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JSS launches special edition for GUI for #Rstats

I love GUIs (graphical user interfaces)- they might be TCL/TK based or GTK based or even QT based. As a researcher they help me with faster coding, as a consultant they help with faster transition of projects from startup to handover stage  and as an R  instructor helps me get people to learn R faster.

I wish Python had some GUIs though ;)

 

from the open access journal of statistical software-

JSS Special Volume 49: Graphical User Interfaces for R

Graphical User Interfaces for R
Pedro M. Valero-Mora, Ruben Ledesma
Vol. 49, Issue 1, Jun 2012
Submitted 2012-06-03, Accepted 2012-06-03
Integrated Degradation Models in R Using iDEMO
Ya-Shan Cheng, Chien-Yu Peng
Vol. 49, Issue 2, Jun 2012
Submitted 2010-12-31, Accepted 2011-06-29
Glotaran: A Java-Based Graphical User Interface for the R Package TIMP
Joris J. Snellenburg, Sergey Laptenok, Ralf Seger, Katharine M. Mullen, Ivo H. M. van Stokkum
Vol. 49, Issue 3, Jun 2012
Submitted 2011-01-20, Accepted 2011-09-16
A Graphical User Interface for R in a Rich Client Platform for Ecological Modeling
Marcel Austenfeld, Wolfram Beyschlag
Vol. 49, Issue 4, Jun 2012
Submitted 2011-01-05, Accepted 2012-02-20
Closing the Gap between Methodologists and End-Users: R as a Computational Back-End
Byron C. Wallace, Issa J. Dahabreh, Thomas A. Trikalinos, Joseph Lau, Paul Trow, Christopher H. Schmid
Vol. 49, Issue 5, Jun 2012
Submitted 2010-11-01, Accepted 2012-12-20
tourrGui: A gWidgets GUI for the Tour to Explore High-Dimensional Data Using Low-Dimensional Projections
Bei Huang, Dianne Cook, Hadley Wickham
Vol. 49, Issue 6, Jun 2012
Submitted 2011-01-20, Accepted 2012-04-16
The RcmdrPlugin.survival Package: Extending the R Commander Interface to Survival Analysis
John Fox, Marilia S. Carvalho
Vol. 49, Issue 7, Jun 2012
Submitted 2010-12-26, Accepted 2011-12-28
Deducer: A Data Analysis GUI for R
Ian Fellows
Vol. 49, Issue 8, Jun 2012
Submitted 2011-02-28, Accepted 2011-09-08
RKWard: A Comprehensive Graphical User Interface and Integrated Development Environment for Statistical Analysis with R
Stefan Rödiger, Thomas Friedrichsmeier, Prasenjit Kapat, Meik Michalke
Vol. 49, Issue 9, Jun 2012
Submitted 2010-12-28, Accepted 2011-05-06
gWidgetsWWW: Creating Interactive Web Pages within R
John Verzani
Vol. 49, Issue 10, Jun 2012
Submitted 2010-12-17, Accepted 2011-05-11
Oscars and Interfaces
Antony Unwin
Vol. 49, Issue 11, Jun 2012
Submitted 2010-12-08, Accepted 2011-07-15

Interview JJ Allaire Founder, RStudio

Here is an interview with JJ Allaire, founder of RStudio. RStudio is the IDE that has overtaken other IDE within the R Community in terms of ease of usage. On the eve of their latest product launch, JJ talks to DecisionStats on RStudio and more.

Ajay-  So what is new in the latest version of RStudio and how exactly is it useful for people?

JJ- The initial release of RStudio as well as the two follow-up releases we did last year were focused on the core elements of using R: editing and running code, getting help, and managing files, history, workspaces, plots, and packages. In the meantime users have also been asking for some bigger features that would improve the overall work-flow of doing analysis with R. In this release (v0.95) we focused on three of these features:

Projects. R developers tend to have several (and often dozens) of working contexts associated with different clients, analyses, data sets, etc. RStudio projects make it easy to keep these contexts well separated (with distinct R sessions, working directories, environments, command histories, and active source documents), switch quickly between project contexts, and even work with multiple projects at once (using multiple running versions of RStudio).

Version Control. The benefits of using version control for collaboration are well known, but we also believe that solo data analysis can achieve significant productivity gains by using version control (this discussion on Stack Overflow talks about why). In this release we introduced integrated support for the two most popular open-source version control systems: Git and Subversion. This includes changelist management, file diffing, and browsing of project history, all right from within RStudio.

