Linux in that session.  Alternatively you can download VM Player www.vmware.com/products/player/ if you want to do both

2) Download R packages using Ubuntu packages and Install GTK+ dependencies before that.

GTK + Requires

  1. Libglade
  2. Glib
  3. Cairo
  4. Pango
  5. ATK

If  you are a Linux newbie like me who doesnt get the sudo apt get, tar, cd, make , install rigmarole – scoot over to synaptic software packages or just the main ubuntu software centre and download these packages one by one.

For R Dependencies, you need

  • PMML
  • XML
  • RGTK2

Again use r-cran as the prefix to these package names and simply install (almost the same way Windows does it easily -double click)

see http://packages.ubuntu.com/search?suite=lucid&searchon=names&keywords=r-cran

4) Install Rattle from source

http://rattle.togaware.com/rattle-download.html

Advanced users can download the Rattle source packages directly:

Save theses to your hard disk (e.g., to your Desktop) but don’t extract them. Then, on GNU/Linux run the install command shown below. This command is entered into a terminal window:

  • R CMD INSTALL rattle_2.6.0.tar.gz

After installation-

5) Type library(rattle) and rattle.info to get messages on what R packages to update for a proper functioning

</code>

> library(rattle)
Rattle: Graphical interface for data mining using R.
Version 2.6.0 Copyright (c) 2006-2010 Togaware Pty Ltd.
Type 'rattle()' to shake, rattle, and roll your data.
> rattle.info()
Rattle: version 2.6.0
R: version 2.11.1 (2010-05-31) (Revision 52157)

Sysname: Linux
Release: 2.6.35-23-generic
Version: #41-Ubuntu SMP Wed Nov 24 10:18:49 UTC 2010
Nodename: k1-M725R
Machine: i686
Login: k1ng
User: k1ng

Installed Dependencies
RGtk2: version 2.20.3
pmml: version 1.2.26
colorspace: version 1.0-1
cairoDevice: version 2.14
doBy: version 4.1.2
e1071: version 1.5-24
ellipse: version 0.3-5
foreign: version 0.8-41
gdata: version 2.8.1
gtools: version 2.6.2
gplots: version 2.8.0
gWidgetsRGtk2: version 0.0-69
Hmisc: version 3.8-3
kernlab: version 0.9-12
latticist: version 0.9-43
Matrix: version 0.999375-46
mice: version 2.4
network: version 1.5-1
nnet: version 7.3-1
party: version 0.9-99991
playwith: version 0.9-53
randomForest: version 4.5-36 upgrade available 4.6-2
rggobi: version 2.1.16
survival: version 2.36-2
XML: version 3.2-0
bitops: version 1.0-4.1

Upgrade the packages with:

 > install.packages(c("randomForest"))

<code>

Now upgrade whatever package rattle.info tells to upgrade.

This is much simpler and less frustrating than some of the other ways to install Rattle.

If all goes well, you will see this familiar screen popup when you type

>rattle()

 

Linux for busy people

For people who always wanted to try out Linux but never had the time or the energy ( or courage to risk  moving to a Linux only environment) here is a great application which allows you to keep Linux as well as Windows for double booting environment . You need 256 mb ram and 5 gb hard disk and you are good to go. It is a single click download and install to try out Ubuntu Linux and it preserves your Windows too.

If you wanted to try out R with Linux , then it is an easy way out for you ( and me).

Saves quite a lot of money per desktop per OS and per office productivity software.

Sounds good to be true well the site is http://wubi-installer.org/

Here are some screenshots courtesy of the site itself-

Ubuntu Desktop Preview

And if you need to install your favorite applications (like R , Subversion) and don’t want to command line your way the solution is quite simple It is called Synaptic and it is free and downloadable here

http://www.nongnu.org/synaptic/index.html