Best of Google Plus – Week 1 Top1/0

Stuff I like from Google Plus meme- animated GIFS  are just one of them-

  1. LIST OF GOOGLERS ON GOOGLE+

OK, this was fun to put together — love how active the Googlers are on this platform! Please feel free to add anyone I missed and share this. Circle the ones that most interest you based on what they do, or circle them all as I did 🙂

Co-Founders
+Sergey Brin
+Larry Page

VPs/Senior VPs
+Vic Gundotra (Engineering)
+Bradley Horowitz (Product Management)
+Jeff Huber (Commerce & Local)
+Marissa Mayer (Local, Maps & Location Services)

Community Managers
+Brian Rose
+Toby Stein
+Natalie Villalobos

Product Managers
+Anish Acharya (Google+ Mobile)
+Shimrit Ben-Yair
+Frances Haugen (Google+ Profiles)
+Caroline McCarthy (Marketing)
+Jonathan McPhie
+Joe Rideout
+Punit Soni (Google+ Mobile)

Engineering Directors/Managers
+Chee Chew
+Dave Besbris
+Chris Millikin

Software Engineers
+Eric W. Barndollar (Google+)
+Andrew Bunner (Google+)
+David Byttow
+Eric Cattell (Social Graph Tech Lead)
+John Costigan (Google Profiles)
+Matt Cutts (Webspam)
+Pavan Desikan (Google+/Gmail)
+Kelly Ellis
+Trey Harris (Site Reliability)
+Griff Hazen
+Andy Hertzfeld
+Matt Keoshkerian
+Todd Knight
+Jean-Christophe Lilot
+Lan Liu
+Vincent Mo (Google+ Photos)
+Dobromir Montauk (Google+ Infrastructure)
+Stephen Ng (Gmail)
+Owen Prater
+Joseph Smarr (Technical)
+Martin Strauss
+Na Tang
+Yonatan Zunger (Social)

Consumer Operations Manager
+Michael Hermeston (Google+ Support)

Developer Advocates
+Chris Chabot (Developer Relations)
+Timothy Jordan

Designers
+Brett Lider (Product/User Experience)
+Jonathan Terleski (Google+)
+Charles Warren (User Experience Lead, Google Social)

Program Managers
+Julian Harris (Technical)
+Adam Lasnik (Google Map Maker)

Tech Lead Manager
+Natalie Glance (Google Shopping)
Test Engineer
+Erick Fejta (Tester for Google Storage)

Account Executive
+Dave Miller (Local & Education)

President, Enterprise
+Dave Girouard (Cloud Apps)
3. Jokes-
I have a friend on Facebook that seemed suicidal, said he was standing on a ledge….so I poked him

4.Google Squash

5.Social Media Explained

6. Google Plus slaps Facebook AND Troopers Googling for Droids

7. Why did Google Wave Fail

8. When Google+ is available to the public..

9. Evolution

10. Safe Tweeting

Special Mentions-

 

 

 

 

Analyzing Conversations on Twitter

If you are a marketing , analyst relationship, public relationship or a product manager who uses or abuses social media, you sometimes need to track what influencers and analysts are saying. A tool called Bettween allows you to capture public conversations between two influential (or interesting) tweeps.

See conversations between Neil Raden http://www.beyeblogs.com/raden/ and Curt Monash http://www.dbms2.com/ two noted BI gurus

http://bettween.com/neilraden/curtmonash

  • @NEILRADEN66
  • @CURTMONASH61
  • TOTAL MESSAGES127
  • SHARE CONVERSATION


unless Google decides to license its Wave technology to Twitter for separate encrypted , or public tweets. 🙂 They do share some history and employees (cough cough) or Twitter waits to create or better its public /protected tweet mode to be more granular

http://bettween.com/neilraden/curtmonash#statistics

tools to analyze Twitter conversations in SAS

Brief Interview Timo Elliott

Here is a brief interview with Timo Elliott.Timo Elliott is a 19-year veteran of SAP Business Objects.

Ajay- What are the top 5 events in Business Integration and Data Visualization services you saw in 2010 and what are the top three trends you see in these in 2011.