Code Navigation. When you look at how programmers work a surprisingly large amount of time is spent simply navigating from one context to another. Modern programming environments for general purpose languages like C++ and Java solve this problem using various forms of code navigation, and in this release we’ve brought these capabilities to R. The two main features here are the ability to type the name of any file or function in your project and go immediately to it; and the ability to navigate to the definition of any function under your cursor (including the definition of functions within packages) using a keystroke (F2) or mouse gesture (Ctrl+Click).

Ajay- What’s the product road map for RStudio? When can we expect the IDE to turn into a full fledged GUI?

JJ- Linus Torvalds has said that “Linux is evolution, not intelligent design.” RStudio tries to operate on a similar principle—the world of statistical computing is too deep, diverse, and ever-changing for any one person or vendor to map out in advance what is most important. So, our internal process is to ship a new release every few months, listen to what people are doing with the product (and hope to do with it), and then start from scratch again making the improvements that are considered most important.

Right now some of the things which seem to be top of mind for users are improved support for authoring and reproducible research, various editor enhancements including code folding, and debugging tools.

What you’ll see is us do in a given release is to work on a combination of frequently requested features, smaller improvements to usability and work-flow, bug fixes, and finally architectural changes required to support current or future feature requirements.

While we do try to base what we work on as closely as possible on direct user-feedback, we also adhere to some core principles concerning the overall philosophy and direction of the product. So for example the answer to the question about the IDE turning into a full-fledged GUI is: never. We believe that textual representations of computations provide fundamental advantages in transparency, reproducibility, collaboration, and re-usability. We believe that writing code is simply the right way to do complex technical work, so we’ll always look for ways to make coding better, faster, and easier rather than try to eliminate coding altogether.

Ajay -Describe your journey in science from a high school student to your present work in R. I noticed you have been very successful in making software products that have been mostly proprietary products or sold to companies.

Why did you get into open source products with RStudio? What are your plans for monetizing RStudio further down the line?

JJ- In high school and college my principal areas of study were Political Science and Economics. I also had a very strong parallel interest in both computing and quantitative analysis. My first job out of college was as a financial analyst at a government agency. The tools I used in that job were SAS and Excel. I had a dim notion that there must be a better way to marry computation and data analysis than those tools, but of course no concept of what this would look like.

From there I went more in the direction of general purpose computing, starting a couple of companies where I worked principally on programming languages and authoring tools for the Web. These companies produced proprietary software, which at the time (between 1995 and 2005) was a workable model because it allowed us to build the revenue required to fund development and to promote and distribute the software to a wider audience.

By 2005 it was however becoming clear that proprietary software would ultimately be overtaken by open source software in nearly all domains. The cost of development had shrunken dramatically thanks to both the availability of high-quality open source languages and tools as well as the scale of global collaboration possible on open source projects. The cost of promoting and distributing software had also collapsed thanks to efficiency of both distribution and information diffusion on the Web.

When I heard about R and learned more about it, I become very excited and inspired by what the project had accomplished. A group of extremely talented and dedicated users had created the software they needed for their work and then shared the fruits of that work with everyone. R was a platform that everyone could rally around because it worked so well, was extensible in all the right ways, and most importantly was free (as in speech) so users could depend upon it as a long-term foundation for their work.

So I started RStudio with the aim of making useful contributions to the R community. We started with building an IDE because it seemed like a first-rate development environment for R that was both powerful and easy to use was an unmet need. Being aware that many other companies had built successful businesses around open-source software, we were also convinced that we could make RStudio available under a free and open-source license (the AGPLv3) while still creating a viable business. At this point RStudio is exclusively focused on creating the best IDE for R that we can. As the core product gets where it needs to be over the next couple of years we’ll then also begin to sell other products and services related to R and RStudio.

About-

http://rstudio.org/docs/about

Jjallaire

JJ Allaire

JJ Allaire is a software engineer and entrepreneur who has created a wide variety of products including ColdFusion,Windows Live WriterLose It!, and RStudio.

