Do android hackers tweet about electric sheep?

Here is a very amusing site where bunch of hackers discuss black hat techniques to game social media- they meet in the MJ website. LOL

Thats actually the official MJ website. (also see my Poem on MJ at

http://decisionstats.com/2011/04/29/tribute-to-michael-jackson/

and http://decisionstats.com/2009/12/01/obama-and-mj-on-history/)

But back to the funny twitter gamers

http://www.michaeljackson.com/us/node/703109

MICHAEL JACKSON YOU ARE OVER THE STATUS UPDATE LIMIT. PLEASE WAIT A FEW HOURS AND TRY AGAIN.

Joined: Jul 2009
Amman, Jordan

It's a code code summer

East-German pupils ("Junge Pioniere"...
Image via Wikipedia

and soc is back!

also expecting some #Rstats entries (open source!)

from https://code.google.com/soc/

Google Summer of Code 2011

Visit the Google Summer of Code 2011 site for more details about the program this year.

For a detailed timeline and further information about the program, review our Frequently Asked Questions.

About Google Summer of Code

Google Summer of Code is a global program that offers student developers stipends to write code for various open source software projects. We have worked with several open source, free software, and technology-related groups to identify and fund several projects over a three month period. Since its inception in 2005, the program has brought together over 4500 successful student participants and over 3000 mentors from over 100 countries worldwide, all for the love of code. Through Google Summer of Code, accepted student applicants are paired with a mentor or mentors from the participating projects, thus gaining exposure to real-world software development scenarios and the opportunity for employment in areas related to their academic pursuits. In turn, the participating projects are able to more easily identify and bring in new developers. Best of all, more source code is created and released for the use and benefit of all.

To learn more about the program, peruse our 2011 Frequently Asked Questions page. You can also subscribe to the Google Open Source Blog or the Google Summer of Code Discussion Group to keep abreast of the latest announcements.

Participating in Google Summer of Code

For those of you who would like to participate in the program, there are many resources available for you to learn more. Check out the information pages from the 20052006200720082009, and 2010 instances of the program to get a better sense of which projects have participated as mentoring organizations in Google Summer of Code each year. If you are interested in a particular mentoring organization, just click on its name and you’ll find more information about the project, a summary of their students’ work and actual source code produced by student participants. You may also find the program Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) pages for each year to be useful. Finally, check out all the great content and advice on participation produced by the community, for the community, on our program wiki.

If you don’t find what you need in the documentation, you can always ask questions on our program discussion list or the program IRC channel, #gsoc on Freenode.

 

The Mommy Track

Wage_labour
Image via Wikipedia

A new paper quantitatively analyzes the impact of child bearing on women. Summary-

Women [who score in the upper third on a standardized test] have a net 8 percent reduction in pay during the first five years after giving birth

From http://papers.nber.org/papers/w16582

Having a child lowers a woman’s lifetime earnings, but how much depends upon her skill level. In The Mommy Track Divides: The Impact of Childbearing on Wages of Women of Differing Skill Levels (NBER Working Paper No. 16582), co-authors Elizabeth Ty Wilde, Lily Batchelder, and David Ellwood estimate that having a child costs the average high skilled woman $230,000 in lost lifetime wages relative to similar women who never gave birth. By comparison, low skilled women experience a lifetime wage loss of only $49,000.

Using the 1979 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY), Wilde et. al. divided women into high, medium, and low skill categories based on their Armed Forces Qualification Test (AFQT) scores. The authors use these skill categories, combined with earnings, labor force participation, and family formation data, to chart the labor market progress of women before and after childbirth, from ages 14-to-21 in 1979 through 41-to-49 in 2006, this study’s final sample year.

High scoring and low scoring women differed in a number of ways. While 70-75 percent of higher scoring women work full-time all year prior to their first birth, only 55-60 percent of low scoring women do. As they age, the high scoring women enjoy steeper wage growth than low scoring women; low scoring women’s wages do not change much if they reenter the labor market after they have their first child. Five years after the first birth, about 35 percent of each group is working full-time. However, the high scoring women who are not working full-time are more likely to be working part-time than the low scoring women, who are more likely to leave the workforce entirely.

and

Men’s earning profiles are relatively unaffected by having children although men who never have children earn less on average than those who do. High scoring women who have children late also tend to earn more than high scoring childless women. Their earnings advantage occurs before they have children and narrows substantially after they become mothers.