Special Issue of JSS on R GUIs

An announcement by the Journal of Statistical Software- call for papers on R GUIs. Initial deadline is December 2010 with final versions published along 2011.

Announce

Special issue of the Journal of Statistical Software on

Graphical User Interfaces for R

Editors: Pedro Valero-Mora and Ruben Ledesma

Since it original paper from Gentleman and Ihaka was published, R has managed to gain an ever-increasing percentage of academic and professional statisticians but the spread of its use among novice and occasional users of statistics have not progressed at the same pace. Among the reasons for this relative lack of impact, the lack of a GUI or point and click interface is one of the causes most widely mentioned. But, however, in the last few years, this situation has been quietly changing and a number of projects have equipped R with a number of different GUIs, ranging from the very simple to the more advanced, and providing the casual user with what could be still a new source of trouble: choosing what is the GUI for him. We may have moved from the “too few” situation to the “too many” situation
This special issue of the JSS intends as one of its main goals to offer a general overview of the different GUIs currently available for R. Thus, we think that somebody trying to find its way among different alternatives may find useful it as starting point. However, we do not want to stop in a mere listing but we want to offer a bit of a more general discussion about what could be good GUIs  for R (and how to build them). Therefore, we want to see papers submitted that discuss the whole concept of GUI in R, what elements it should include (or not), how this could be achieved, and, why not, if it is actually needed at all. Finally, despite the high success of R, this does not mean other systems may not treasure important features that we would like to see in R. Indeed, descriptions of these nice features that we do not have in R but are in other systems could be another way of driving the future progress of GUIs for R.

In summary, we envision papers for this special issue on GUIs for R in the following categories:

– General discussions on GUIs for statistics, and for R.

– Implementing GUI toolboxes for R so others can program GUIs with them.

– R GUIs examples (with two subcategories, in the desktop or in the cloud).

– Is there life beyond R? What features have other systems that R does not have and why R needs them.

Papers can be sent directly to Pedro Valero-Mora (valerop@uv.es) or Ruben Ledesma (rdledesma@gmail.com) and they will follow the usual JSS reviewing procedure. Initial deadline is December 2010 with final versions published along 2011.

====================================================
Jan de Leeuw; Distinguished Professor and Chair, UCLA Department of Statistics;
Director: UCLA Center for Environmental Statistics (CES);
Editor: Journal of Multivariate Analysis, Journal of Statistical Software;

Journal of Statistical Software

Here is a good open content Journal for people wanting to keep track of latest in statistical software.

It is called Journal of Statistical Software.

Citation: http://www.jstatsoft.org/

Established in 1996, the Journal of Statistical Software publishes articles, book reviews, code snippets, and software reviews on the subject of statistical software and algorithms.  The contents are freely available on-line.  For both articles and code snippets the source code is published along with the paper.

Implementations can use languages such as C, C++, S, Fortran, Java, PHP, Python and Ruby or environments such as Mathematica, MATLAB, R, S-PLUS, SAS, Stata, and XLISP-STAT.

E.g Book Reviews of  A Handbook of Statistical Analyses Using SAS (Third Edition)

and Statistics and Data with R: An Applied Approach Through Examples

jss

It is really cutting edge stuff for someone who wants to keep up with the latest and fast moving tech trends in statistical software and has convenient RSS feeds as well announce alerts for emails.

Note- Various Journals can be ranked using a quantitative index called Impact Factor

Citation http://in-cites.com/research/2007/august_27_2007-2.html

E.G For Statistics

In these columns, total citations to a journal’s published papers are divided by the total number of papers that the journal published, producing a citations-per-paper impact score over a five-year period (middle column) and a 26-year period (right-hand column).

Journals Ranked by Impact:
Statistics & Probability

Rank

2006
Impact Factor

Impact
2002-06

Impact
1981-2006
1 Bioinformatics
(4.89)
Bioinformatics
(9.87)
Econometrica
(52.93)
2 Biostatistics
(3.01)
J. Royal Stat. Soc. B
(6.75)
J. Royal Stat. Soc. B
(27.32)
3 Chemom. Intell. Lab.
(2.45)
Biostatistics
(6.56)
J. Am. Stat. Assoc.
(25.11)
4 Econometrica
(2.40)
J. Computat. Biology
(6.49)
Biometrika
(22.75)
5 J. Royal Stat. Soc. B
(2.32)
Econometrica
(5.82)
Annals of Statistics
(21.31)
6 IEEE ACM T Comp. Bi.
(2.28)
J. Chemometrics
(5.08)
Biometrics
(20.32)
7 J. Am. Stat. Assoc.
(2.17)
J. Am. Stat. Assoc.
(4.95)
Technometrics
(17.74)
8 Multivar. Behav. Res.
(2.10)
Statistical Science
(4.19)
Multivar. Behav. Res.
(16.62)
9 J. Computat. Biology
(2.00)
Annals of Statistics
(3.94)
Bioinformatics
(16.37)
10 Annals of Statistics
(1.90)
Stat. in Medicine
(3.62)
J. Royal Stat. Soc. A
(14.46)
%d bloggers like this: