Ways to use both Windows and Linux together

Tux, as originally drawn by Larry Ewing
Image via Wikipedia

Some programming ways to use both Windows and Linux

1) Wubi


Wubi only adds an extra option to boot into Ubuntu. Wubi does not require you to modify the partitions of your PC, or to use a different bootloader, and does not install special drivers.

2) Wine

Wine lets you run Windows software on other operating systems. With Wine, you can install and run these applications just like you would in Windows. Read more at http://wiki.winehq.org/Debunking_Wine_Myths


3) Cygwin


Cygwin is a Linux-like environment for Windows. It consists of two parts:

  • A DLL (cygwin1.dll) which acts as a Linux API emulation layer providing substantial Linux API functionality.
  • A collection of tools which provide Linux look and feel
  • What Isn’t Cygwin?

  • Cygwin is not a way to run native linux apps on Windows. You have to rebuild your application from source if you want it to run on Windows.
  • Cygwin is not a way to magically make native Windows apps aware of UNIX ® functionality, like signals, ptys, etc. Again, you need to build your apps from source if you want to take advantage of Cygwin functionality.
  • 4) Vmplayer


    VMware Player is the easiest way to run multiple operating systems at the same time on your PC. With its user-friendly interface, VMware Player makes it effortless for anyone to try out Windows 7, Chrome OS or the latest Linux releases, or create isolated virtual machines to safely test new software and surf the Web