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Writing on APIs for Programmable Web

I have been writing free lance on APIs for Programmable Web. Here is an updated list of the articles, many of these would be of interest to analytics users. Note- some of these are interviews and they are in bold. Note to regular readers: I keep updating this list , and at each updation bring it to the front page, then allowing the blog postings to slide it down!

Scoreoid Aims to Gamify the World Using APIs January 27th, 2014

Plot.ly’s Plot to Visualize More Data January 22nd, 2014

LumenData’s Acquisition of Algorithms.io is a Win-Win January 8th, 2014

Yactraq API Sees Huge Growth in 2013  January 6th, 2014

Scrape.it Describes a Better Way to Extract Data December 20th, 2013

Exclusive Interview: App Store Analytics API December 4th, 2013

APIs Enter 3d Printing Industry November 29th, 2013

PW Interview: José Luis Martinez of Textalytics November 6th, 2013

PW Interview Simon Chan PredictionIO November 5th, 2013

PW Interview: Scott Gimpel Founder and CEO FantasyData.com October 23rd, 2013

PW Interview Brandon Levy, cofounder and CEO of Stitch Labs October 8th, 2013

PW Interview: Jolo Balbin Co-Founder Text Teaser  September 18th, 2013

PW Interview:Bob Bickel CoFounder Redline13 July 29th, 2013

PW Interview : Brandon Wirtz CTO Stremor.com   July 4th, 2013

PW Interview: Andy Bartley, CEO Algorithms.io  June 4th, 2013

PW Interview: Francisco J Martin, CEO BigML.com 2013/05/30

PW Interview: Tal Rotbart Founder- CTO, SpringSense 2013/05/28

PW Interview: Jeh Daruwala CEO Yactraq API, Behavorial Targeting for videos 2013/05/13

PW Interview: Michael Schonfeld of Dwolla API on Innovation Meeting the Payment Web  2013/05/02

PW Interview: Stephen Balaban of Lamda Labs on the Face Recognition API  2013/04/29

PW Interview: Amber Feng, Stripe API, The Payment Web 2013/04/24

PW Interview: Greg Lamp and Austin Ogilvie of Yhat on Shipping Predictive Models via API   2013/04/22

Google Mirror API documentation is open for developers   2013/04/18

PW Interview: Ricky Robinett, Ordr.in API, Ordering Food meets API    2013/04/16

PW Interview: Jacob Perkins, Text Processing API, NLP meets API   2013/04/10

Amazon EC2 On Demand Windows Instances -Prices reduced by 20%  2013/04/08

Amazon S3 API Requests prices slashed by half  2013/04/02

PW Interview: Stuart Battersby, Chatterbox API, Machine Learning meets Social 2013/04/02

PW Interview: Karthik Ram, rOpenSci, Wrapping all science API2013/03/20

Viralheat Human Intent API- To buy or not to buy 2013/03/13

Interview Tammer Kamel CEO and Founder Quandl 2013/03/07

YHatHQ API: Calling Hosted Statistical Models 2013/03/04

Quandl API: A Wikipedia for Numerical Data 2013/02/25

Amazon Redshift API is out of limited preview and available! 2013/02/18

Windows Azure Media Services REST API 2013/02/14

Data Science Toolkit Wraps Many Data Services in One API 2013/02/11

Diving into Codeacademy’s API Lessons 2013/01/31

Google APIs finetuning Cloud Storage JSON API 2013/01/29

2012
Ergast API Puts Car Racing Fans in the Driver’s Seat 2012/12/05
Springer APIs- Fostering Innovation via API Contests 2012/11/20
Statistically programming the web – Shiny,HttR and RevoDeploy API 2012/11/19
Google Cloud SQL API- Bigger ,Faster and now Free 2012/11/12
A Look at the Web’s Most Popular API -Google Maps API 2012/10/09
Cloud Storage APIs for the next generation Enterprise 2012/09/26
Last.fm API: Sultan of Musical APIs 2012/09/12
Socrata Data API: Keeping Government Open 2012/08/29
BigML API Gets Bigger 2012/08/22
Bing APIs: the Empire Strikes Back 2012/08/15
Google Cloud SQL: Relational Database on the Cloud 2012/08/13
Google BigQuery API Makes Big Data Analytics Easy 2012/08/05
Your Store in The Cloud -Google Cloud Storage API 2012/08/01
Predict the future with Google Prediction API 2012/07/30
The Romney vs Obama API 2012/07/27

Amazon gives away 750 hours /month of Windows based computing

and an additional 750 hours /month of Linux based computing. The windows instance is really quite easy for users to start getting the hang of cloud computing. and it is quite useful for people to tinker around, given Google’s retail cloud offerings are taking so long to hit the market

But it is only for new users.

http://aws.typepad.com/aws/2012/01/aws-free-usage-tier-now-includes-microsoft-windows-on-ec2.html

WS Free Usage Tier now Includes Microsoft Windows on EC2

The AWS Free Usage Tier now allows you to run Microsoft Windows Server 2008 R2 on an EC2 t1.micro instance for up to 750 hours per month. This benefit is open to new AWS customers and to those who are already participating in the Free Usage Tier, and is available in all AWS Regions with the exception of GovCloud. This is an easy way for Windows users to start learning about and enjoying the benefits of cloud computing with AWS.