From http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joseph_J._Allaire
In 1995 Joseph J. (JJ) Allaire co-founded Allaire Corporation with his brother Jeremy Allaire, creating the web development tool ColdFusion.[1] In March 2001, Allaire was sold to Macromedia where ColdFusion was integrated into the Macromedia MX product line. Macromedia was subsequently acquired by Adobe Systems, which continues to develop and market ColdFusion.
After the sale of his company, Allaire became frustrated at the difficulty of keeping track of research he was doing using Google. To address this problem, he co-founded Onfolio in 2004 with Adam Berrey, former Allaire co-founder and VP of Marketing at Macromedia.
On March 8, 2006, Onfolio was acquired by Microsoft where many of the features of the original product are being incorporated into the Windows Live Toolbar. On August 13, 2006, Microsoft released the public beta of a new desktop blogging client called Windows Live Writer that was created by Allaire’s team at Microsoft.
Starting in 2009, Allaire has been developing a web-based interface to the widely used R technical computing environment. A beta version of RStudio was publicly released on February 28, 2011.
JJ Allaire received his B.A. from Macalester College (St. Paul, MN) in 1991.
RStudio-

RStudio is an integrated development environment (IDE) for R which works with the standard version of R available from CRAN. Like R, RStudio is available under a free software license. RStudio is designed to be as straightforward and intuitive as possible to provide a friendly environment for new and experienced R users alike. RStudio is also a company, and they plan to sell services (support, training, consulting, hosting) related to the open-source software they distribute.

Revolution #Rstats Webinar

David Smith of Revo presents a nice webinar on the capabilities and abilities of Revolution R- if you are R curious and wonder how the commercial version has matured- you may want to take a look.

click below to view an executive Webinar

——————————————————————————————-

Revolution R Enterprise—presented by author and blogger David Smith:

Revolution R: 100% R and More
On-Demand Webinar

This Webinar covers how R users can upgrade to:

  • Multi-processor speed improvements and parallel processing
  • Productivity and debugging with an integrated development environment (IDE) for the R language
  • “Big Data” analysis, with out-of-memory storage of multi-gigabyte data sets
  • Web Services for R, to integrate R computations and graphics into 3rd-Party applications like Excel and BI Dashboards
  • Expert technical support and consulting services for R

This webinar will be of value to current R users who want to learn more about the additional capabilities of Revolution R Enterprise to enhance the productivity, ease of use, and enterprise readiness of open source R. R users in academia will also find this webinar valuable: we will explain how all members of the academic community can obtain Revolution R Enterprise free of charge.

—————————————————————————————

contact -1-855-GET-REVO or via online form.
info@revolutionanalytics.com | (650) 330-0553 | Twitter @RevolutionR

Revolution releases R Windows for Academics for free

Logo for R

Image via Wikipedia

Based on the official email from them, God bless the merry coders at Revo-

Revolution Analytics has just released Revolution R Enterprise 4.3 for 32-bit and 64-bit Windows, a significant step forward in enterprise data analytics.  It features an updated RevoScaleR package for scalable, fast (multicore), and extensible data analysis with R. Revolution R Enterprise 4.3 for Windows also provides R 2.12.2, and includes an enhanced R Productivity Environment (RPE), a full-featured integrated development environment with visual debugging capabilities. Also available is an updated Windows release of our deployment server solution, RevoDeployR 1.2, designed to help you deliver R analytics via the Web.

As a registered user of the Academic version of Revolution R Enterprise for Windows, you can take advantage of these improvements by downloading and installing Revolution R Enterprise 4.3 today. You can install Revolution R Enterprise 4.3 side-by-side with your existing Revolution R Enterprise installations; there is no need to uninstall previous versions.

 

Protected: Using SAS and C/C++ together

This content is password protected. To view it please enter your password below:

The Latest GUI for R- BioR

Once more a spanking new shiny software -

Bio7 is a integrated development environment for ecological modelling based on the Rich-Client-Platformconcept of the Java IDE Eclipse. The Bio7 platform contains several perspectives which arrange several views for a special purpose useful for the development and analysis of ecological models. One special perspective bundles a feature rich GUI (Graphical User Interface) for the statistical software R.
For the bidirectional communication between Java and R the Rserve application is used (as a backend to evaluate R code and transfer data from and to Java).
The Bio7 R perspective (see figure below) is divided into a R-Shell view on the left side (conceptual the R side) and a Table view on the right side (conceptual the Java side).
Data can be imported to a spreadsheet, edited and then transferred to the R workspace. Vice versa data from R can be transferred to a sheet of the Table view and then exported e.g. to an Excel or OpenOffice file.

and

General:

Built upon Eclipse 3.6.1.

