How to use Bit Torrents

I really liked the software Qbittorent available from I think bit torrents should be the default way of sharing huge content especially software downloads. For protecting intellectual property there should be much better codes and software keys than presently available.

The qBittorrent project aims to provide a Free Software alternative to µtorrent. Additionally, qBittorrent runs and provides the same features on all major platforms (Linux, Mac OS X, Windows, OS/2, FreeBSD).

qBittorrent is based on Qt4 toolkit and libtorrent-rasterbar.

qBittorrent v2 Features

  • Polished µTorrent-like User Interface
  • Well-integrated and extensible Search Engine
    • Simultaneous search in most famous BitTorrent search sites
    • Per-category-specific search requests (e.g. Books, Music, Movies)
  • All Bittorrent extensions
    • DHT, Peer Exchange, Full encryption, Magnet/BitComet URIs, …
  • Remote control through a Web user interface
    • Nearly identical to the regular UI, all in Ajax
  • Advanced control over trackers, peers and torrents
    • Torrents queueing and prioritizing
    • Torrent content selection and prioritizing
  • UPnP / NAT-PMP port forwarding support
  • Available in ~25 languages (Unicode support)
  • Torrent creation tool
  • Advanced RSS support with download filters (inc. regex)
  • Bandwidth scheduler
  • IP Filtering (eMule and PeerGuardian compatible)
  • IPv6 compliant
  • Sequential downloading (aka “Download in order”)
  • Available on most platforms: Linux, Mac OS X, Windows, OS/2, FreeBSD
So if you are new to Bit Torrents- here is a brief tutorial
Some terminology from


tracker is a server that keeps track of which seeds and peers are in the swarm.


Seed is used to refer to a peer who has 100% of the data. When a leech obtains 100% of the data, that peer automatically becomes a Seed.


peer is one instance of a BitTorrent client running on a computer on the Internet to which other clients connect and transfer data.


leech is a term with two meanings. Primarily leech (or leeches) refer to a peer (or peers) who has a negative effect on the swarm by having a very poor share ratio (downloading much more than they upload, creating a ratio less than 1.0)
1) Download and install the software from
2) If you want to search for new files, you can use the nice search features in here
3) If you want to CREATE new bit torrents- go to Tools -Torrent Creator
4) For sharing content- just seed the torrent you just created. What is seeding – hey did you read the terminology in the beginning?
5) Additionally –

Trackers: Below are some popular public trackers. They are servers which help peers to communicate.

Here are some good trackers you can use:



When a file is new, much time can be wasted because the seeding client might send the same file piece to many different peers, while other pieces have not yet been downloaded at all. Some clients, like ABCVuzeBitTornado, TorrentStorm, and µTorrent have a “super-seed” mode, where they try to only send out pieces that have never been sent out before, theoretically making the initial propagation of the file much faster. However the super-seeding becomes less effective and may even reduce performance compared to the normal “rarest first” model in cases where some peers have poor or limited connectivity. This mode is generally used only for a new torrent, or one which must be re-seeded because no other seeds are available.
Note- you use this tutorial and any or all steps at your own risk. I am not legally responsible for any mishaps you get into. Please be responsible while being an efficient bit tor renter. That means respecting individual property rights.

Topic Models

Some stuff on Topic Models-

In machine learning and natural language processing, a topic model is a type of statistical model for discovering the abstract “topics” that occur in a collection of documents. An early topic model was probabilistic latent semantic indexing (PLSI), created by Thomas Hofmann in 1999.[1] Latent Dirichlet allocation (LDA), perhaps the most common topic model currently in use, is a generalization of PLSI developed by David Blei, Andrew Ng, and Michael Jordan in 2002, allowing documents to have a mixture of topics.[2] Other topic models are generally extensions on LDA, such as Pachinko allocation, which improves on LDA by modeling correlations between topics in addition to the word correlations which constitute topics. Although topic models were first described and implemented in the context of natural language processing, they have applications in other fields such as bioinformatics.

In statistics, latent Dirichlet allocation (LDA) is a generative model that allows sets of observations to be explained by unobserved groups that explain why some parts of the data are similar. For example, if observations are words collected into documents, it posits that each document is a mixture of a small number of topics and that each word’s creation is attributable to one of the document’s topics. LDA is an example of a topic model

David M Blei’s page on Topic Models-

The topic models mailing list is a good forum for discussing topic modeling.

In R,

Some resources I compiled on Slideshare based on the above-

Continue reading

UseR goes to Nashville, USA

So if Vanderbilt did lose (again) to UT ( , they have somethign better to look before next season’s football season.

UseR is coming to Tennessee in 2012! This is the premier conference happens annually for R language (>2 mill users), and alternated between Europe and North America every other year.

Details here

useR! 2012 (12-15 June 2012)
Department of Biostatistics
Vanderbilt University
School of Medicine
Nashville Tennessee USA





Pre-conference Survey

If you plan to attend useR! 2012, help us plan by completing a RedCAP Survey.



Stephania McNeal-Goddard
Assistant to the Chair
Phone:             615.322.2768
Fax: 615.343.4924
Vanderbilt University School of Medicine
Department of Biostatistics
S-2323 Medical Center North
Nashville, TN 37232-2158



Abstracts and Tutorial Proposals

Participants are encouraged to submit an abstract to for oral presentation during a Kaleidoscope or Focus session, or for poster presentation. Tutorial proposals are also welcomed.


  • Tutorial Submission: Dec 1 – Jan 31
  • Tutorial Acceptance Notification: Feb 1 – Feb 29
  • Abstract Submission: Dec 1 – Mar 12
  • Abstract Acceptance Notification: Mar 13 – Apr 15






  • Early Registration: Jan 1 – Feb 29
  • Regular Registration: Mar 1 – May 12
  • Late Registration: May 13 – June 11
  • On-site Registration: June 12 – June 15



Travel and Lodging Information

Vanderbilt University is located in Nashville, Tennessee, USA.

Air Travel

The nearest major airport to Vanderbilt University is the Nashville International Airport (BNA). The airport is about 10 miles east of the campus and downtown Nashville. The BNA website maintains a list of ground transportation options for air travelers. The approximate taxi fare from the airport to Vanderbilt University is $27. Shuttles and buses are also available from the airport. The latter is economical (approximate fare is $1.60), but the travel time is more than an hour.

Car Travel

Nashville is located at the intersection of three major interstates. Interstate 40 approaches from the east and west, interstate 24 from the northwest and southeast, and interstate 65 from the northeast and south.