The micro instances provide a small amount of consistent processing power and the ability to burst to a higher level of usage from time to time. You can use this instance to learn about Amazon EC2, support a development and test environment, build an AWS application, or host a web site (or all of the above). We’ve fine-tuned the micro instances to make them even better at running Microsoft Windows Server.

You can launch your instance from the AWS Management Console:

We have lots of helpful resources to get you started:

Along with 750 instance hours of Windows Server 2008 R2 per month, the Free Usage Tier also provides another 750 instance hours to run Linux (also on a t1.micro), Elastic Load Balancer time and bandwidth, Elastic Block Storage, Amazon S3 Storage, and SimpleDB storage, a bunch of Simple Queue Service and Simple Notification Service requests, and some CloudWatch metrics and alarms (see the AWS Free Usage Tier page for details). We’ve also boosted the amount of EBS storage space offered in the Free Usage Tier to 30GB, and we’ve doubled the I/O requests in the Free Usage Tier, to 2 million.

 

Google Storage for Developers goes into Enterprise Mode

Schematic representation of the SSL handshake ...

Image via Wikipedia

To help unify and uniform, collobrative work and data management and business models across the enterprise in secure SSL cloud environments- Google Storage has been rolling out some changes (read below)-this also gives you more options on the day Amazon goes ahem down (cough cough) because they didn’t think someone in their data environment could be sympathetic to free data.

——————————————————————————————————————————————————————–

https://groups.google.com/group/gs-announce

And now to the actual update.

We’re making some changes to Google Storage for Developers to make team-based development easier. As part of this work, we are introducing the concept of a project. In preparation for this feature, we will be creating projects for every user and migrating their buckets to it.

What does this mean for you?

Everything will continue to work as it always has. However, you will notice that if you perform a get-acl operation on any of your buckets, you will see extra ACL entries. These entries correspond to project groups. Each group has only one member – the person who owned the buckets before the bucket migration;  no additional rights have been granted to any of your buckets or objects. You should preserve these new ACL grants if you modify bucket ACLs.

An example entry for a modified ACL would look like this:

We’ll be rolling out these changes over the next few days,

http://blog.cloudberrylab.com/2011/04/cloudberry-explorer-for-google-storage.html

Detailed Note on GS-

https://code.google.com/apis/storage/

Google Storage for Developers is a RESTful service for storing and accessing your data on Google’s infrastructure. The service combines the performance and scalability of Google’s cloud with advanced security and sharing capabilities. Highlights include:

Fast, scalable, highly available object store

  • All data replicated to multiple U.S. data centers
  • Read-your-writes data consistency
  • Objects of hundreds of gigabytes in size per request with range-get support
  • Domain-scoped bucket namespace

Easy, flexible authentication and sharing

  • Key-based authentication
  • Authenticated downloads from a web browser
  • Individual- and group-level access controls

In addition, Google Storage for Developers offers a web-based interface for managing your storage and GSUtil, an open source command line tool and library. The service is also compatible with many existing cloud storage tools and libraries. With pay-as-you-go pricing, it’s easy to get started and scale as your needs grow.

Google Storage for Developers is currently only available to a limited number of developers. Please sign up to join the waiting list.

Amazon S3 slashes prices

Outline of a cloud containing text 'The Cloud'

Image via Wikipedia

From Amazon- November seems like a Thanksgiving for prices as well-

————————————————————————————————

lowered the threshold for our volume based discounts from 50 terabytes to 1 terabyte, extending volume pricing discounts to more customers. Here’s a summary of the changes:

Old         New
First 1TB           $0.150    $0.140
Next 49TB         $0.150    $0.125
Next 50TB         $0.140    $0.110
Next 400TB       $0.130    $0.110
Next 500TB       $0.105    $0.095
Next 4000TB     $0.080    $0.080 (no change)
Over 5000TB     $0.055    $0.055 (no change)

These prices apply to Amazon S3 Standard storage in the US-Standard, EU-West, and AP-East regions. The new lower prices for the US-West region and Reduced Redundancy Storage can be found on the Amazon S3 Detail Page.

