Hacking for Beginners- Top Website Hacks

I really liked this 2002 presentation on Website Hacks at blackhat.com/presentations/bh-asia-02/bh-asia-02-shah.pdf . It explains in a easy manner some common fundamentals in hacking websites. Take time to go through this- its a good example of how hacking tutorials need to be created if you want to expand the number of motivated hackers.

However a more recent list of hacks is here-

https://blog.whitehatsec.com/top-ten-web-hacking-techniques-of-2012/

The Top Ten

  1. CRIME (12, 3 4) by Juliano Rizzo and Thai Duong
  2. Pwning via SSRF (memcached, php-fastcgi, etc) (23, 4, 5)
  3. Chrome addon hacking (2345)
  4. Bruteforce of PHPSESSID
  5. Blended Threats and JavaScript
  6. Cross-Site Port Attacks
  7. Permanent backdooring of HTML5 client-side application
  8. CAPTCHA Re-Riding Attack
  9. XSS: Gaining access to HttpOnly Cookie in 2012
  10. Attacking OData: HTTP Verb Tunneling, Navigation Properties for Additional Data Access, System Query Options ($select)

Honorable Mention

11. Using WordPress as a intranet and internet port scanner

12. .Net Cross Site Scripting – Request Validation Bypassing (1)

13. Bruteforcing/Abusing search functions with no-rate checks to collect data

14. Browser Event Hijacking (23)

But a more widely used ranking method for Website Hacking is here. Note it is a more formal but probably a more recent document than the pdf above. If only it could be made into an easier to read tutorial, it would greatly improve website exploit security strength.

https://www.owasp.org/index.php/Category:OWASP_Top_Ten_Project

The Release Candidate for the OWASP Top 10 for 2013 is now available here: OWASP Top 10 – 2013 – Release Candidate

The OWASP Top 10 – 2013 Release Candidate includes the following changes as compared to the 2010 edition:

  • A1 Injection
  • A2 Broken Authentication and Session Management (was formerly A3)
  • A3 Cross-Site Scripting (XSS) (was formerly A2)
  • A4 Insecure Direct Object References
  • A5 Security Misconfiguration (was formerly A6)
  • A6 Sensitive Data Exposure (merged from former A7 Insecure Cryptographic Storage and former A9 Insufficient Transport Layer Protection)
  • A7 Missing Function Level Access Control (renamed/broadened from former A8 Failure to Restrict URL Access)
  • A8 Cross-Site Request Forgery (CSRF) (was formerly A5)
  • A9 Using Known Vulnerable Components (new but was part of former A6 – Security Misconfiguration)
  • A10 Unvalidated Redirects and Forwards


Once again, I am presenting this as an example of how lucid documentation can help spread technological awareness to people affected by technical ignorance and lacking the savvy and chops for self-learning. If you need better cyber security, you need better documentation and tutorials on hacking for improving the quantity and quality of the pool of available hackers and bringing in young blood to enhance your cyber security edge.

Author: Ajay Ohri

http://about.me/ajayohri

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