Timo-

Top five events in 2010:

(1) Back to strong market growth. IT spending plummeted last year (BI continued to grow, but more slowly than previous years). This year, organizations reopened their wallets and funded new analytics initiatives — all the signs indicate that BI market growth will be double that of 2009.

(2) The launch of the iPad. Mobile BI has been around for years, but the iPad opened the floodgates of organizations taking a serious look at mobile analytics — and the easy-to-use, executive-friendly iPad dashboards have considerably raised the profile of analytics projects inside organizations.

(3) Data warehousing got exciting again. Decades of incremental improvements (column databases, massively parallel processing, appliances, in-memory processing…) all came together with robust commercial offers that challenged existing data storage and calculation methods. And new “NoSQL” approaches, designed for the new problems of massive amounts of less-structured web data, started moving into the mainstream.

(4) The end of Google Wave, the start of social BI.Google Wave was launched as a rethink of how we could bring together email, instant messaging, and social networks. While Google decided to close down the technology this year, it has left its mark, notably by influencing the future of “social BI”, with several major vendors bringing out commercial products this year.

(5) The start of the big BI merge. While several small independent BI vendors reported strong growth, the major trend of the year was consolidation and integration: the BI megavendors (SAP, Oracle, IBM, Microsoft) increased their market share (sometimes by acquiring smaller vendors, e.g. IBM/SPSS and SAP/Sybase) and integrated analytics with their existing products, blurring the line between BI and other technology areas.

Top three trends next year:

(1) Analytics, reinvented. New DW techniques make it possible to do sub-second, interactive analytics directly against row-level operational data. Now BI processes and interfaces need to be rethought and redesigned to make best use of this — notably by blurring the distinctions between the “design” and “consumption” phases of BI.

(2) Corporate and personal BI come together. The ability to mix corporate and personal data for quick, pragmatic analysis is a common business need. The typical solution to the problem — extracting and combining the data into a local data store (either Excel or a departmental data mart) — pleases users, but introduces duplication and extra costs and makes a mockery of information governance. 2011 will see the rise of systems that let individuals and departments load their data into personal spaces in the corporate environment, allowing pragmatic analytic flexibility without compromising security and governance.

(3) The next generation of business applications. Where are the business applications designed to support what people really do all day, such as implementing this year’s strategy, launching new products, or acquiring another company? 2011 will see the first prototypes of people-focused, flexible, information-centric, and collaborative applications, bringing together the best of business intelligence, “enterprise 2.0”, and existing operational applications.

And one that should happen, but probably won’t:

(4) Intelligence = Information + PEOPLE. Successful analytics isn’t about technology — it’s about people, process, and culture. The biggest trend in 2011 should be organizations spending the majority of their efforts on user adoption rather than technical implementation.                 About- http://timoelliott.com/blog/about

Timo Elliott is a 19-year veteran of SAP BusinessObjects, and has spent the last twenty years working with customers around the world on information strategy.

He works closely with SAP research and innovation centers around the world to evangelize new technology prototypes.

His popular Business Analytics and SAPWeb20 blogs track innovation in analytics and social media, including topics such as augmented corporate reality, collaborative decision-making, and social network analysis.

His PowerPoint Twitter Tools lets presenters see and react to tweets in real time, embedded directly within their slides.

A popular and engaging speaker, Elliott presents regularly to IT and business audiences at international conferences, on subjects such as why BI projects fail and what to do about it, and the intersection of BI and enterprise 2.0.

Prior to Business Objects, Elliott was a computer consultant in Hong Kong and led analytics projects for Shell in New Zealand. He holds a first-class honors degree in Economics with Statistics from Bristol University, England. He blogs on http://timoelliott.com/blog/ (one of the best designed blogs in BI) . You can see more about him personal web site here and photo/sketch blog here. You should follow Timo at http://twitter.com/timoelliott

Art Credit- Timo Elliott

Related Articles

Collobrating in Conferences with Google Wave

If you have ever followed hash tags on Twitter for conferences and media events the next generation in online discussions

is clearly Google Wave. Here is a screenshot of a lot of people collaborating, discussing and in general having a conversation while events are going on at the DeFrag Con ( http://defragcon.com/2009/DEFRAG09-Home.htm )

The Google Wave collaboration method sure beats the Twitter hash tag method by a big..wave.

Screenshot

Screenshot-1