 

Amazon goes free for users next month

Amazon Web Services logo

Image via Wikipedia

Amazon EC2 and company announced a free year long tier for new users-you cant beat free :)

http://aws.amazon.com/free/

AWS Free Usage Tier

To help new AWS customers get started in the cloud, AWS is introducing a new free usage tier. Beginning November 1, new AWScustomers will be able to run a free Amazon EC2 Micro Instance for a year, while also leveraging a new free usage tier for Amazon S3, Amazon Elastic Block Store, Amazon Elastic Load Balancing, and AWSdata transfer. AWS’s free usage tier can be used for anything you want to run in the cloud: launch new applications, test existing applications in the cloud, or simply gain hands-on experience with AWS.

Below are the highlights of AWS’s new free usage tiers. All are available for one year (except Amazon SimpleDB, SQS, and SNS which are free indefinitely):

Sign Up Now

AWS’s free usage tier startsNovember 1, 2010. A valid creditcard is required to sign up.
See offer terms.

AWS Free Usage Tier (Per Month):

In addition to these services, the AWS Management Console is available at no charge to help you build and manage your application on AWS.

* These free tiers are only available to new AWS customers and are available for 12 months following your AWSsign-up date. When your free usage expires or if your application use exceeds the free usage tiers, you simply pay standard, pay-as-you-go service rates (see each service page for full pricing details). Restrictions apply; see offer terms for more details.

** These free tiers do not expire after 12 months and are available to both existing and new AWS customers indefinitely.

The new AWS free usage tier applies to participating services across all AWS regions: US – N. Virginia, US – N. California, EU – Ireland, and APAC – Singapore. Your free usage is calculated each month across all regions and automatically applied to your bill – free usage does not accumulate.

 

R on Windows HPC Server

From HPC Wire, the newsletter/site for all HPC news-

Source- Link

PALO ALTO, Calif., Sept. 20 — Revolution Analytics, the leading commercial provider of software and support for the popular open source R statistics language, today announced it will deliver Revolution R Enterprise for Microsoft Windows HPC Server 2008 R2, released today, enabling users to analyze very large data sets in high-performance computing environments.

R is a powerful open source statistics language and the modern system for predictive analytics. Revolution Analytics recently introduced RevoScaleR, new “Big Data” analysis capabilities, to its R distribution, Revolution R Enterprise. RevoScaleR solves the performance and capacity limitations of the R language by with parallelized algorithms that stream data across multiple cores on a laptop, workstation or server. Users can now process, visualize and model terabyte-class data sets at top speeds — without the need for specialized hardware.

“Revolution Analytics is pleased to support Microsoft’s Technical Computing initiative, whose efforts will benefit scientists, engineers and data analysts,” said David Champagne, CTO at Revolution. “We believe the engineering we have done for Revolution R Enterprise, in particular our work on big-data statistics and multicore computing, along with Microsoft’s HPC platform for technical computing, makes an ideal combination for high-performance large scale statistical computing.”

“Processing and analyzing this ‘big data’ is essential to better prediction and decision making,” said Bill Hamilton, director of technical computing at Microsoft Corp. “Revolution R Enterprise for Windows HPC Server 2008 R2 gives customers an extremely powerful tool that handles analysis of very large data and high workloads.”

To learn more about Revolution R Enterprise and its Big Data capabilities, download thewhite paper. Revolution Analytics also has an on-demand webcast, “High-performance analytics with Revolution R and Windows HPC Server,” available online.

AND from Microsoft’s website

http://www.microsoft.com/hpc/en/us/solutions/hpc-for-life-sciences.aspx

REvolution R Enterprise »

REvolution Computing

REvolution R Enterprise is designed for both novice and experienced R users looking for a production-grade R distribution to perform mission critical predictive analytics tasks right from the desktop and scale across multiprocessor environments. Featuring RPE™ REvolution’s R Productivity Environment for Windows.

Of course R Enterprise is available on Linux but on Red Hat Enterprise Linux- it would be nice to see Amazom Machine Images as well as Ubuntu versions as well.

An Amazon Machine Image (AMI) is a special type of virtual appliance which is used to instantiate (create) a virtual machine within the Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud. It serves as the basic unit of deployment for services delivered using EC2.[1]

Like all virtual appliances, the main component of an AMI is a read-only filesystem image which includes an operating system (e.g., Linux, UNIX, or Windows) and any additional software required to deliver a service or a portion of it.[2]

The AMI filesystem is compressed, encrypted, signed, split into a series of 10MB chunks and uploaded into Amazon S3 for storage. An XML manifest file stores information about the AMI, including name, version, architecture, default kernel id, decryption key and digests for all of the filesystem chunks.

An AMI does not include a kernel image, only a pointer to the default kernel id, which can be chosen from an approved list of safe kernels maintained by Amazon and its partners (e.g., RedHat, Canonical, Microsoft). Users may choose kernels other than the default when booting an AMI.[3]

[edit]Types of images

  • Public: an AMI image that can be used by any one.
  • Paid: a for-pay AMI image that is registered with Amazon DevPay and can be used by any one who subscribes for it. DevPay allows developers to mark-up Amazon’s usage fees and optionally add monthly subscription fees.
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