Now works with the latest Java version! (Windows version bundled with the latest JRE release).

Removed the Soil perspective (now soils can be modeled with ImageJ (float precision). Active images can be displayed in the 3D discrete view (new example available).

Removed the database perspective and the plant layer. You can now built any discrete models without any plant layer.

Removed several controls in the Control view. Added the “Custom Controls” view. In addition ported the Swing component of the Time panel to Swt.

Deleted the avi to swf converter in the ImageJ menu.

Now patterns can be saved with opened Java editor source. If this file is reopened and dragged on Bio7 the pattern is loaded, the source is compiled and the setup method (if available) is executed. In this way model files can be used for presentations ->drag, setup and run. The save actions are located in the Speadsheet view toolbar.

More options available to disable panel painting and recording of values (if not needed for speed!).

New Setup button in the toolbar of Bio7 to trigger a compiled setup method if available.

Removed the load and save pattern buttons from the toolbar of Bio7. Discrete patterns can now be stored with the available action in the spreadsheet view menu.

New P2 Update Manager available in Bio7.

Updated the Janino Compiler.

New HTML perspective added with a view which embeds the TinyMC editor.

New options to disable painting operations for the discrete panels.

New option to explicitly enable scripts at startup (for a faster startup).

Quadgrid (Hexgrid)

Only states are now available which can be created in the “Spreadsheet” view menu easily. Patterns can be stored and restored as usual but are now stored in an *.exml file.

New method to transfer the quadgrid pattern as a matrix to R.

New method to transfer the population data of all quadgrid states to R.

ImageJ:

Update to the latest version (with additional fixes).

Fixed a bug to rename the image.

Thumbnail browser can now open images recursevely(limited to 1000 pics), the magnifiyng glass can be disabled, too.

Plugins can be installed dynamically with a drag and drop operation on the ImageJ view or toolbar (as known from ImageJ).

Installed plugins now extend the plugin menu as submenus or subsubmenus (not finished yet!).

Plugins can now be created with the Java editor. New Bio7 Wizard available to create a plugin template.

Compiled Java files can be added to a *.jar file with a new available action in the Navigator view (if you rightclick on the files in the Navigator). In this way ImageJ plugins can be packaged in a *.jar.

Floweditor:

Fixed a repaint bug in the debug mode of a flow (now draws correctly the active shape in the flow).

Resize with Strg+Scrollwheel works again.

Comments with more than one line works again.

New Test action to verify connections in a flow.

Debug mode now shows all executed Shapes.

Integrated more default tests (for the verification of a regular flow).

A mouse-click now deletes colored shapes in a flow (e.g. in debug mode).

Points panel:

Integrated (dynamic) Voronoi, Delauney visualization (with area and clip to rectangle action).

Points coordinates can now be set in double precision.

Transfer of point coordinates to R now in double precision.

Bio7 Table:

New import and export of Excel 2007 OOXML.

Row headers can now be resized with the mouse device.

R:

Updated R (2.12.1) and Rserve (0.6.3) to the latest version.

New help action in the R-Shell view.

New action to display help for R specific commands in the embedded Bio7 browser (which opens automatically).

New Key actions to copy the selected variable names to the expression dialog (c=cocatenate (+), a=add (,)).

New action to transfer character or numeric vectors horizontally or vertically in an opened spread (Table view) at selection coordinates.

Empty spaces in the filepath are now allowed under Windows if Rserve is started with a system shell or the RGUI (for the tempfile select a location in the Preferences dialog which is writeable) is started.This works also for the RGUI action.

Improved the search for the “Install packages” action (option “Case Sensitive” added).

API:

New API methods available!

And:

Many fixes since the last version!

 

Installation

Important information:

A certain firewall software can corrupt the Bio7 *.zip file (as well as other files).
Please ensure that you have downloaded a functioning Bio7 1.5 version. In addition it is also reported that a certain antivirus software detects the bundled R software (on Windows) as malware. Often the R specific “open.exe” is detected as malware. Please use a different scanner to make sure that the software is not infected if you have any doubts. For more details see:

http://r.789695.n4.nabble.com/trojan-at-current-development-version-td3244348.html

 

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